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Demise of the city centre

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
The question is why would he save Arcadia? It’s a moribund business that has been in decline for decades. The brands are hardly aspirational; who wants to shop at Burton or Dorothy Perkins? Chucking money at Arcadia would only delay the inevitable, an inevitable that was going to happen without Covid.
I guess it depends whether the goal is personal wealth accrual or being a successful businessman.
 
The man is a turd. I know you're not suggesting it, because it won't happen, but do you think for a moment that he'll give up any of his personal fortune to save anything of his 'empire'? He's made his money. He's off.
A sensible business man then. Would you invest in a loss making business that is likely to continue to lose money?
 

syrup

LE
Is this thread the nearest one we have to obe on the decline of the High Street and traditional retail? I finding it shocking to see so many empty and shut down shops in the High Steet of the local town - and now the Acadia group going tits up will mean more empty units.

Can the decline be stopped? How?


High street up here has been done for ages loads of empty shops closing to be replaced with trendy restaurants that lasted a few months pre Covid.
Jamie Oliver tried and died as did many others.

Over priced parking in the town centre and you can barely get out your car even when you do find a spot.
Half the roads are shut down and accessible only for bikes and taxis.

We've some nice out of town shopping centres, free parking in decent spaces and lots of them.
Plenty of shops and places to eat.

No point going into town it's the council that have killed it as much as the internet.
 
I find a certain irony, in the demise of the corner shop/local grocer/butcher/candlestick maker et al. This was brought about, in the fullness of time, by department stores branching out too. Then the supermarkets appeared, putting pressure on the big stores. Now the supermarkets, in some cases, are feeling the heat from the internet. An awful lot of arrses have been bitten on this merry - go - round.
I hope SWMBO isn't knackered after all the running about for pressies.
Not as knackered as the bank balance is likely to be - I can't bring myself to check!
 
But do we really want nothing but charity shops, fast food outlets, international coffee chain franchises, and the odd WH Smith or local newsagent? There is an unsettling look of decline and emptiness - for example seeing an empty shop with RES ASS above the boarded up door, nobody even removing the signage properly.
WH Smith largely relocated into airports and train stations......... coffee shops will be decimated by the collapse in revenues and the demise of the high street, plus home based working. Cinemas will take two years to recover as no one is making films. Theatres (other than the west end in London) don’t really pull many people into town centres.

My daughter left the global Marketing team for Jo Malone to work for Top Shop about 18 months ago. She was there 4 weeks before announcing this is a dying brand. She left Top Shop after 3 months.

The demise of the Arcadia group will leave a lot of boarded up windows on the high street, but it won’t just be Arcadia group that goes. Who is going to buy a suit again? I’m not, and I’m sure I’m fairly typical I’d say. Men’s outfitters will go. My mrs comment the other day was the same about wimmins business dress.

some big changes underway. Lots of cash to be made converting shops into housing, but who would want to live in a city centre with no amenities?????

no one has through through the full impact yet - it’s social as well as economic and inward investment is not going to attract new business into City Centres and we will see the return of urban decay which local authorities have been tackling with things like pedestrianisation of the high street.......
 
some big changes underway. Lots of cash to be made converting shops into housing, but who would want to live in a city centre with no amenities?????

Probably the same type of people who already live in places with no amenities.
 
Probably the same type of people who already live in places with no amenities.
As I said - big social impact.

I was just reading about the exodus from London - rural property prices going through the roof in the Eastern counties, including East Hertfordshire. Very little movement in Buckinghamshire for two reasons - it’s expensive and HS2 is destroying rural communities.

It’s young professionals moving out, leaving highly skilled immigrants in the City Centre - all the doctors and dentists that are coming across from France on boats across the channel for example. City Centres will increasingly look like immigrant ghettos and there is nothing can be done to stop the rot.
 

syrup

LE
I find a certain irony, in the demise of the corner shop/local grocer/butcher/candlestick maker et al. This was brought about, in the fullness of time, by department stores branching out too. Then the supermarkets appeared, putting pressure on the big stores. Now the supermarkets, in some cases, are feeling the heat from the internet. An awful lot of arrses have been bitten on this merry - go - round.
I hope SWMBO isn't knackered after all the running about for pressies.

During proper lockdown the local shops did a roaring trade.
Partly I'm sure due to the parking restrictions being lifted
The bakers, butchers and green grocers was open as was a couple of general stores
You could park and bob in and out each shop sticking your stuff in the car.

Now the parking restrictions are back on.
Nearest place to park Morrisons
If I'm parking in Morrison's why walk past it to get to small shops and lug all my bags back.
Get a trolly and shop in there
 
As I said - big social impact.

I was just reading about the exodus from London - rural property prices going through the roof in the Eastern counties, including East Hertfordshire. Very little movement in Buckinghamshire for two reasons - it’s expensive and HS2 is destroying rural communities.

It’s young professionals moving out, leaving highly skilled immigrants in the City Centre - all the doctors and dentists that are coming across from France on boats across the channel for example. City Centres will increasingly look like immigrant ghettos and there is nothing can be done to stop the rot.

What social impact? The high street has constantly changed over time. 150 years ago there were no shops selling electrical items because they weren't invented, 60 years ago there were few shops selling some electrical items, 20 years ago there were shops selling lots of electrical items, now, the internet is here.
Insert computer games, films, books etc with different time lines but ultimately finishing with the internet.

