Deferred at medical until Army figures out how to test for Sickle Cell

Status
Not open for further replies.

alt6

Crow
Hi all,

I went up to Westbury for my medical on the 7th of Jan however after passing all the standard elements I was informed that due to my ethnicity not being White British my medical was being deferred. I was told the army was taking extra precautions in response to an incident involving 2 international cadets dying before Christmas. (google BBC Army sickle cell)

So I was told to sit tight and wait for the army to contact me with how they wanted to proceed with sickle cell screening on us non British ethnicity candidates and I was wondering if anyone in the same boat as me has received further instructions as my CSM is not responding to my whatsapp messages.

Thanks.
 
I am concerned that there is a group of non-UK candidates who are at risk of death or harm if further steps are not taken immediately," Ms Hunt added.

The coroner gave the MoD until January 31 to respond.

Purely speculation on my part. This has many legs and a long way to run before it is brought to a conclusion.

You may have a long wait.
 

diverman

LE
Book Reviewer
Sounds like,a,cock up. Many years ago a friend of Baijan decent applied for the RAF, medical, they took blood and screened for sickle cell, if he had it he wasn’t getting in.
 
It's not the test per se, it's the implications of allowing those with possible sickle cell traits to serve. There is likely a genuine medical impact, but it is also racially discriminatory to simply screen out any sickle cell carriers without a really rigorous and sustainable understanding of the risk that is being carrier.

As Portree Kid, this ain't going to be quick.
 

diverman

LE
Book Reviewer
It's not the test per se, it's the implications of allowing those with possible sickle cell traits to serve. There is likely a genuine medical impact, but it is also racially discriminatory to simply screen out any sickle cell carriers without a really rigorous and sustainable understanding of the risk that is being carrier.

As Portree Kid, this ain't going to be quick.
If you can’t bind oxygen to haemoglobin then that’s a problem which will kill you.
 
It's not the test per se, it's the implications of allowing those with possible sickle cell traits to serve. There is likely a genuine medical impact, but it is also racially discriminatory to simply screen out any sickle cell carriers without a really rigorous and sustainable understanding of the risk that is being carrier.

As Portree Kid, this ain't going to be quick.
That being the case, if someone has tested negative, then there is no additional risk, in which case, if the OP were to get himself tested and achieve a negative result, that would sidestep the problem. From the NHS website:-
"If you think you could be a carrier, ask for a test from your GP surgery or nearest sickle cell and thalassaemia centre.

Both men and women can have the test."
 
That being the case, if someone has tested negative, then there is no additional risk, in which case, if the OP were to get himself tested and achieve a negative result, that would sidestep the problem.
The problem with Sickle Cell is that you might not have Sickle Cell Disease but may well have Sickle Cell Traits.

I suspect that it is the actual traits that are causing the problems, as having the disease would probably be an outright medical fail.
 

alt6

Crow
That being the case, if someone has tested negative, then there is no additional risk, in which case, if the OP were to get himself tested and achieve a negative result, that would sidestep the problem.
I offered to get myself tested externally and submit the results but the medical team were adamant that the only way forward was to wait for the Army's decision.

Really frustrating considering the long waits for briefing dates but hopefully it can be resolved soon!
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Latest Threads

Top