Diabetes, PLEASE READ.

#81
New values are here

I don't always need to test. if I start feeling the shakes, normally a tingling feeling in my upper arms, I think back over the last couple of hours. If everything has been normal routine, I sit it out for five minutes. If I feel worse, even after a drink, or a snack, then something is wrong and I check. Sometimes its needed, but if the routine and food intake are normal, then the levels will not get dangerously low, and it is just my brain craving sugar - a false alarm. I'm not beholden to my meter, I sometimes go a month without using it. I'm pretty good at working it out by feel.

Three times in the last month, I've had the tingle. The first time, I took a couple of Haribo. The other two, a glass of water. The Haribo moment went on longer than the water moments.
 
#82
No,HbA1c is now reported in millimoles (mmol) under IFCC (International Federation of Clinical Chemists) guidelines to bring us into line with the rest of the world (except the US) and not the old DCCT which reported in %. There is a converter on www.diabetes.co.uk that you can use to convert if you wish.
Eg. HbA1c 5% will be 31 mmol.
7% will be 53 mmol which is what you want to be less than if you want to keep your Doc happy.
Hba1c is a measure of what your blood glucose level has been over the last three months. So if you are reading less than 53 then your glucose control has been very good.

Thank you for the reply, is this new reporting in mmol new, I have not been checked for a year, due my annual check up in the next month or so

Archie
 
#83
We've been reporting mmol for about three years now and for a year or so before that we reported both. Your diabetic nurse should be able to give you a little conversion chart you can use until you get used to mmol. Or you can use the link I've provided. At our hospital diabetic clinic the docs still ask for the % along with the mmol but that's because a couple of them are nearing retirement...
 
#84
New values are here

I don't always need to test. if I start feeling the shakes, normally a tingling feeling in my upper arms, I think back over the last couple of hours. If everything has been normal routine, I sit it out for five minutes. If I feel worse, even after a drink, or a snack, then something is wrong and I check. Sometimes its needed, but if the routine and food intake are normal, then the levels will not get dangerously low, and it is just my brain craving sugar - a false alarm. I'm not beholden to my meter, I sometimes go a month without using it. I'm pretty good at working it out by feel.

Three times in the last month, I've had the tingle. The first time, I took a couple of Haribo. The other two, a glass of water. The Haribo moment went on longer than the water moments.

I cannot go a day without monitoring, I know when I start to hypo but have a battle to stay under a reading of 8. I just have to look at food for my blood sugars rise.

Even with a low GI diet no alcohol no fried or roast no carbohydrates no take always its a struggle, as soon a anything food wise passes my mouth the blood sugars spike and stay there for some time

On my Accu-Chek avia my Diabetic nurse told me I have to stay between 4 and 8

The surgery has just changed me over to Nexus Mini Lite I suppose the test strips are cheaper

Archie
 
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#85
Recently had my HbA1c and it came in at 57. My doc is happy with that because at the time I was recovering from flu, was mildly anaemic, had a chest infection for which I was taking anti-biotics and undergoing physio for a back injury..... and it was only 4 weeks after Christmas!! All my previous tests have been in the 42 - 46 range, so once I get back to regular gym sessions and the Christmas spike is out of the way I hope to be back in the correct window. At the moment, I test three times a week after any meal and my blood sugar levels are in single (old units) figures.
 
#86
I have hypothyroidism (rare in blokes 1:10,000) so have blood tests every 6 months, I only found out after I couldn't recover from gym sessions and couldn't lose weight.
I’m with you on that. I take levothyroxin and have found it was quite tricky to get the right dose but once steady I started to lose weight after gym sessions but not as much as others around me.
 
#87
Recently had my HbA1c and it came in at 57. My doc is happy with that because at the time I was recovering from flu, was mildly anaemic, had a chest infection for which I was taking anti-biotics and undergoing physio for a back injury..... and it was only 4 weeks after Christmas!! All my previous tests have been in the 42 - 46 range, so once I get back to regular gym sessions and the Christmas spike is out of the way I hope to be back in the correct window. At the moment, I test three times a week after any meal and my blood sugar levels are in single (old units) figures.
A blip like that is no big deal. If you are in the range 42 - 46 mmol for HbA1c it means your blood glucose is controlled very well. Ps your glucose has always been reported in mmol/L. It's just the HbA1c units that have changed.
 
#88
I’m with you on that. I take levothyroxin and have found it was quite tricky to get the right dose but once steady I started to lose weight after gym sessions but not as much as others around me.
I have been up and down now on a 100, still have bad days though
 
#89
First time out in the mountains since having a diabetic coma, only carrying about 20kg of gear (9kg of that being one camera lens...) and managed about 5 hours exercise going up Moel Siabod

Only necking a litre of water along the way

Wanted to do more but my legs suddenly got very tired and I had to call a day

Pieabeties is a bitch when you're old, just when you're body is screaming for carbs you can't do it
 
#90
I have looked at this thread a couple of times and would like to draw your attention to a device that has come out of Germany, which I am involved with, and is raising a lot of interest in treatments for a range of illnesses and one is that of diabetes.

The machine works by working with the micro-cardiovascular system which represents three-quarters of our system, stimulating the micro-capillaries to pass the red-blood globules to the cells, cleaning them and oxygenating them, and giving the body up to 30% more oxygen.

When used solo the machine is a very good stimulus and preventive medicine, which is what I use it for. But when combined with medical treatment as an adjunct it has a positive effect on that treatment and studies have shown that it aids either recovery or health levels in each and every case.

