Did Argentina drop napalm on there own dead??

What makes it so unbelievable is simply the fact that despite all the other rumours and legends, this particular one was never heard of until someone published a book about it several decades later.
I made a number of posts on this site last year, in which I said that during my time in the Falklands from December 1982 to June 1983 I heard a number of Falkland Islanders express views about the number of Argentine casualties being much higher than admitted. To the best of my knowledge I have never met Mr Phillips, nor have I read his book. (One poster in the thread actually said I was Mr Phillips, and claimed his 25 Argentinian ears......I believe he was joking, but on ARRSE you can never tell)

The majority of posters have taken issue with Mr Phillips, and have asked for evidence to back up his claims.

In an earlier post, Mr Phillips in fact referred to the book written by John Smith, a well-known as respected Falklands resident, which was published in 1984 and titled "74 Days". The book is a compilation of Mr Smith's diary from April 1 to June 15 of 1982.

I dug out my own copy, signed by John Smith during one of my subsequent visits to the Falklands after 1983. I was sure he had recorded accounts which sounded similar to those under discussion, so I re-read it. Whilst perhaps not "proofs" of the kind usually demanded by Russian trolls, I would suggest that his written diary entries could be acceptable as evidence of something which was being said at the time.

Here are some extracts.

13 April: "A party of Argentine troops has today been searching the beach down past the FIC ( Falkland Island Company) offices for bodies from one of their landing craft which was sunk during the invasion. Some have already been washed up."

17 April: "A bombing exercise by the Air Force with Pucaras is going on in York Bay/Tussac Island area. One of the islands was well alight by mid-afternoon, with the smoke and flames rising hundreds of feet into the air."

21 April: More on bombings continuing at Tussac Islands. "God knows what this is doing to the wildlife out there. It is said, although it is difficult to find evidence to support it, that the Argentine dead still being recovered from the invasion, and the deaths from exposure, are being put on the islands so that no trace remains of their losses, which during the invasion period were far heavier than admitted." (my italics)

13 June: "The Beaver hangar is said to be a mortuary, with hundreds of Argentine bodies in it."

End of extracts.

My point in drawing attention to them is that several posters have stated that they never heard of such stories in their own visits ashore to the Falklands post conflict.

Mr Smith himself makes the point that "It is difficult to find evidence to support it " with regard to the "body-burning" at the Tussac Islands.

However, his diary supports the contention that the story was circulating in Stanley at the time. I would ask Mr Phillips whether he interviewed Mr Smith, or simply drew from the book.
 
I made a number of posts on this site last year, in which I said that during my time in the Falklands from December 1982 to June 1983 I heard a number of Falkland Islanders express views about the number of Argentine casualties being much higher than admitted. To the best of my knowledge I have never met Mr Phillips, nor have I read his book. (One poster in the thread actually said I was Mr Phillips, and claimed his 25 Argentinian ears......I believe he was joking, but on ARRSE you can never tell)

The majority of posters have taken issue with Mr Phillips, and have asked for evidence to back up his claims.

In an earlier post, Mr Phillips in fact referred to the book written by John Smith, a well-known as respected Falklands resident, which was published in 1984 and titled "74 Days". The book is a compilation of Mr Smith's diary from April 1 to June 15 of 1982.

I dug out my own copy, signed by John Smith during one of my subsequent visits to the Falklands after 1983. I was sure he had recorded accounts which sounded similar to those under discussion, so I re-read it. Whilst perhaps not "proofs" of the kind usually demanded by Russian trolls, I would suggest that his written diary entries could be acceptable as evidence of something which was being said at the time.

Here are some extracts.

13 April: "A party of Argentine troops has today been searching the beach down past the FIC ( Falkland Island Company) offices for bodies from one of their landing craft which was sunk during the invasion. Some have already been washed up."

17 April: "A bombing exercise by the Air Force with Pucaras is going on in York Bay/Tussac Island area. One of the islands was well alight by mid-afternoon, with the smoke and flames rising hundreds of feet into the air."

