DEFENCE EXPENDITURE - Spring Statement 23MAR2022

I wouldn’t normally use The MIRROR, as a source, but it was the first to appear after The TELEGRAPH, which wouldn’t allow me to disable cookies.

Published by: Dan Bloom Online Political Editor, The MIRROR, on 22 March 2022

Spring Statement 2022 and what will Rishi Sunak announce
Chancellor Rishi Sunak will announce his ‘mini-Budget’ 2022 Spring Statement tomorrow as inflation could surge beyond 8%, fuel duty could be cut or National Insurance tinkered with - but critics warn his help for the cost-of-living crisis won't be enough . . .
All Spring Statement predictions tomorrow - from fuel duty to National Insurance



Somewhere in (the full version of) the foreshortened version of the Sophie Ridge interview, embedded within the link to The MIRROR, Chancellor Rishi Sunak rules out any increase in Defence spending, claiming that all eventualities were included in the 16 March 2021 “Integrated Review” - which identified Russia as a significant threat.

It should now be clearly obvious, that . . .

1. whatever threats to our security were identified and anticipated within the “Integrated Review”,

and,

2. however the MoD is (still) in the process of re-structuring our armed forces, to counter such anticipated threats,

neither have been sufficient to Deter - let alone Defend - against Putin’s irrational, unprovoked attack against Ukraine.
Global Britain in a Competitive Age: the Integrated Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy


Clearly Liz Truss has been reading my own suggestions for increased spending, and shares the same destain as myself for the “excuses” posted by others on ARRSE, that the electorate is pre-occupied with the cost-of-living, fuel prices, the NHS, NI contributions, inflation.

Whilst all valid items for discussion, all are subsidiary to the existential question of our national security, our very existence – as now being experienced by Ukraine – and, the equivalent of re-arranging the deckchairs, whilst the ship goes down!


Published by: Emma Crabtree, The EXPRESS, on Monday 28 February 2022.
Ukraine invasion: Liz Truss urges NATO to boost defence spending - ‘Doing all we can’
LIZ TRUSS has been vocal about the Government's need to increase defence spending and has been critical of the focus on modern warfare at the expense of traditional weaponry.
On Sunday, Liz Truss said that Britain must increase its defence spending and be cautious about focusing too much on cyberattacks over conventional weaponry . . .
“So, no wonder that our countries don’t see us having the same strength that we used to have, and maybe we should be spending more on our Armed forces and less on things like Brexit.”
The Foreign Secretary blamed Europe for being far too complacent about the threat posed by Vladimir Putin over the years.
Ukraine invasion: Liz Truss urges NATO to boost defence spending - ‘Doing all we can’



Hopefully Liz Truss (and others), have been as vocal around the Cabinet Table, as she has in front of the media.
 
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For all his supposed expertise and big brain, if Sunak diggs his heels in on defence and doesn’t appear to take the cost of living crisis seriously, then it appears that his political (both small and large P) acumen is seriously lacking…
 
neither have been sufficient to Deter - let alone Defend - against Putin’s irrational, unprovoked attack against Ukraine.
It is somewhat difficult to deter someone from a course of action, when there is no defensive treaty in place to support it - and no mechanism to achieve UN authorisation of action. Let alone when the leaders of the western world make it clear that Article V cannot apply and that militarily UKR is on its own. No amount of military spending would make a difference in this case.

The deterrence in this case was the threat of sanctions, which appears not to have been deemed a credible threat by Big Gay Vlad. I doubt he will make that miscalculation again. Trouble is that he's now stuck in a quagmire of his own making. No way to win without significant escalation and even that may not be enough - and no way out without huge loss of face. The longer it goes on, the worse it gets for him.

For the avoidance of doubt, it would be a good idea to increase UK defence spending still further. However, the biggest dangers to the UK right now are inflation, energy security and balance of payments (ie the deficit). The fact that the Boxheads appear to have realised the error of their ways, goes a long way to repairing - in the medium term - the deterrent capability of NATO. Given those facts, Sunak can be forgiven his approach.
 
SKY press preview, just reported (Tuesday 2240hrs), that the Treasury has an unexpected £20Bn in its reserves !!
 
SKY press preview, just reported (Tuesday 2240hrs), that the Treasury has an unexpected £20Bn in its reserves !!
I read £50b to play with the other other day in an article to do with help for the cost of living.
Borrowed far less than thought plus tax receipts up £20b
Interest on debt is up £8b compared to last year though.
 
I wouldn’t normally use The MIRROR, as a source, but it was the first to appear after The TELEGRAPH, which wouldn’t allow me to disable cookies.

Published by: Dan Bloom Online Political Editor, The MIRROR, on 22 March 2022

Spring Statement 2022 and what will Rishi Sunak announce
Chancellor Rishi Sunak will announce his ‘mini-Budget’ 2022 Spring Statement tomorrow as inflation could surge beyond 8%, fuel duty could be cut or National Insurance tinkered with - but critics warn his help for the cost-of-living crisis won't be enough . . .
All Spring Statement predictions tomorrow - from fuel duty to National Insurance



Somewhere in (the full version of) the foreshortened version of the Sophie Ridge interview, embedded within the link to The MIRROR, Chancellor Rishi Sunak rules out any increase in Defence spending, claiming that all eventualities were included in the 16 March 2021 “Integrated Review” - which identified Russia as a significant threat.

