Developing psoriasis

Hello everyone.
I am currently an RLC reservist. I work as a chef and am attached to an RE unit. For much of my life, starting from childhood, I have suffered from psoriasis. I joined the reserves at 19 in early 2016 following 6 months of medical appeals of my condition. At the time of my enlistment, my psoriasis was virtually gone, it was extremely mild. Aside from a few minor patches, it was clear. However, in the last two years, my psoriasis has re-surfaced. I have developed several patches on my arms, elbows, back, legs, and on my face. This includes my eyebrows and even under my eyelids. My GP said my current bout was moderate. Recent flare-ups are largely down to some stress. I'm a full-time student at university. Working online during lockdown has been very strenuous. I also find that sweating when exercising or working also causes flare-ups. When in the field, I find insect bites also affect my skin. Certain foods, primarily red meats, nightshades, and dairy are also unfavourable for my condition. Recently, when working at an RLC unit, my condition was noticed. I was informed it was best to seek medical attention. They said it may affect my career in army catering.

I have seen my GP twice, and a military doctor (though they seemed more aware of RN policies on psoriasis). I've been prescribed some medication which has had mixed results. I am due next month to visit the medical personnel up at Redford. There I shall be told if it is permittable to continue working as a chef. I was hoping someone here could tell me what a likely outcome may be. I was told by one of my officers, It's extremely unlikely the army will discharge me. At worst it will be a medical downgrade. I finish uni next year, I would like to go on a tour and aim for promotion. It has been very vexing that I haven't been given a definite answer if I can stay as a chef, or if I may be downgraded. Before I go for an army medical checkup, I would greatly appreciate any information on what the likely outcome may be.
Thank you.
 
Hello everyone.
I am currently an RLC reservist. I work as a chef and am attached to an RE unit. For much of my life, starting from childhood, I have suffered from psoriasis. I joined the reserves at 19 in early 2016 following 6 months of medical appeals of my condition. At the time of my enlistment, my psoriasis was virtually gone, it was extremely mild. Aside from a few minor patches, it was clear. However, in the last two years, my psoriasis has re-surfaced. I have developed several patches on my arms, elbows, back, legs, and on my face. This includes my eyebrows and even under my eyelids. My GP said my current bout was moderate. Recent flare-ups are largely down to some stress. I'm a full-time student at university. Working online during lockdown has been very strenuous. I also find that sweating when exercising or working also causes flare-ups. When in the field, I find insect bites also affect my skin. Certain foods, primarily red meats, nightshades, and dairy are also unfavourable for my condition. Recently, when working at an RLC unit, my condition was noticed. I was informed it was best to seek medical attention. They said it may affect my career in army catering.

I have seen my GP twice, and a military doctor (though they seemed more aware of RN policies on psoriasis). I've been prescribed some medication which has had mixed results. I am due next month to visit the medical personnel up at Redford. There I shall be told if it is permittable to continue working as a chef. I was hoping someone here could tell me what a likely outcome may be. I was told by one of my officers, It's extremely unlikely the army will discharge me. At worst it will be a medical downgrade. I finish uni next year, I would like to go on a tour and aim for promotion. It has been very vexing that I haven't been given a definite answer if I can stay as a chef, or if I may be downgraded. Before I go for an army medical checkup, I would greatly appreciate any information on what the likely outcome may be.
Thank you.


My wife who is a doctor says there is no reason you can't work as a chef as long as you take the proper precautions such as wearing a hairnet and wearing gloves and following all hygiene regulations.

Psoriasis is not contagious so you just need to apply common sense is all. Good luck to you and I hope you get to do want you want to do.
 
This is just an anecdote, though I had a CSM with psoriasis, which looked quite significant/ uncomfortable at times (being a CSM getting your coy through PDT/ a HERRICK tour is obviously quite stressful on top of the usual G1 nonsense), so I can't see how it would cause medical downgrade much less a discharge
 
If current treatments have had mixed results, ask about Stelara. One of the monoclonal antibody based biological treatments, an injection every 12 weeks.

It’s pricey (for the NHS) but it transformed by P (which was particularly bad on my back as it happens)
 
I also suffer from psoriasis and my advice (in addition to the above) is to cut out tomatoes and tomato products. I understand (and my GP told me when I was diagnosed) that they can contribute to psoriasis.

Good luck and hope all work out for you.
 
D

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I also suffer from psoriasis and my advice (in addition to the above) is to cut out tomatoes and tomato products. I understand (and my GP told me when I was diagnosed) that they can contribute to psoriasis.

Good luck and hope all work out for you.
There's no solid evidence that Nightshade type plants do that, but there are plenty of anecdotal stories from people like yourself who say it helped theirs.
 
I also suffer from psoriasis and my advice (in addition to the above) is to cut out tomatoes and tomato products. I understand (and my GP told me when I was diagnosed) that they can contribute to psoriasis.
It would be a shame to have to cut out tomatoes. Processed tomato products such as pastes, pomodoro etc. have some quite remarkable health properties - fresh toms less so, for some reason.
 
I suffered a few years ago with psoriasis, mainly on my upper arms and lower back.

Doctor prescribed a couple of different ointments which were next to useless, but after trying virtually every over the counter unguent, I was recommended to try Ovelle.

Only seems to be available in Sainsburys but it worked like a miracle, and on the plus side its only about £3 for a 500ml pot.
I honestly can't recommend it enough.
 
I developed psoriasis in later life. My mother had it, so I guess it's something in the genes. In my case it has been mild, sporadic and confined, when it appears, to small areas rather than the full Singing Detective experience.
 
D

Deleted 100463

Guest
I developed psoriasis in later life. My mother had it, so I guess it's something in the genes. In my case it has been mild, sporadic and confined, when it appears, to small areas rather than the full Singing Detective experience.
Yes there is a genetic link to the causing of psoriasis. Though the majority of people who develop it don't report a family history, so heritability isn't 100% clear.
 

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