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Dental drill bits

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Following a post on another thread I thought I'd post a wee guide on dental drill bits for modellers who may well find them useful.

Basically we can classify dental burs (the name we call drill bits) in a number of different ways.

Firstly by the type of drill they are designed for.
High speed are small diameter, smooth shaft.
Slow speed slightly larger but have a notch at the end to engage a latch on our handpiece but this does not affect their use in a dremel's type drill
Straight, these are same diameter as slow speed but have a long shank.

Next, is the material of the cutting head. This can be steel, diamond or tungsten carbide. However highspeed are usually diamond or TC, straight usually steel or TC and slowspeed usually steel.

After that we start to talk about the shape. Most common is round and fissure, but also available are rose, pear, rugby ball, wheel, tapered fissure cone, inverted cone. Google dental but chart for examples

As well as regular type burs you can get any number of speciality types. White stone, impregnated rubber polishers of varying shapes, mandrills designed to hold small sandpaper discs in carrying degrees of coarseness.

We have burs for creating pin and post channels in a number of diameters.

Some burs are specifically designed for cutting and polishing acrylic in the form of dentures so will work equally well on plastic.

Locations to purchase such burs include
Search these are general suppliers who stock a variety of ranges but which do a budgetown brand range under the heading undodent
Laboratory Rotary Instrument and Surgery Rotary Instruments these are far higher quality which is reflected in the price

Most dentists will have several drawers full of different burs, worth asking next time you're in just to have a look to see what is all available. We often have old and obscure burs in a back cupboard that were ordered by a previous dentist and never used!
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Following a post on another thread I thought I'd post a wee guide on dental drill bits for modellers who may well find them useful.

Basically we can classify dental burs (the name we call drill bits) in a number of different ways.

Firstly by the type of drill they are designed for.
High speed are small diameter, smooth shaft.
Slow speed slightly larger but have a notch at the end to engage a latch on our handpiece but this does not affect their use in a dremel's type drill
Straight, these are same diameter as slow speed but have a long shank.

Next, is the material of the cutting head. This can be steel, diamond or tungsten carbide. However highspeed are usually diamond or TC, straight usually steel or TC and slowspeed usually steel.

After that we start to talk about the shape. Most common is round and fissure, but also available are rose, pear, rugby ball, wheel, tapered fissure cone, inverted cone. Google dental but chart for examples

As well as regular type burs you can get any number of speciality types. White stone, impregnated rubber polishers of varying shapes, mandrills designed to hold small sandpaper discs in carrying degrees of coarseness.

We have burs for creating pin and post channels in a number of diameters.

Some burs are specifically designed for cutting and polishing acrylic in the form of dentures so will work equally well on plastic.

Locations to purchase such burs include
Search these are general suppliers who stock a variety of ranges but which do a budgetown brand range under the heading undodent
Laboratory Rotary Instrument and Surgery Rotary Instruments these are far higher quality which is reflected in the price

Most dentists will have several drawers full of different burs, worth asking next time you're in just to have a look to see what is all available. We often have old and obscure burs in a back cupboard that were ordered by a previous dentist and never used!
Are they compatible with common handheld rotary tools made by Proxxon or Dremel?
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Are they compatible with common handheld rotary tools made by Proxxon or Dremel?

Never used a proxxon but slow speed and straight definitely work in the smaller chuck of a dremel.

Can't remember off hand if the high speed do
 
1593351607890.jpeg
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Also to mention in the polishing side are a variety of brushes and rubber cups
 

Tyk

LE
My eldest was given a variety of burrs by our dentist when he found out he was making models and using a Dremel, they all seemed to fit just fine, they worked very much better than the Dremel bits available.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
 

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