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Deerstalking as a hobby, the why's and wherefores of training and certification

windswept398

Old-Salt
Needn't be , first do your DSC1 , then offer to help local keepers , be it as a beater or doing the odd bit of weekend work in return for some stalking/culling , if you go beating you will network with the right crowd ., if you can get in with local farmers you`ll get your stalking for free , I can go when I want and dont have to pay a penny , if fact many farmers ask me to cull deer as they eat so much grass thats meant for cattle ,I dont have time to do it all.

Outstanding response. Cheers.
Next question, to do a DSC1, I'd need a firearms license? And so many hours on the range?
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
No, you can take it with no training at all
Although I recommend a bought stalk first, get yourself blooded and see if it suits you before you pay any serious dosh over
 

Bluenose2

Old-Salt
Very interesting thread @ugly

I'm a lucky boy - one of my old STAB oppos is a Deer Ranger up in Grizedale. I get to tag along occasionally and watch him work. I have no real desire to pull the trigger, just love the experience. Watching the sun come up over the fells, bimbling around in his truck and talking about old times - quite a distance removed from my usual contract jobs sat in some grubby client office on an industrial estate in the East Mids.

But when he expects me to help him drag a big F.O Red back to his van, and i'm blowing out my @rse after a few minutes, that grubby office suddenly looks a bit more attractive.

Roll on November and my next visit up there. Going to take my new dog up and see if he's got any talent for the job.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
I once was called some colour of weird for suggesting on a north American hunting forum that scouting your ground weeks before the season opened and spending time in a seat or hide with binos was often more productive than with a rifle.
Admittedly they lack our generous seasons but I still spend longer watching wildlife through binos or eyeball mk1 than through a rifle scope.
 

itchy300

Old-Salt
I once was called some colour of weird for suggesting on a north American hunting forum that scouting your ground weeks before the season opened and spending time in a seat or hide with binos was often more productive than with a rifle.
Admittedly they lack our generous seasons but I still spend longer watching wildlife through binos or eyeball mk1 than through a rifle scope.

It's the only way to have productive outings. Time in recce and all that
 
D

Deleted 24582

Guest
I once was called some colour of weird for suggesting on a north American hunting forum that scouting your ground weeks before the season opened and spending time in a seat or hide with binos was often more productive than with a rifle.
Admittedly they lack our generous seasons but I still spend longer watching wildlife through binos or eyeball mk1 than through a rifle scope.

Scouting trips are great.

But we have different sorts of hunter's though. Some are the weekend warrior types, who make no preparation what so ever. Other's are fanatics that spend more time preparing for the hunt then actually stalking.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
For us the hunt is all year round, it may be a call to assist with a deer RTC or even a call from a farmer who is plagued by deer or foxes. Sometimes its just the daily rounds in the truck or quad with a rifle just in case.
 

itchy300

Old-Salt
For us the hunt is all year round, it may be a call to assist with a deer RTC or even a call from a farmer who is plagued by deer or foxes. Sometimes its just the daily rounds in the truck or quad with a rifle just in case.

Ref. Assisting with deer involved in RTCs, is it worth getting involved? My local plod have a scheme but it seems like a lot of liability for I'm not sure what benefit?
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Ref. Assisting with deer involved in RTCs, is it worth getting involved? My local plod have a scheme but it seems like a lot of liability for I'm not sure what benefit?
Depends if you need a humane despatch pistol, its a good reason if you are on the scheme.
 
Although I recommend a bought stalk first, get yourself blooded and see if it suits you before you pay any serious dosh over

Best advice to new would be stalkers. One of my mates who was very outdoorsy and into fishing/bushcraft and associated crap asked me to take him out stalking which I did.

He liked shooting the rifle at the target and successfully got a deer but the reality was it really wasn’t for him - cost him nothing but could have been an expensive lesson.
 
Depends if you need a humane despatch pistol, its a good reason if you are on the scheme.

I’m on the fence with the whole requirement for a pistol for humane dispatch, I’m not saying there Is never a case that an individual would need one but there does seem to be an attitude that some will say the right things to try and get one to the point it’s almost to be victorious over plod for getting one.

