Did any British Forces Serve In Vietnam?

Met an old fella once who said he was in signals and got sent to Vietnam attach to Aussie army , the yanks needed his lot as they only ones with the tech to pin point the Congs morter position s
Your post makes no sense whatsoever.
If the yanks needed his expertise, why was he attached to the Aussies and not the yanks directly?
 

Steve Mercer

Old-Salt
Your post makes no sense whatsoever.
If the yanks needed his expertise, why was he attached to the Aussies and not the yanks directly?
I dont know , just tellin you what he told me , I guess he could only be attach to common wealth army as a Brit ? So not the septics
 
I dont know , just tellin you what he told me , I guess he could only be attach to common wealth army as a Brit ? So not the septics
Then it would be very unlikely that he would not have been doing anything for the yanks.
 
Met an old fella once who said he was in signals and got sent to Vietnam attach to Aussie army , the yanks needed his lot as they only ones with the tech to pin point the Congs morter position s
But you weren't there, man.
 
Met an old fella once who said he was in signals and got sent to Vietnam attach to Aussie army , the yanks needed his lot as they only ones with the tech to pin point the Congs morter position s
He was spinning you a tale. The PM at the time, Harold Wilson specifically banned any British Forces from going to Vietnam and carrying out any combat related actions such as described in your post, as the last 90 pages have evidenced.

If you were British Forces who wanted to serve in Vietnam the easiest way was to go to Australia House in London and enlist directly (not attached) in the Australian Army and go to Australia. If your Australian army unit was due to tour Vietnam then it is likely you would be touring with it.
 
Met an old fella once who said he was in signals and got sent to Vietnam attach to Aussie army , the yanks needed his lot as they only ones with the tech to pin point the Congs morter position s
If that ever happened and it's a big if to the point of zero chance, the British expertise in counter mortar/counter battery technology during that period was the Royal Artillery with its Green Archer radar.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
Interesting article about the US Marines during the Battle of Hue City during the 1968 Tet Offensive. One of the Marines profiled is Glasgow-born Eric Henshall.

What a fabulous read.

I saw McCullen's exhibition at the Tate in London last year. It covered Vietnam, Biafra, Northern Ireland and the UK's industrial decline in the 1970s/80s.

It wasn't an easy exhibition; I think we were there about three hours and it was - on some emotional levels - bloody hard work. Nevertheless, it was an unmissable display and body of work.

So, it's nice to have read that as an adjunct. Thank you.
 

yank_eyetie

Old-Salt
What a fabulous read.

I saw McCullen's exhibition at the Tate in London last year. It covered Vietnam, Biafra, Northern Ireland and the UK's industrial decline in the 1970s/80s.

It wasn't an easy exhibition; I think we were there about three hours and it was - on some emotional levels - bloody hard work. Nevertheless, it was an unmissable display and body of work.

So, it's nice to have read that as an adjunct. Thank you.
You're welcome! I am glad you appreciated it. What I thought was interesting was that the article was written by a Brit (Anthony Lyod) about a Brit (Sir Don McCullin) in an American war, and they find a Brit immigrant (Eric Henshall).
 

Bodenplatte

Old-Salt
Met an old fella once who said he was in signals and got sent to Vietnam attach to Aussie army , the yanks needed his lot as they only ones with the tech to pin point the Congs morter position s
About 2010 I received an urgent call from a solicitor acquaintance who was acting as executor for a client who had died in South Africa. Solicitor was at the UK residence of this person. He was very concerned about something he had found in the attic.

I turned up at the address pronto, and was shown a sturdy wooden packing case marked up with stencils indicating that it had originally contained some sort of rocket, property of the US Air Force. The case actually contained a pristine M14 rifle, two mags, and 20 rounds of 7.62mm NATO. I was able to assure my acquaintance that it was most definitely not a Daisy Air Rifle, and that it was in a safe condition. (For anybody who doesn't know, the M14 was the rifle with which the US Army and Marines were equipped from the mid 1950s and still had during the early days of their overt involvement in Vietnam, before being re-equipped with the M16.)