21 April: More on bombings continuing at Tussac Islands. "God knows what this is doing to the wildlife out there. It is said, although it is difficult to find evidence to support it, that the Argentine dead still being recovered from the invasion, and the deaths from exposure, are being put on the islands so that no trace remains of their losses, which during the invasion period were far heavier than admitted." (my italics)

13 June: "The Beaver hangar is said to be a mortuary, with hundreds of Argentine bodies in it."

End of extracts.

My point in drawing attention to them is that several posters have stated that they never heard of such stories in their own visits ashore to the Falklands post conflict.

Mr Smith himself makes the point that "It is difficult to find evidence to support it " with regard to the "body-burning" at the Tussac Islands.

However, his diary supports the contention that the story was circulating in Stanley at the time. I would ask Mr Phillips whether he interviewed Mr Smith, or simply drew from the book.
How very nice that the occupying force decided to take a local resident into their confidence .

Maybe the rumour of the LEPs finding mustard gas at ISAF HQ whilst they were digging a trench was true.....or maybe it was rumour
 
How very nice that the occupying force decided to take a local resident into their confidence .

Maybe the rumour of the LEPs finding mustard gas at ISAF HQ whilst they were digging a trench was true.....or maybe it was rumour
Yes, I agree, quite possibly rumour.

But you have missed the point I was trying to make. Several posters have queried the validity of Mr Phillips' book at least partially on the grounds that they had never heard of rumours such as that the Argentines burned the bodies of their casualties on the Tussac Islands, despite their visiting the Falklands several times.

I did hear such rumours in 1982/83, and the extracts from John Smith's book support my memory.

Poo-pooing the rumour on the grounds that you didn't hear it yourself is hardly objective.
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
I made a number of posts on this site last year, in which I said that during my time in the Falklands from December 1982 to June 1983 I heard a number of Falkland Islanders express views about the number of Argentine casualties being much higher than admitted. To the best of my knowledge I have never met Mr Phillips, nor have I read his book. (One poster in the thread actually said I was Mr Phillips, and claimed his 25 Argentinian ears......I believe he was joking, but on ARRSE you can never tell)

The majority of posters have taken issue with Mr Phillips, and have asked for evidence to back up his claims.

In an earlier post, Mr Phillips in fact referred to the book written by John Smith, a well-known as respected Falklands resident, which was published in 1984 and titled "74 Days". The book is a compilation of Mr Smith's diary from April 1 to June 15 of 1982.

I dug out my own copy, signed by John Smith during one of my subsequent visits to the Falklands after 1983. I was sure he had recorded accounts which sounded similar to those under discussion, so I re-read it. Whilst perhaps not "proofs" of the kind usually demanded by Russian trolls, I would suggest that his written diary entries could be acceptable as evidence of something which was being said at the time.

Here are some extracts.

13 April: "A party of Argentine troops has today been searching the beach down past the FIC ( Falkland Island Company) offices for bodies from one of their landing craft which was sunk during the invasion. Some have already been washed up."

17 April: "A bombing exercise by the Air Force with Pucaras is going on in York Bay/Tussac Island area. One of the islands was well alight by mid-afternoon, with the smoke and flames rising hundreds of feet into the air."

21 April: More on bombings continuing at Tussac Islands. "God knows what this is doing to the wildlife out there. It is said, although it is difficult to find evidence to support it, that the Argentine dead still being recovered from the invasion, and the deaths from exposure, are being put on the islands so that no trace remains of their losses, which during the invasion period were far heavier than admitted." (my italics)

13 June: "The Beaver hangar is said to be a mortuary, with hundreds of Argentine bodies in it."

End of extracts.

My point in drawing attention to them is that several posters have stated that they never heard of such stories in their own visits ashore to the Falklands post conflict.

Mr Smith himself makes the point that "It is difficult to find evidence to support it " with regard to the "body-burning" at the Tussac Islands.

However, his diary supports the contention that the story was circulating in Stanley at the time. I would ask Mr Phillips whether he interviewed Mr Smith, or simply drew from the book.
It is said that the bombing exercise you mention was actually the return of Smaug from the afterlife.
 
Yes, I agree, quite possibly rumour.

