DH-9 takes to the air

All those that may be interested, the newly restored Airco DH9 will be flying again on the 22nd June at IWM Duxford.

DH9 Article
 
For those that wondered what all the fuss is about, here is the DH9 going through its paces at Duxford this afternoon. This is probably the rarest airframe in the world.

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Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
Did it loop the loop:?
Quite a remarkable story, I really like these old WW1 planes.
 
The old wartime Airco factory was on the Edgware Road in Colindale. I don't think that the company lasted for very long after the cessation of hostilities. Their chief designer, Sir Geoffrey de Havilland (hence DH), went on to start the de Havilland Aircraft Company at the Stag Lane aerodrome nearby. I think that they moved on to Hatfield in the 1930s, but there were still some residual production facilities at Stag Lane until not that long ago.
 
Did it loop the loop:?
Quite a remarkable story, I really like these old WW1 planes.
No loop the loop, but was in the air for half an hour. Felt privileged to be one of the first to see it back in the sky.
 
Last 3 before I bore you all to death

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The DH9 was regarded with some suspicion by its plots, mainly because of a crappy engine. One of the wittier ones described it as a DH4 that had been officially interfered with.
 
The DH9 was regarded with some suspicion by its plots, mainly because of a crappy engine. One of the wittier ones described it as a DH4 that had been officially interfered with.
Yes, but when re-engined as the DH9a with the 400hp US Liberty, it was one of the best designs of WWI. The issue with the DH4 was the distance between the cockpits, making crew communication almost impossible. With back-to-back cockpits, the DH9 solved that problem, and then the 'late-comers' provided the engine to make the DH9a.
 
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The DH9 was regarded with some suspicion by its plots, mainly because of a crappy engine. One of the wittier ones described it as a DH4 that had been officially interfered with.

The DH.9A made it what it should be by using the Liberty engine, giving it a higher speed, service ceiling & bomb load.
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
Magnificent indeed.
 
So that's what I saw flying as I drove back from a client site.
 
The old wartime Airco factory was on the Edgware Road in Colindale. I don't think that the company lasted for very long after the cessation of hostilities. Their chief designer, Sir Geoffrey de Havilland (hence DH), went on to start the de Havilland Aircraft Company at the Stag Lane aerodrome nearby. I think that they moved on to Hatfield in the 1930s, but there were still some residual production facilities at Stag Lane until not that long ago.
I might be a little confused but was the site for a time a film studio and a pub/club in the 80's? If so I have a bit of history about the site
 
I might be a little confused but was the site for a time a film studio and a pub/club in the 80's? If so I have a bit of history about the site
The Stag Lane site was housing by then, although there was a pub called the Flying Eagle very near. The Airco factory was Frigidaire and then a GPO/Telecom depot.
It was then redeveloped into the Yaohan Plaza and now Asda, Morrisons an Oriental food court and housing.
 
The Stag Lane site was housing by then, although there was a pub called the Flying Eagle very near. The Airco factory was Frigidaire and then a GPO/Telecom depot.
It was then redeveloped into the Yaohan Plaza and now Asda, Morrisons an Oriental food court and housing.
Correct. General Motors (of which Frigidaire was a division) took over much of the site, along with Phoenix Telephone & Electric. About the only thing that remains of the original Airco site is the admin office building, which now houses a school.

I might be a little confused but was the site for a time a film studio and a pub/club in the 80's? If so I have a bit of history about the site
Film Studio? Well, the old Leavesden Aerodrome near Watford is now partly film studios. It was also a de Havilland production site (I think it was managed by London Transport), but that site was WW2 vintage. Down the Edgware Road from Airco were the Stoll Studios in Cricklewood. They were across the road from the old Handley Page factory and airfield.

I have no doubt that Airco aircraft would have been built at sites other than their own factory. Other factories would have been put to use constructing parts and aircraft as was the practice during wartime. You mentioned Waring & Gillow. I think that they had a factory in Hammersmith engaged in such work.
 
Correct. General Motors (of which Frigidaire was a division) took over much of the site, along with Phoenix Telephone & Electric. About the only thing that remains of the original Airco site is the admin office building, which now houses a school.



Film Studio? Well, the old Leavesden Aerodrome near Watford is now partly film studios. It was also a de Havilland production site (I think it was managed by London Transport), but that site was WW2 vintage. Down the Edgware Road from Airco were the Stoll Studios in Cricklewood. They were across the road from the old Handley Page factory and airfield.

I have no doubt that Airco aircraft would have been built at sites other than their own factory. Other factories would have been put to use constructing parts and aircraft as was the practice during wartime. You mentioned Waring & Gillow. I think that they had a factory in Hammersmith engaged in such work.
There were a lot of contractors producing DH.9s apart from Airco; The Alliance Aeroplane Co., F.W. Berwick & Co., Mann, Egerton & Co., National Aircraft Factories Nos. 1 and 2, Short Bros, The Vulcan Motor and Engineering Co., Waring & Gillow Ltd., G.J Weir Ltd., Westland Aircraft and Whitehead Aircraft Co.
 
From 1929 until 1970 Handley Page were at Radlett, further up the A5. There was a pub there, now gone.
Yes, they moved out their main centre of operations out of town in the same way as did de Havilland. I have an idea that Handley Page hung on to their Cricklewood factory building for some time after the move, but I think that the airfield was given over to housing development.
 
I might be a little confused but was the site for a time a film studio and a pub/club in the 80's? If so I have a bit of history about the site
Samuelson's film studios used to be located there and in the eighties they opened "Production Village" a kind of film set type village pub and club complete with village green, pond and ducks.
 

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