I wonder if there is data showing how many stalkers used pistols for dispatch prior to the ban. My german friend who does a lot of tracking has a pistol for dispatch but says he never uses it and opts for the rifle/shotgun or knife depending on the circumstances.

I’ve dispatched a reasonable number of deer over the years and my opinion is if you can get close enough to use a pistol your close enough to go for the atlas joint with a knife or failing that shoot it again with a rifle or moderated .410 if it’s close but too mobile.

Others may disagree but unless it’s personal experience of using pistols for dispatch and the circumstances I always find it largely irrelevant going down the line of “what if, but”.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
I’m on the fence with the whole requirement for a pistol for humane dispatch, I’m not saying there Is never a case that an individual would need one but there does seem to be an attitude that some will say the right things to try and get one to the point it’s almost to be victorious over plod for getting one.

I wonder if there is data showing how many stalkers used pistols for dispatch prior to the ban. My german friend who does a lot of tracking has a pistol for dispatch but says he never uses it and opts for the rifle/shotgun or knife depending on the circumstances.

I’ve dispatched a reasonable number of deer over the years and my opinion is if you can get close enough to use a pistol your close enough to go for the atlas joint with a knife or failing that shoot it again with a rifle or moderated .410 if it’s close but too mobile.

Others may disagree but unless it’s personal experience of using pistols for dispatch and the circumstances I always find it largely irrelevant going down the line of “what if, but”.
Indeed, just another tool in the box, I dont use many torque wrenches if any at all. Doesn't mean I shouldn't keep one handy.
 
Indeed, just another tool in the box, I dont use many torque wrenches if any at all. Doesn't mean I shouldn't keep one handy.

Quite correct but it seems to be the challenge of getting one authorised to say they have it rather than the likelihood of it being used that appeals to some (not all).
 
Ref. Assisting with deer involved in RTCs, is it worth getting involved? My local plod have a scheme but it seems like a lot of liability for I'm not sure what benefit?
I did do a Humane Dispatch course , but my local force prefer to do it (fcuk it up ) themselves , humane dispatch and Police marksman do not happen together.
 
Pistols/Revolvers have their place in humane dispatch but more frequently with fallen farm animals , often cattle / horses are in a shed and thrashing around when they need that shot , a hand gun with a low velocity bullet is a good way to dispatch them , with deer in the field if one has a badly placed bullet in its gut you really dont want to be walking up to it and loosing off a 308w into its head , I know of one case where a stalker did this and the round went through the deer , ricocheted off a rock and through his mates leg .
 
Pistols/Revolvers have their place in humane dispatch but more frequently with fallen farm animals , often cattle / horses are in a shed and thrashing around when they need that shot , a hand gun with a low velocity bullet is a good way to dispatch them , with deer in the field if one has a badly placed bullet in its gut you really dont want to be walking up to it and loosing off a 308w into its head , I know of one case where a stalker did this and the round went through the deer , ricocheted off a rock and through his mates leg .

With you for reasons surrounding livestock but for stalking I remain unconvinced.

Where did the ricochet incident happen?
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Quite correct but it seems to be the challenge of getting one authorised to say they have it rather than the likelihood of it being used that appeals to some (not all).
Agreed and some of those I know who have them are definitely the sort of person who I would question having an FAC were I their FEO!
Sometimes its fun having something no one lese can have, section 7 for one lost its appeal for me rather rapidly.
I do have despatch pistols but getting them changed as I now no longer use them and need something different is an utter ballsache. If I surrender the .410 to get my .17 I know they will remove the slot as no longer needed even if I cant recall using the .410 in anger and have had to use a full size .17 regularly when I needed a despatch pistol in that calibre.
Maybe when I get the chance to meet the new boss it will change.
I'm not holding my breath!
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
With you for reasons surrounding livestock but for stalking I remain unconvinced.

Where did the ricochet incident happen?
Luckily enough forces consider it legitimate and it adds to those they can call out rather than have the fuzz in the dock for injuring their own!
 

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