But you have missed the point I was trying to make. Several posters have queried the validity of Mr Phillips' book at least partially on the grounds that they had never heard of rumours such as that the Argentines burned the bodies of their casualties on the Tussac Islands, despite their visiting the Falklands several times.

I did hear such rumours in 1982/83, and the extracts from John Smith's book support my memory.

Poo-pooing the rumour on the grounds that you didn't hear it yourself is hardly objective.
I heard shed loads of rumours, none of them were ever substantiated, so I never felt compelled to repeat them to lend credence.

Granted, you and others may have heard other rumours, whilst I & many others didn't.

It proves there were indeed lots of rumours ....none of which seem to have any credence beyond being recorded & retold without credible substance.

Fair call on recalling the rumour, the awareness of the rumour and the relating of the rumour in another book. It remains rumour, along with the alleged ear -collecting Ghurkas, the execution of supposed mercenaries and the SAS firing SMGs from the hip whilst sit astride CanAm motorbikes and cutting swathes of Argentinians as they fled the battlefield.

The existance of the rumour is true. The content remains utter bollix without proof
 
I heard shed loads of rumours, none of them were ever substantiated, so I never felt compelled to repeat them to lend credence.

Granted, you and others may have heard other rumours, whilst I & many others didn't.

It proves there were indeed lots of rumours ....none of which seem to have any credence beyond being recorded & retold without credible substance.

Fair call on recalling the rumour, the awareness of the rumour and the relating of the rumour in another book. It remains rumour, along with the alleged ear -collecting Ghurkas, the execution of supposed mercenaries and the SAS firing SMGs from the hip whilst sit astride CanAm motorbikes and cutting swathes of Argentinians as they fled the battlefield.

The existance of the rumour is true. The content remains utter bollix without proof
I reckon it's up to Mr Phillips to come up with evidence to support his case. Not having read his book, I'm not able to judge what he may already have provided.

(btw, I like your list of other rumours, but it does not include the recurring post-conflict story of British helicopters flying over penguin colonies slowly and making the birds look up until they fell over backwards in droves. I heard that one before I arrived in the Falklands in late 82, and it has come up regularly as a fact in the media ever since)
 
On this day in 1982 Argentina dropped napalm onto the bodies of almost 100 men killed in the April 2nd invasion to deny having lost them... Ricky Phillips on Twitter

Bloke on Twitter saying it happened but not heard this before???

Anyone
The idea of destroying large numbers of bodies by dropping napalm on them is utter, utter nonsense. Napalm does burn at crematorium-level temperatures but obviously only briefly, and even official cremation doesn't destroy everything.
 
The idea of destroying large numbers of bodies by dropping napalm on them is utter, utter nonsense. Napalm does burn at crematorium-level temperatures but obviously only briefly, and even official cremation doesn't destroy everything.
Yeeeeees, I mean a country (and military) famed for hoofing live bodies into the South Atlantic in order to disappear them would obviously not think to do that to get rid of a pile of unwanted corpses would they?
 
Yeeeeees, I mean a country (and military) famed for hoofing live bodies into the South Atlantic in order to disappear them would obviously not think to do that to get rid of a pile of unwanted corpses would they?
My post was clearly about the unfeasibility of destroying large numbers of bodies by dropping napalm on them as per the OP. Nothing to do with Argentine disposal by flight methods.
 
My post was clearly about the unfeasibility of destroying large numbers of bodies by dropping napalm on them as per the OP. Nothing to do with Argentine disposal by flight methods.
Yes. I was trying to further your well made point that not only was burning unfeasible it was also a departure from an established, and considerably easier, modus operandi.
 
I reckon it's up to Mr Phillips to come up with evidence to support his case. Not having read his book, I'm not able to judge what he may already have provided.

