Desertion rate has doubled since start of war in Iraq

Discussion in 'Current Affairs, News and Analysis' started by armchair_jihad, Aug 13, 2006.

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  1. THE number of soldiers dismissed from the army for desertion or classified as long-term absent without leave (Awol) has more than doubled since the start of the Iraq war three years ago.

    New figures released by the Ministry of Defence last week show that 2,030 soldiers went missing from their units between 2003 and 2005 and were later dismissed by the service. A further 740 are on the run but have not yet been kicked out.

    Over the previous three years there were 1,130 dismissals.

    Article in full also include item about budget cuts,,2087-2310624,00.html
  2. Is it desertion or is it "premature premature voluntary release?" :twisted: "They" don't seem to be doing much about it.
  3. I think its Toms who are abandoned by their Country and undermined by their communities
  4. Unacknowledged overstretch = doubling of desertion rate.
  5. nonono the forces are 'stretched but over stretched' repeat after me....
  6. Kept away from families and friends for months and months on end, bounced from tour to tour, being shot at and IED'd for a political cause they're not even sure about...

    ...I've no idea why anyone would go AWOL.
  7. I'm not sure if our rate of desertion has doubled, but I am pretty sure that it is a lot higher than it was in 2002. Odd thing about it is that it never makes the news unless a deserter does something illegal, or comes out in the press with allegations against the military.

    I actually have a little sympathy for people who joined before the Bush Crusade, but very little for those that knew they might be sent and decided they didn't like that idea. As to the ones who desert after serving one or more tours 'over there' . . . I have to wonder if there isn't some wrong with the whole picture.
  8. One of the reasons it never makes the news is that someone who goes absent is designated awol until they are arrested or return, so although long-term AWOLs are effectively deserters they never actually get called that at any point unless they come back or are caught. The vast majority are written off while still designated as AWOL, even though it is patently clear they have no intention to return. The statistics are also extraordinarily complex.