As a help with diabetes it has been shown to lessen the effects, and in cases improve the health of the sufferer, while in other cases avoiding what may have been an amputation. They are quite interested in this in Germany as they have estimated that fairly soon one in five Germans will have a form of diabetes.

In each case the quality of life of the individual has improved.



The Bemer has undergone a number of tests in Germany and comes with the approval of the medical fraternity there.

I'll provide a couple of basic links which are quite general as it has a benefit in a wide range of problems but if you wish to know more then please PM me and I will send more information that you might find of interest.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d9p2-iGMDOo&t=69s


 
#91
Please find below a link

Diabetes UK

Trouble is it sneaks up on you so you don't know you have it until it is too late in some cases, a lot can be preventable, cut back on the cakes and sweets, cut out processed food, lose a stone or two, walk to work, cycle for 30 minutes around the neighbourhood. All this will help, and if you do find you have it then do as you are asked by the medical profession. It will save you from ending up in a premature grave.
I took a look at the forum and it seems a low carb high fat diet is pretty well known among the diabetic community now.

We do the low carb thing, not because we're diabetic, but because we think it's a healthier way to eat.

Great Ted Talk on the subject here:


Not sure if it's suitable for type 1 diabetics though.
 
#92
[QUOTE="lokiuk, post: 8593935, member: 137944"
Pieabeties is a bitch when you're old, just when you're body is screaming for carbs you can't do it[/QUOTE]

You can because you don't have to use carbs are your primary source of fuel.
 
#93
When I was diagnosed the NHS were still handing out the 'food pyramid' guff where a large portion of every day's meals was to be made of from carbs. Being both cynical and curious it seemed to me that eating lots of carbs, which turn straight into glucose when digested, was nonsense so I bought a meter and spent a couple of months testing after every meal and first thing in the morning. Turns out the lots of carbs thing is nonsense and will lead you down the road to insulin, blindness and amputations.
 
#94
I took a look at the forum and it seems a low carb high fat diet is pretty well known among the diabetic community now.

We do the low carb thing, not because we're diabetic, but because we think it's a healthier way to eat.

Great Ted Talk on the subject here:


Not sure if it's suitable for type 1 diabetics though.
Its an interesting video this one. I recently cut sugar from my diet, mainly as i don't have a sweet tooth and also cut carbs out.
I'm not diabetic but by christ what a difference !!! more energy and not feeling heavily full after eating.
Best bit? i took up running again, i was a bit worried about the carb deficit thing but soon got over it. Some pretty good advice you gave.
 
#95
Its an interesting video this one. I recently cut sugar from my diet, mainly as i don't have a sweet tooth and also cut carbs out.
I'm not diabetic but by christ what a difference !!! more energy and not feeling heavily full after eating.
Best bit? i took up running again, i was a bit worried about the carb deficit thing but soon got over it. Some pretty good advice you gave.
I feel sharper, mentally, even if I'm a Geordie. My No 2s are generally very healthy too; nice and firm and have very little nasty smell.

I still eat chocolate/cake, but only about once-a-week; twice if I'm being really naughty. That's as wild as I get these days.
 
#97
For the last couple of years I’ve been involved in a camel milk business that makes skincare products from raw camel milk. Along the way, we’ve met some eminent scientists in Dubai, Israel and India who are advocates for drinking camel milk to manage blood sugar levels.

A litre of camel milk contains 52 units of an insulin equivalent protein. There are numerous trials around and some detailed analysis of very low diabetes levels amongst populations in which camel milk is a staple.

I’m not diabetic, so I haven’t done much reading on the specifics of camel milk and diabetes. I do, however, have a friend who is Type 1 and uses camel milk to reduce his demand.

I’d say it’s worth reading about. It’s not the kind of thing you will find NHS GPS or specialists having any knowledge of; dig further.

But how do you source camel milk in the UK? Easy; Asda sell tinned camel milk from Dubai and there are multiple sources of freeze dried milk.
 
#98
[QUOTE="lokiuk, post: 8593935, member: 137944"
Pieabeties is a bitch when you're old, just when you're body is screaming for carbs you can't do it
You can because you don't have to use carbs are your primary source of fuel.[/QUOTE]

I know that, pity my body doesn't

I've lost weight, it's the fitness part I struggle with

Ignoring my knackered body for a moment, I simply don't have the energy without carbs, I can cut them down a lot but exercise becomes a struggle

I know we change as we get older, but I find a damn sight easier to lose weight than to get my fitness back
 
#99
Ignoring my knackered body for a moment, I simply don't have the energy without carbs, I can cut them down a lot but exercise becomes a struggle

I know we change as we get older, but I find a damn sight easier to lose weight than to get my fitness back
It's quite a big subject, but in a nutshell, decades of being primarily carb fueled have impaired your fat-burning energy pathways so that you will struggle with exercise if you don't have enough glycogen (carb fuel) in your muscles.

But you can change this by eating a low carb diet, forcing your body to utilise fat for fuel and over time you will become better at using fat for fuel and less dependent on carbohydrates. Yes, you might feel low on energy for a week or thrice, but ultimately you will have far more energy than you have now.

Wor Lass and myself both do this primarily because we're endurance runners (her more than I; she runs ultramarathons and often wins them). Glycogen is a limited resource, fat is almost unlimited, so for the purposes of endurance, fat is the ideal fuel to use.

Combine a low carb high fat diet with low heart rate training and you're onto a winner.

Running on Keto: The MAF Method
 
I read a report saying people with known Type 2 Diabetes are almost outnumbered by Type 2 Diabetes people who don't know.
 

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