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Demise of the city centre

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
Not sure the Tories were ahead of the game. The Clean Air Act 1956 was a reaction to London’s Great Smog of 1952 and was a result of a Private Members Bill. Churchill was pretty slow to act on the Great Smog and his hand was rather forced.

That said, there had been some pollution control legislation as far back as early Victorian times, but it only covered industry.

The 1993 Clean Act replaced the 1956 legislation and embodied EU law.
Mine was a sarcastic dig at Remainers who were painting anything good in this country as a result of the EU.

Having gone to school on Teesside, I’m aware of the legislation.
 
I thought that CAZs were tied to EU environmental legislation? Surely we can now breathe in as much pollution as we like?
Dunno but if a council can rip some money off it's citizenry, I don't think a little thing like Brexit will stop them.
 
Dunno but if a council can rip some money off it's citizenry, I don't think a little thing like Brexit will stop them.

Who gets the money from the clean air 50 mph limits on the motorway?, I can't see the income from speed cameras going away
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
And now cashless businesses are becoming increasingly common

The trout who runs the pub at the corner of my street has said she won't ever be taking cash again.

That's going to upset a lot of the builders who make up her trade in normal times.
 

slick

LE
Perhaps but I can't see there's the volume of demand from that market to fill more than a small fraction of the empty floor space that is around now.
Loads of empty office space down this end, multi storeys, waterfront, been empty for ages.
Local shopping area has a small but busy car park, but council has given the go ahead for a "creative space" office building to be stuck right on top of it.
However there is a shortage, and has been for some time, of small (sub 500 sq ft) industrial units in the area. As soon as these come up for lease they are snapped up within days.
No one seems to be joining the dots....
 
And now cashless businesses are becoming increasingly common
As with quite a few things, the pandemic has hastened processes that were already underway.
The people who will mostly be upset by the new arrangements are the very old, those without bank accounts, tax evaders and money launderers.

I could only really give a toss about the very old (unless they also happen to be tax evaders or money launderers).
 
If you can’t trust a kebab shop enough to use a card, why would you trust it’s food safety?

I like to think my lunch time burger from the filthy kebab shop is training for the future world predicted in the film - Demolition Man.

Where those who wish to live as free me are eating rat burgers in a sewer...
 
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As with quite a few things, the pandemic has hastened processes that were already underway.
The people who will mostly be upset by the new arrangements are the very old, those without bank accounts, tax evaders and money launderers.

I could only really give a toss about the very old (unless they also happen to be tax evaders or money launderers).
Depends on what research you read and how much you trust it, but the UK is supposedly the third most cash free society in the world. Most state that ~85% of transactions are cash free.

So 15% of the economy are either so old or vulnerable that they can’t get a bank account or use a debit card or are using cash for criminal purposes.

My bet it that amongst the former, the old and very vulnerable, there is a tiny percentage who genuinely can’t get or use an account. Most could if they were given support and guidance. The government’s Financial Inclusion Report is pretty clear on how lack of access to banking and living off cash makes people more vulnerable. TBH it’s a pretty poor reflection on UK education and social services that there are supposedly 1.2M without a basic bank account of some sort. Whatever, their expenditure in cash is around less than 2% of the economy.

So in essence the very expensive infrastructure that is cash is being kept in place for less than 2% of the economy and being paid for by the 85% who no longer use or need it.
 
Banks are closing everywhere. Two areas I know are about to lose their last bank, when 20 years ago there was five. The escuse read today about HSBC closing ~80 branches is that there is a Post Office with one mile of them. No other banks.
 
Offices are going to get smaller as people have got so use to the WfH major cities are going to feel it, as I have said earlier, rent a space type office/meeting room will become more popular. Smaller head office locations and moving out of high rent areas. Towns and even villages that have a reasonable Broadband, good amenities (pub, shop, parking) will see an increase in take up of small office space to house these new head offices.

People will and are being more conscious where they spend their money, local tradespeople are now feeling the benefits and our local shop is busy all day. The house prices here have also gone up in a short space of time as people bug out of Londonium to a more rural area.

The new business world is one of increased flexibility, both working hours and locations. Smaller overheads in rent and business rates as you don't need massive offices anymore. Big cities are really going to feel it over the next 2-5 years.
 
Well it would do if people slowed down mind....

Have you ever driven at 50mph on a motorway, knowing it's only because of EU rules that you're being made to drive like a octogenarian
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
Offices are going to get smaller as people have got so use to the WfH major cities are going to feel it, as I have said earlier, rent a space type office/meeting room will become more popular. Smaller head office locations and moving out of high rent areas. Towns and even villages that have a reasonable Broadband, good amenities (pub, shop, parking) will see an increase in take up of small office space to house these new head offices.

People will and are being more conscious where they spend their money, local tradespeople are now feeling the benefits and our local shop is busy all day. The house prices here have also gone up in a short space of time as people bug out of Londonium to a more rural area.

The new business world is one of increased flexibility, both working hours and locations. Smaller overheads in rent and business rates as you don't need massive offices anymore. Big cities are really going to feel it over the next 2-5 years.
SWMBO works up near Sutton and has a boss who used to commute down from Leeds. Said boss has stated in recent months that the only time they'll really be getting the team together in one place in the future is for big meetings. The rest of the time people can thin out and WfH.

This is going to severely affect my viewing habits on a long-term basis.
 
SWMBO works up near Sutton and has a boss who used to commute down from Leeds. Said boss has stated in recent months that the only time they'll really be getting the team together in one place in the future is for big meetings. The rest of the time people can thin out and WfH.

This is going to severely affect my viewing habits on a long-term basis.
Can you get a rebate on XHamster premium?
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
Have you ever driven at 50mph on a motorway, knowing it's only because of EU rules that you're being made to drive like a octogenarian
Remember that the current speed limits were set when cars were dynamically a lot less capable than they are now (says the man who's currently editing the product literature for a leading speed enforcement camera developer...).

I'm all for average speed systems. They've a proven ability to smooth traffic flows and, even though you're driving more slowly, you often get there more quickly.*

That said, I'd issues spot fines of £1,000 or more to lane squatters. They are far more dangerous because of the congestion and frustration that they cause. The technology is there to do it and the public support, too.



*I'd also support an increase in the speed limits. It's not absolute speed that kills. It's inappropriate speed. camera systems can differentiate, and prosecute for, dangerous manoeuvres and tailgating (as noted, I'm writing about them professionally at this very moment).

A problem is the 'safety' lobby... as an industry commentator once commented to me, "Having a relative killed in a road incident is a tragedy but it does not make you an instant expert on road safety. Unfortunately, there's a vociferous element which takes the moral high ground."
 

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