Dentistry amid the Covid19 outbreak, a warning

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer

No sign of anything changing the exodus of dentists from the NHS

Here is an explanation, shamelessly cut and paste from a dental social media site.

"It's not just that so many want to go private, but the lack available associates and good nurses. If you can't supply personnel to service a large list what are your options? If you try and divvy them up between a reduced workforce, you clog up your appointment book to the extent that a smooth workflow and good cashflow is inhibited. Try to speed up or work more hours and you stress out then burn out? If you don't allow them onto your chair until they perceive a problem, then you are deeply into supervised neglect and really shouldn't be sleeping soundly nights. While all this is going on, you have empty treatment rooms and reduced item of service income, fixed costs coming along regardless, inflation going up, particularly wages inflation as you try to retain staff and prospect of double digit mortgage interest rates before the year is out. So what do you do? Go private, downsize that patient list take your foot off the accelerator and breathe. The manpower planing which has caused these problems and the lack of a nimble response from the responsible institutions were not of our making, but it is indeed a pity that the least able in society will suffer, but until we all get better governance in dentistry, what the hell else are supposed to do?"
 

GDog

War Hero

No sign of anything changing the exodus of dentists from the NHS

Here is an explanation, shamelessly cut and paste from a dental social media site.

"It's not just that so many want to go private, but the lack available associates and good nurses. If you can't supply personnel to service a large list what are your options? If you try and divvy them up between a reduced workforce, you clog up your appointment book to the extent that a smooth workflow and good cashflow is inhibited. Try to speed up or work more hours and you stress out then burn out? If you don't allow them onto your chair until they perceive a problem, then you are deeply into supervised neglect and really shouldn't be sleeping soundly nights. While all this is going on, you have empty treatment rooms and reduced item of service income, fixed costs coming along regardless, inflation going up, particularly wages inflation as you try to retain staff and prospect of double digit mortgage interest rates before the year is out. So what do you do? Go private, downsize that patient list take your foot off the accelerator and breathe. The manpower planing which has caused these problems and the lack of a nimble response from the responsible institutions were not of our making, but it is indeed a pity that the least able in society will suffer, but until we all get better governance in dentistry, what the hell else are supposed to do?"
Let them eat cake
 

No sign of anything changing the exodus of dentists from the NHS

Here is an explanation, shamelessly cut and paste from a dental social media site.

"It's not just that so many want to go private, but the lack available associates and good nurses. If you can't supply personnel to service a large list what are your options? If you try and divvy them up between a reduced workforce, you clog up your appointment book to the extent that a smooth workflow and good cashflow is inhibited. Try to speed up or work more hours and you stress out then burn out? If you don't allow them onto your chair until they perceive a problem, then you are deeply into supervised neglect and really shouldn't be sleeping soundly nights. While all this is going on, you have empty treatment rooms and reduced item of service income, fixed costs coming along regardless, inflation going up, particularly wages inflation as you try to retain staff and prospect of double digit mortgage interest rates before the year is out. So what do you do? Go private, downsize that patient list take your foot off the accelerator and breathe. The manpower planing which has caused these problems and the lack of a nimble response from the responsible institutions were not of our making, but it is indeed a pity that the least able in society will suffer, but until we all get better governance in dentistry, what the hell else are supposed to do?"
It seems that neither private dentistry nor NHS currently provide a complete end to end solution for all patients. NHS could do it if the above issues were resolved. Private is taking on more of the load but only routine stuff such as hygiene, fillings, common extractions and in some cases implant work (where the money is). When something looks a bit tricky the patient may be referred to an NHS dental surgery where they have surgeons with plenty of experience in dealing with non routine dental work. If the job has moved in to the medical realm, the patient may be referred to NHS hospital.

If everyone left NHS dentistry, who would deal with the stuff the private dentists can't or won't? It's not just those who can't afford to pay who will suffer.
 

GDog

War Hero
It seems that neither private dentistry nor NHS currently provide a complete end to end solution for all patients. NHS could do it if the above issues were resolved. Private is taking on more of the load but only routine stuff such as hygiene, fillings, common extractions and in some cases implant work (where the money is). When something looks a bit tricky the patient may be referred to an NHS dental surgery where they have surgeons with plenty of experience in dealing with non routine dental work. If the job has moved in to the medical realm, the patient may be referred to NHS hospital.

If everyone left NHS dentistry, who would deal with the stuff the private dentists can't or won't? It's not just those who can't afford to pay who will suffer.
What private dentists "won't" do will be done for the right price.

What they can't do isn't dissimilar to what NHS dentists can't do and typically goes to hospital for a max-fax consultant to look at in hospital. Including private hospitals.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
It seems that neither private dentistry nor NHS currently provide a complete end to end solution for all patients. NHS could do it if the above issues were resolved. Private is taking on more of the load but only routine stuff such as hygiene, fillings, common extractions and in some cases implant work (where the money is). When something looks a bit tricky the patient may be referred to an NHS dental surgery where they have surgeons with plenty of experience in dealing with non routine dental work. If the job has moved in to the medical realm, the patient may be referred to NHS hospital.

If everyone left NHS dentistry, who would deal with the stuff the private dentists can't or won't? It's not just those who can't afford to pay who will suffer.

One of the issues that is underlooked is the patient ratio between NHS and private.

An NHS dentist may have 2000 to 3000 patients on their books. Private will be half that.

So if you have a town of 12000 folk, you might have 4 or 5 NHS dentists who would have a proportion of private patients. They would probably be in 2 practices, one of 3, the other of 2dentists.

If one of them went fully private, even the smaller then suddenly there's a couple of thousand unregistered patients but still the same number of dentists.


There has always been a community dental services to deal with the vulnerable such as learning disabilities, physically disabled etc.

Increasingly however that community dental service has been swamped providing emergency care to unregistered patients making it difficult to fulfil its main role.
 

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