Did any British Forces Serve In Vietnam?

The link here takes you to a PhD thesis on the history of the New Zealand SAS. Definitely worth a read, and it helps debunk the "British SAS seconded to Australian/New Zealand SAS" myth.

https://mro.massey.ac.nz/bitstream/handle/10179/1242/02whole.pdf
It has taken me some hours to read through that link.
The period of time that it covers was during my time of service.
I knew at least 95% of the NZ personnel mentioned, a lot of whom are no longer on this planet.
It is a fair and accurate dissertation of the events that occurred during that period concerning the NZ SAS.
The only mention that I saw of Brits serving in VN came during the 3rd rotation of 4 troop in so much the Aussie 2IC was ex Brit special forces.

Edit to add

There was mention made of an Aussie trooper falling from a quick extraction rope.
His body was never recovered at the time and sometime in the last 5 years or so, his remains were recovered and repatriated to Australia.
 
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Still ploughing through through it. Interestingly (well for me anyway) my former in country manager from when I worked for a PMC in 1994 appears in the footnotes as the source of information.
 
Had great R&R in HK--fond memories of Royal HK Yacht Club sailing Bombardiers over in Repulse Bay and bought my GMT Master at the old China Fleet Club.

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I was in Singapore in '71 when many of your gents came into town. BugIs Street was the usual rv for the Kiwi, Oz, Brit central challenge for the 'noughts and crosses' sessions for the local teens amongst many other attractions.
 
I was in Singapore in '71 when many of your gents came into town. BugIs Street was the usual rv for the Kiwi, Oz, Brit central challenge for the 'noughts and crosses' sessions for the local teens amongst many other attractions.
Did you ever win a game?

No, I thought not.
 
I worked 'Long time Hong Kong' and saw the U.S. troops arrive for R&R, my how they earned it and HK did it's best for them.
A US Mil C130 failed to land properly at Kai Tak HK, it was1965 I think , it was a very difficult landing place, the plane careered off into the sea killing 58 US lads coming in for R&R. (I think I have this right?)
 

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LE
Kit Reviewer
"Wan Dolla MPC" could buy a lot, a "numbah wan shoeshine" of maybe a cold Coke if you were lucky.
Military payment certificates were issued in lieu of U.S. Greenbacks. One dollar MPC brought 320 Dong at the legitimate exchange rate, one dollar green could bring over 700 Dong on the black market.


The five cent MPC at left represents about 34 minutes of your combat pay. We got $65 a month for being exposed to "hostile fire." That comes to 8.9 cents an hour.
Vietnamese Piastres or Dong, the 500 Dong note at right was worth about $3 MPC at the legitimate exchange rate. Compare this note to the Dong used by the NVA, (below



Some examples of MPC and comment on what it could buy.
The MPC series was changed at irregular intervals supposedly so the locals could not amass any, but like anything else, they found ways around it.
I could survive very well on $40.00 a month. All the booze and cigarettes that I could consume.
There was nothing else to spend money on.
A carton of 24 cans of Aussie beer was $2.40 and a pack of 200 cigarettes was $2.00, a large bottle of spirits (whiskey, vodka etc)
was $2.40.
A quick raid on the ration store at 2230hrs for a snack and nothing more was needed.
 
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Johnson pleaded with Harold Wilson to send to Vietnam just the Black Watch, but he refused.

The Australians with their SLRs punching through dense jungle foliage where 5.56mms feared to tread, racked up quite a body-count of Zips in the wire.

As we know fom the experience of the Chindits, even starkers, Englishmen take to the jungle like ducks to water.

How would the Watch have best been deployed to chalk up an even higher number of dead Charlie?

 
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Johnson pleaded with Harold Wilson to send to Vietnam just the Black Watch, but he refused.

The Australians with their SLRs punching through dense jungle foliage where 5.56mms feared to tread, racked up quite a body-count of Zips in the wire.

As we know fom the experience of the Chindits, even starkers, Englishmen take to the jungle like ducks to water.

How would the Watch have best been deployed to chalk up an even higher number of dead Charlie?

Which wire was this that you are referring to.
 
Johnson pleaded with Harold Wilson to send to Vietnam just the Black Watch, but he refused.

How would the Watch have best been deployed to chalk up an even higher number of dead Charlie?
The whole "asking for the Black Watch" affair has been explained in this thread already. Johnson didn't plead with Harold Wilson for anything, although he would not have turned away British political support for the Free World effort.

The Brits did do sterling work helping its SEATO allies, especially the Thais, while the war was going on.

Cheers,
Dan.
 
Had he not been assassinated, would Gaitskell have acceded to an American plea for British troops? Would he have sent a whole division, including Canberras & V bombers?

 
Had he not been assassinated, would Gaitskell have acceded to an American plea for British troops? Would he have sent a whole division, including Canberras & V bombers?

You still have not given an explanation of all this killing in the wire statement is about, or is it just more of your bullshit.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Johnson pleaded with Harold Wilson to send to Vietnam just the Black Watch, but he refused.

The Australians with their SLRs punching through dense jungle foliage where 5.56mms feared to tread, racked up quite a body-count of Zips in the wire.

As we know fom the experience of the Chindits, even starkers, Englishmen take to the jungle like ducks to water.

How would the Watch have best been deployed to chalk up an even higher number of dead Charlie?

Had he not been assassinated, would Gaitskell have acceded to an American plea for British troops? Would he have sent a whole division, including Canberras & V bombers?

It's Thursday night, you've been sniffing the barmaid's apron.
 
Had great R&R in HK--fond memories of Royal HK Yacht Club sailing Bombardiers over in Repulse Bay and bought my GMT Master at the old China Fleet Club.

View attachment 352606
I would guess that was the old six-storey China Fleet Club with bars etc on the ground floor, a plethora of mini-stalls selling all sorts of stuff on the first floor and cabins for visiting RN personnel above that.

One of the great financial success stories for a Services charitable trust. First they sold 'the air above' the club to a HK company who rebuilt it umpteen storeys high with the bottom few going to the CFC. Then when we left HK the CFC floors were sold on to the same company.

With the proceeds today's China Fleet Club in Saltash, Cornwall, on the banks of the Tamar, was built including 18 hole golf course, swimming pool, spa, gym, bars and restaurant. Appropriate considering the HK site was just along the road from HM Naval Base, cap-tally "HMS Tamar".
 

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