derogatory

#1
on some of these social website type places the software recognizes and deletes some words that are considered offensive. Do people have suggestions for derogatory terms that might have escaped the filters ?
 
#5
numpty, though that is now in the dictionary.

Shakespeare may be a rich vein, and Chaucer.
 
#8
Shakespear Insults.jpg
 
#10
Just swear in any one of a number of foreign languages, you know the target is going to google the word to find out what it means.
So you get to insult them and get past the filters.

Insults in all languages! :: MyInsults.com
 
#11
How about: c#nt, pr1ck, tw4tface, kn0b jockey, sh33p sh4gger, m0ng, c0ck, greasewarden. Pretty sure most of those will get through.
 
#14
This has got to be one of, if not the, worst most dullest thread I've ever fucking read. I'm actually looking forward to going on night shift now. Fucking DULL!
 
#15
Dingleberry you snottycockedfuckwit.
 
#17
This has got to be one of, if not the, worst most dullest thread I've ever fucking read. I'm actually looking forward to going on night shift now. Fucking DULL!
I'll save it!

Only yesterday Pakistan issued guidance for naughty words to be deleted from text messages.

Full article here: Butt out! Pakistan telecom watchdog drafts rude text message ban | World news | The Guardian

Guardians of linguistic purity have long warned against the pernicious impact that text messaging may have on the young, but Pakistan officials have taken such concerns to a new extreme by demanding that mobile phone operators block all text messages using offensive words.

With a creativity and dedication to the task unusual for local officialdom, the country's telecoms regulator has issued a list of more than 1000 words and phrases which will be banned.

After serious deliberation and consultation, officials from the Pakistan Telecommunication Authority (PTA) have come up with more than 50 phrases using the word "fuck" and 17 involving "butt".

The list includes several apparently innocuous words and phrases, including "flatulence", "deposit" and "fondle". Others would likely only make sense to frustrated teenagers.

Among the more printable terms are "strap-on", "beat your meat", "crotch rot", "love pistol", "pocket pool" and "quickie".

The officials' flair for the task was apparent, with prohibition embracing more figurative language, such as "flogging the dolphin", and 51 terms with the suffix "ass" – although only one variation of the word 'arse'. There were 17 variants on "tit" and 33 on "cock", with officials managing to produce eight obscenities involving the word "foot".

Mobile phone firms were ordered to stop messages including the offending words this week, although tests by the Guardian suggested the blocking technology was not 100% effective.

While admitting that Pakistan's constitution guaranteed free speech, the regulator told mobile phone companies that such freedom was "not unrestricted" under court rulings. Furthermore, said the telecom watchdog, they had obligations under their licences to prevent "obnoxious communication".

In the letter to mobile phone firms, watchdog director Muhammad Talib Doger said "the system should be implemented within seven days ... and a report submitted to PTA on monthly basis on the number of blocked SMSs".

The list was attached to the letter, with 1,109 words and phrases in English to be banned and 586 in the national language, Urdu, a tongue that also offers many rich possibilities for abuse. The watchdog has yet to tackle obscenity in Pakistan's four main regional languages, including the raucous Punjabi.

Despite being a less-developed country, mobile phones are used widely across society, even in remote villages.

Mohammad Younis, a spokesman for the PTA, said the ban was "the result of numerous meetings and consultations with stakeholders" after consumers complained of receiving offensive text messages. He said the list was not finished and the authority would continue to add to it.

"Nobody would like this happening to their young boy or girl," said Younis.

Mobile operators expect the PTA to fine them for any banned words that get through, which means that they will have to cut the connection of customers who persistently try to send such messages.
Pakistan continues its downwards spiral into medieval obscurity...
 
#18
So, their consultation consisted of some Pakistanis spending the day thinking up naughty words, then they decided to censor out most the fuckin Oxford Dictionary anyway to please a few 'stakeholders'...

'While admitting that Pakistan's constitution guaranteed free speech, the regulator told mobile phone companies that such freedom was "not unrestricted" under court rulings.'
In other words, they don't have free speech.
 
#19
"Duller than a nightshift" will probably get through, until it goes viral and gets banned.
 
#20
Crevice.
 
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