It should now be clearly obvious, that . . .

1. whatever threats to our security were identified and anticipated within the “Integrated Review”,

and,

2. however the MoD is (still) in the process of re-structuring our armed forces, to counter such anticipated threats,

neither have been sufficient to Deter - let alone Defend - against Putin’s irrational, unprovoked attack against Ukraine.
Global Britain in a Competitive Age: the Integrated Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy


Clearly Liz Truss has been reading my own suggestions for increased spending, and shares the same destain as myself for the “excuses” posted by others on ARRSE, that the electorate is pre-occupied with the cost-of-living, fuel prices, the NHS, NI contributions, inflation.

Whilst all valid items for discussion, all are subsidiary to the existential question of our national security, our very existence – as now being experienced by Ukraine – and, the equivalent of re-arranging the deckchairs, whilst the ship goes down!


Published by: Emma Crabtree, The EXPRESS, on Monday 28 February 2022.
Ukraine invasion: Liz Truss urges NATO to boost defence spending - ‘Doing all we can’
LIZ TRUSS has been vocal about the Government's need to increase defence spending and has been critical of the focus on modern warfare at the expense of traditional weaponry.
On Sunday, Liz Truss said that Britain must increase its defence spending and be cautious about focusing too much on cyberattacks over conventional weaponry . . .
“So, no wonder that our countries don’t see us having the same strength that we used to have, and maybe we should be spending more on our Armed forces and less on things like Brexit.”
The Foreign Secretary blamed Europe for being far too complacent about the threat posed by Vladimir Putin over the years.
Ukraine invasion: Liz Truss urges NATO to boost defence spending - ‘Doing all we can’



Hopefully Liz Truss (and others), have been as vocal around the Cabinet Table, as she has in front of the media.
I don't recall UK having any defence treaty with Ukraine, and going by current performance the Russian Army is no threat to Britain.
If you're concerned about Russian strategic nukes, perhaps investment in UK civil defence might be more appropriate than increasing the UK army?
 
Whilst all valid items for discussion, all are subsidiary to the existential question of our national security, our very existence – as now being experienced by Ukraine – and, the equivalent of re-arranging the deckchairs, whilst the ship goes down!


Published by: Emma Crabtree, The EXPRESS, on Monday 28 February 2022.
Ukraine invasion: Liz Truss urges NATO to boost defence spending - ‘Doing all we can’
LIZ TRUSS has been vocal about the Government's need to increase defence spending and has been critical of the focus on modern warfare at the expense of traditional weaponry.
On Sunday, Liz Truss said that Britain must increase its defence spending and be cautious about focusing too much on cyberattacks over conventional weaponry . . .
“So, no wonder that our countries don’t see us having the same strength that we used to have, and maybe we should be spending more on our Armed forces and less on things like Brexit.”
The Foreign Secretary blamed Europe for being far too complacent about the threat posed by Vladimir Putin over the years.
Ukraine invasion: Liz Truss urges NATO to boost defence spending - ‘Doing all we can’



Hopefully Liz Truss (and others), have been as vocal around the Cabinet Table, as she has in front of the media.
Demonstrating that Liz Truss doesn't have even a basic understanding of what NATO is and how NATO works.

I'm all for increased defence expenditure but if the 'mini-budget' increases defence expenditure, it will take time to set up new procurement programmes and even longer to begin to deliver; extant programmes could be accelerated but very little defence equipment is COTS; the OSD of some platforms and capabilities could be extended, projected workforce reductions could be reversed (not quite as easy as it sounds because of DLODs impacts) but there is unlikely to be a substantial change in Britain's ORBAT for some time. Weapons holdings and '90 day stocks' could be increased (but will take time) and the RAF might wish to look at wider dispersal of high value assets assets, and general (re)hardening of airfields.. Now might be a good time to push for wider Reserves recruitment and retention.

More equipment could be purchased from the US (but the FMS system is sclerotically slow), but we will be joining a queue of many other nations wanting to increase their firepower. The UKUS Defence Trade Agreement might speed things up, but solely for joint UK/US programmes,
 
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Daxx

MIA
Book Reviewer
Im amused by a number of whiney posts I have seen on various platforms about HDT claims and MMA not keeping up with current fuel prices. Given only military personnel get HDT and CS staff also get paid at a much lower rate, my heart bleeds for them :)

Maslo hierarchy of needs, forgetting that it is likely there will be no significant increase in defence spending, and if there is, it isn't going to be boosting allowances.
 
Im amused by a number of whiney posts I have seen on various platforms about HDT claims and MMA not keeping up with current fuel prices. Given only military personnel get HDT and CS staff also get paid at a much lower rate, my heart bleeds for them :)

Maslo hierarchy of needs, forgetting that it is likely there will be no significant increase in defence spending, and if there is, it isn't going to be boosting allowances.
I Idly considered that when I went for a cardiac appointment on Monday (90 minute drive each way). In my not-so-distant uniformed days I could have got a car and driver to take me there and back, or gone by train and taxi - all at the public expense. At least the CS doesn't double-guess your appointments - as I found working in industry where we were billed out in 15 minute slices.
 
I wonder if we'll ever see the VAT reduction in fuel at the forecourt? If it's anything like those rare occasions when duty has been reduced by a paltry penny a pint or whatever, the breweries/pubcos/landlords say, "Nah, we'll have that, thank you very much".
 
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