Degree in Flying Car Engineering

#1
Yup, get that degree in "Flying Car Engineering! that will find you work as soon as you finish?
The MoD will snap you up and within a few years your be running the fleet.



For those looking for an unusual degree course, one in flying car engineering may just fit the bill.
The online course is being offered by Silicon Valley e-learning school Udacity and will begin in February.

It is the brainchild of former Stanford University professor Sebastian Thrun, who previously headed up Google's self-driving car project, Waymo. Prof Thrun is hoping to attract at least 10,000 applicants to what he is describing as a "nanodegree".

A nanodegree, according to Udacity's website, is an online certification that can be earned in six to 12 months, and aims to teach basic programming skills in various disciplines. Prof Thrun also runs Kitty Hawk, a start-up with a mission to make the dream of personal flight a reality. Google co-founder Larry Page is one of its investors.

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#2
And, believe it or not, I saw a presentation recently about self piloting passenger carrying airy-hoppers to avoid the traffic to and from Dallas - Fort Worth airport*. The pitch was to take passengers to and from Plano and Frisco in 12 minutes rather than 45 minutes. I just don't feel comfortable with the whole self driving, flying, sailing, dying thing. Having studied IT to post-grad level I have seen some of the kn0bs that will programme this stuff - when was the last time you never, ever, had a software glitch for no reason?

* 3 - 5 year implementation period.
 
#4
And, believe it or not, I saw a presentation recently about self piloting passenger carrying airy-hoppers to avoid the traffic to and from Dallas - Fort Worth airport*. The pitch was to take passengers to and from Plano and Frisco in 12 minutes rather than 45 minutes. I just don't feel comfortable with the whole self driving, flying, sailing, dying thing. Having studied IT to post-grad level I have seen some of the kn0bs that will programme this stuff - when was the last time you never, ever, had a software glitch for no reason?

* 3 - 5 year implementation period.
I haven't been to DFW in a while. Have they finished the I-435 double-decking thing yet? Traffic was horrendous last time I was there.
 
#5
I haven't been to DFW in a while. Have they finished the I-435 double-decking thing yet? Traffic was horrendous last time I was there.
I-35? Not noticed a 435 round here - 121, 114, 635. 635 is effectively the North Dallas circular, it's a firkin racetrack. It has HOV lanes that you pay an auto toll to use with a widget fitted in the car, there is a really nice bit that drops down from the main carriageway for about 8 miles, all nicely discrete with no plod I've heard you can get up to <cough>110mph down there.

Generally because of the rapid growth of Dallas there are roads works on many of the major roads, and huge building sites everywhere. Apart from central Dallas - the mayor steadfastly refuses to rebuild the roads in central Dallas.
 
#6
Oops, yes, 635. Last time I was there, they were double-decking it.
 

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