There will be shops that survive, craftmen who cater for those who can afford not to buy mass produce shit, those providing a an immediately service, (Food, drink, massage, key cutting), second hand stores for the paupers, etc.

Anything else, who cares? I don't know why people view highstreets through rose tinted glasses, they were/are expensive and waste of time for most shopping.

Refugees tend to trash whatever areas they are forced into.

Plenty of people live close to a highstreet with lots of closed shops already, its hardly going to make a difference to them if they were offered accommodation in a converted shop
 
What social impact? The high street has constantly changed over time. 150 years ago there were no shops selling electrical items because they weren't invented, 60 years ago there were few shops selling some electrical items, 20 years ago there were shops selling lots of electrical items, now, the internet is here.
Insert computer games, films, books etc with different time lines but ultimately finishing with the internet.

There will be shops that survive, craftmen who cater for those who can afford not to buy mass produce shit, those providing a an immediately service, (Food, drink, massage, key cutting), second hand stores for the paupers, etc.

Anything else, who cares? I don't know why people view highstreets through rose tinted glasses, they were/are expensive and waste of time for most shopping.

Refugees tend to trash whatever areas they are forced into.

Plenty of people live close to a highstreet with lots of closed shops already, its hardly going to make a difference to them if they were offered accommodation in a converted shop
Online shopping, which someone previously mentioned.

shops are big employers - 12,000 in Debenhams and 13,000 in Arcadia. Shops drive local economies. Hence my comment about accelerated urban decay.

I live in the sticks so dont really give one re city and town centres. Shit holes to be avoided
 
Online shopping, which someone previously mentioned.

shops are big employers - 12,000 in Debenhams and 13,000 in Arcadia. Shops drive local economies. Hence my comment about accelerated urban decay.

I live in the sticks so dont really give one re city and town centres. Shit holes to be avoided

Amazon are hiring, 25000 people from a population of 66 million is nothing,
 
Saved me typing it
I would argue up in Yorkshire there are as many people employed in warehousing as there is in shops.

There are also things like delivery drivers, 30 years ago home delivery was a very small market, now the supermarkets and Amazon employ thousands. Old jobs go, new jobs are created.
 

wheel

LE
WH Smith largely relocated into airports and train stations......... coffee shops will be decimated by the collapse in revenues and the demise of the high street, plus home based working. Cinemas will take two years to recover as no one is making films. Theatres (other than the west end in London) don’t really pull many people into town centres.

My daughter left the global Marketing team for Jo Malone to work for Top Shop about 18 months ago. She was there 4 weeks before announcing this is a dying brand. She left Top Shop after 3 months.

The demise of the Arcadia group will leave a lot of boarded up windows on the high street, but it won’t just be Arcadia group that goes. Who is going to buy a suit again? I’m not, and I’m sure I’m fairly typical I’d say. Men’s outfitters will go. My mrs comment the other day was the same about wimmins business dress.

some big changes underway. Lots of cash to be made converting shops into housing, but who would want to live in a city centre with no amenities?????

no one has through through the full impact yet - it’s social as well as economic and inward investment is not going to attract new business into City Centres and we will see the return of urban decay which local authorities have been tackling with things like pedestrianisation of the high street.......
Even before the Portas save the High st Bo##cks. There were a growing group of people saying that town and city centers should have footprint reduced and areas developed for residential use.
 
High street up here has been done for ages loads of empty shops closing to be replaced with trendy restaurants that lasted a few months pre Covid.
Jamie Oliver tried and died as did many others.

Over priced parking in the town centre and you can barely get out your car even when you do find a spot.
Half the roads are shut down and accessible only for bikes and taxis.

We've some nice out of town shopping centres, free parking in decent spaces and lots of them.
Plenty of shops and places to eat.

No point going into town it's the council that have killed it as much as the internet.
This is very true, Councils have done more to kill the high street as much as the internet. However landlords do not help, for example, most of the commercial property in Saffron Walden is owned by London interests and they keep jacking up rents, so shops just close as they can't make a any money along with the business rates and ridiculous parking restrictions and in some cases rip off parking charges, it no longer makes any sense. you can probably have better margins flogging on EBay and Etsy from your garage than from bricks and mortar.
 
This is very true, Councils have done more to kill the high street as much as the internet. However landlords do not help, for example, most of the commercial property in Saffron Walden is owned by London interests and they keep jacking up rents, so shops just close as they can't make a any money along with the business rates and ridiculous parking restrictions and in some cases rip off parking charges, it no longer makes any sense. you can probably have better margins flogging on EBay and Etsy from your garage than from bricks and mortar.

If you cant afford a fiver to park a couple of times a week, the chances are you cant afford to shop and pay highstreet prices.

Parking restrictions are generally because the great British public park up and **** off for hours on end if you let them.
 
I guess it depends whether the goal is personal wealth accrual or being a successful businessman.
That was kind of my point. Successful businessman read the tea leaves and get out while they can. If anything, that was a decade of more ago for Arcadia.

He could have wound down the retail side and built an e-commerce business. He could have embraced ethical fashion. He could have rebranded moribund names like Burton and Dorothy Perkins. He could have founded something new.

Instead he took a big early pay check when he bought already dead brands and sweated them way after they had any intrinsic value. An East End barrow boy done good.

It’s worth commenting that in the same period that Green sweated Arcadia, others have built global, aspirational brands. Meanwhile there are no British retail brands with an international presence.
 

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