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Depressed? Go to war.

#1
From the BBC:

Troops studied for effects of war

The 16 Air Assault Brigade includes three battalions of paratroopers
Going to war is not necessarily bad for a soldier's psychological health, new research suggests.
In a study hundreds of soldiers from Colchester, Essex, were questioned after months of deployment in Iraq.

Researchers found no deterioration in their mental health and actually saw a significant relative improvement in their psychological well-being.

The study by a team from King's College London is published in the British Journal of Psychiatry.

The researchers analysed questionnaires from 421 members of the Colchester-based 16 Air Assault Brigade.

'High morale'

The servicemen and women were questioned before and after taking part in operations in Iraq for around four months.

The researchers, led by Dr Jamie Hacker Hughes, analysed the psychological scores of the soldiers and concluded that they revealed "a highly significant relative improvement in mental health".

"These findings raise the question of whether military deployment is necessarily bad for psychological health," found the report.

The researchers said it was premature to conclude that the Iraq war had already had a serious adverse effect on the mental health of the armed forces.

"This study also reminds us that where there are highly selected forces with high morale...participation in war fighting may sometimes not necessarily be as deleterious to psychological well-being as has previously been thought," they concluded.

Another study published in the same journal found that adjustment difficulties, rather than combat stress, appeared to be the main causes of psychiatric illness in troops.
I think I'll stick to whisky and prozac, thanks.

V!
 
E

error_unknown

Guest
#2
I think this report, on the face of it, is spot on. In my experience, when on operations I'm alert, focused and positive; it's adjusting back to a normal tempo of life which is more problematic, particularly when I can't make my wife and kids jump to attention and salute when I enter the ops room... er... I mean the kitchen in the morning.
 
#3
Chickpea,

Couldn't agree more. It's very frustrating and stressful returning to the chaotic environment of family life after the relative order and discipline of 6 months on ops. It unbalances the family too, who have clearly got into a routine without you.

UQFEGD
 
#4
pensionpointer said:
It unbalances the family too, who have clearly got into a routine without you.

UQFEGD
what like shagging the family officer and spending your Lssa on crap
 
#5
Vegetius said:
The researchers analysed questionnaires from 421 members of the Colchester-based 16 Air Assault Brigade.
So going on Ops is less depressing than being in Colchester??
 

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