Police were called, read the situation very sensibly, no drama, took the rifle away, but carried out a tidy search next day, as there was an empty shoulder holster in the packing case as well. They subsequently told us that the National Ballistics Intelligence Service (a police set-up operating out of the West Midlands somewhere) had nabbed the M14 for their reference collection.

Anyway, there were two long-time neighbours present - maybe they were joint executors, I never asked - but they had known the deceased for a long time. They said that he had been in the Royal Signals, and then " been taken on by Marconi and sent to Vietnam to work with the Yanks."

Having read the post by @Steve Mercer I am prompted to wonder if there might be something in his question.
 
They said that he had been in the Royal Signals, and then " been taken on by Marconi and sent to Vietnam to work with the Yanks."
Reading that, it means that ha had left the Royal Signals and then gone to work for Marconi as a civilian, and was working for them as a civilian in Vietnam. A bit different to a serving member of the Royal Signals going on operations in Vietnam with US and ANZAC forces.
 

Bodenplatte

Old-Salt
Reading that, it means that ha had left the Royal Signals and then gone to work for Marconi as a civilian, and was working for them as a civilian in Vietnam. A bit different to a serving member of the Royal Signals going on operations in Vietnam with US and ANZAC forces.
Think about it.
 
Slight thread drift, There was an article on PPRuNe a while back about 20 Sqn RAF ( then based in Singapore) being deployed to Chiang Mai in Thailand in (IIRC) 1962 with Hunters in the run-up to the "official" start to the Vietnam war, when "US advisors" and various CIA types were active in neighbouring Laos (and Vietnam).

Also involved were 48 Sqn RAF with Hastings (again based in Singapore). Apparently missions that did not appear in log books were flights from Don Muang RTAFB (Royal Thai Air Force Base) to Chiang Mai that allegedly involved entering Lao airspace due to "equipment failure" and the inference was these were airdrops to the New Zealand SAS and others whilst in Lao airspace. This was stopped after a short while as the Americans fretted about any potential RAF aircraft losses in Lao airspace.

At the time, the Americans were in Laos ' in the black', as for the RAF....

Apparently a number of the 20 Sqn personnel returned to Singapore with various " tropical diseases". Not VD, no, siree perish the thought.
 
Slight thread drift, There was an article on PPRuNe a while back about 20 Sqn RAF ( then based in Singapore) being deployed to Chiang Mai in Thailand in (IIRC) 1962 with Hunters in the run-up to the "official" start to the Vietnam war, when "US advisors" and various CIA types were active in neighbouring Laos (and Vietnam).

Also involved were 48 Sqn RAF with Hastings (again based in Singapore). Apparently missions that did not appear in log books were flights from Don Muang RTAFB (Royal Thai Air Force Base) to Chiang Mai that allegedly involved entering Lao airspace due to "equipment failure" and the inference was these were airdrops to the New Zealand SAS and others whilst in Lao airspace. This was stopped after a short while as the Americans fretted about any potential RAF aircraft losses in Lao airspace.

At the time, the Americans were in Laos ' in the black', as for the RAF....

Apparently a number of the 20 Sqn personnel returned to Singapore with various " tropical diseases". Not VD, no, siree perish the thought.
My bold, I refer you to this excerpt from wiki.
This is almost word for word from a book I have on the NZSAS, called The first 50 years, so it is possible that they were receiving airdrops from the RAF, although being under US control I would have thought that the yanks would have been doing that sort of thing.

At the request of the Royal Thai Government a detachment of 30 men were stationed in Thailand from 2 June to 16 September 1962 during the Laotian crisis.[35] The detachment was split into two Troops, with one working with United States Special Forces and the Marines at Udon in the north-east and the other deployed with a reinforced United States Army battle group at Khao in the central region.[36] Neither Troop took part in any operations involving action against the enemy, but the deployment provided the detachment with an opportunity to train in jungle and mounted operations while working with American and Thai forces.
 

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