(btw, I like your list of other rumours, but it does not include the recurring post-conflict story of British helicopters flying over penguin colonies slowly and making the birds look up until they fell over backwards in droves. I heard that one before I arrived in the Falklands in late 82, and it has come up regularly as a fact in the media ever since)
Yep, heard the penguin myth also - in fact I remember telling my mates it was 100% genuine...only to later discover it was another duff un'.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
Whilst I can understand why both sides might have played down casualties while there was still the chance of a peaceful outcome, in the light of what followed, I find it hard to believe that Royal kept quiet for over thirty years about deep sixing shedloads of Argies in an heroic defence of Government House.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
(btw, I like your list of other rumours, but it does not include the recurring post-conflict story of British helicopters flying over penguin colonies slowly and making the birds look up until they fell over backwards in droves. I heard that one before I arrived in the Falklands in late 82, and it has come up regularly as a fact in the media ever since)
We had the same one running in a couple of versions in SA, it was the SALM chopper boys overflying either penguins on islands or meerkats on the Border.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Based upon hospital records and reports from the hospital staff on duty, and factoring in those bodies seen and confirmed by multiple witnesses, including in their private diaries, the figure adds up. Hugh Bicheno, with MI6 in Buenos Aires, intercepted radio transmission stating "dozens of dead" and even a number of Argentine nurses wrote a book about their wartime experiences recently, where they all state that they were rushed in to deal with the emergency of all of the casualties from the invasion... if the Argentine reports be believed, that was two men. You mobilise loads of extra nurses in an emergency for two men? No....
In times of expected conflict, Governments often mobilise many medical staff.

I used to have a copy of all the hospitals in The UK that were on alert to receive casualties during GW1. The number and locations of them are surprising and very numerous.

I was in QEMH Woolwich during that encounter, we had cleared every spare bed we could and fortunately never needed them as the casualties never arrived in the number expected.

I have on other occasions been called to potentially help with possible mass casualty situations that have thankfully never occurred.
 
In times of expected conflict, Governments often mobilise many medical staff.

I used to have a copy of all the hospitals in The UK that were on alert to receive casualties during GW1. The number and locations of them are surprising and very numerous.

I was in QEMH Woolwich during that encounter, we had cleared every spare bed we could and fortunately never needed them as the casualties never arrived in the number expected.

I have on other occasions been called to potentially help with possible mass casualty situations that have thankfully never occurred.
This has been standard for many years,as part of MASCAL procedure. Much easier to mobilise staff early and stand them down if not needed than try to rush them in when the cas start piling up. The only caveat being that you can easily overestimate the casualties expected and then mobilise unsustainable numbers of med staff (Op TELIC 1 anyone?!)

Like you, I have been mobilised, stood to, and generally f**ked about on numerous occasions because G3 ( or NHS equivalent) have cocked up the casualty estimates.
 
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seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
Nowadays there are political consequences to underestimating casualties. Better to overestimate and then perhaps be thankful when the casualties don't eventuate. The consequences for the wounded in the Mesopotamia campaign, where the provision was based on what turned out to be totally inadequate Indian Army frontier war scales, were dire. As my grandfather discovered, the hard way.
 
What if the Argentinians did drop napalm on the Tussac Islands (as part of the bombing exercises) and around the same time deep 6 the bodies of the dead who were killed by the Marines? It would be easy to put two and two together and come up with 5. I agree that there would be evidence of bodies on the Tussacs even today, let's face it, we couldn't dig in at Bergen-Hohne in case we dug up bones in the 80's.
 
How would they come up with that number as actually fired?

I have the sneaky feeling they just count the 5.56 sent to units and which are not turned back in as fired, not taking into account it may be turned over to the next unit
46 million rounds fired at a cost of £200 million?

Even my basic maths skills says that's almost £4.35 a round, which is utter bolleaux.
Unless of course the 200 million includes every round, grenade, bomb, missile, rocket.....
 
The idea of destroying large numbers of bodies by dropping napalm on them is utter, utter nonsense. Napalm does burn at crematorium-level temperatures but obviously only briefly, and even official cremation doesn't destroy everything.
Teeth and bone fragments remain, I believe. They put it into a ball mill to reduce the solid fragments to powder. Time Team & similar dig up Roman cremation urns with bits of bone in them. There'd be teeth all over the island and there'd be Argentine accounts of the body disposal system. It's too inconsistent to be true.
 

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