Dedicated Russian thread

(...) Word 'invasive' is common one in English but respective word ИНВАЗИВНЫЙ is used only as a special medical term and most of native Russian speakers hardly would understand what does it mean. (...)
The word "invasive" is a specialised medical term in English too, and not one that the average native English speaker would use in everyday conversation when describing the state of his health.

If you asked the average native English speaker what the word "invasive" meant he is likely to assume he is being asked what the Russians are getting up to again.
 
The word "invasive" is a specialised medical term in English too, and not one that the average native English speaker would use in everyday conversation when describing the state of his health.

If you asked the average native English speaker what the word "invasive" meant he is likely to assume he is being asked what the Russians are getting up to again.
Well the Poles have always regarded the Muscovites as an invasive species ........... hat, coat, TAXI !! :-D
 
The word "invasive" is a specialised medical term in English too, and not one that the average native English speaker would use in everyday conversation when describing the state of his health.

If you asked the average native English speaker what the word "invasive" meant he is likely to assume he is being asked what the Russians are getting up to again.
Search of word 'invasive' on BBC site gives many results.
Dozens of migrant women have alleged that they faced unnecessarily invasive gynaecological procedures without proper consent whilst being held at a US immigration detention centre.
Michael Mosley and Mehreen Baig investigate non-invasive facial procedures - and how they can go wrong.
NHS blunder sees wrong woman given invasive procedure
If invasive beauty procedures are not carried out properly, it can put the patient at risk of serious complications.
It looks that 'invasive' as a medical term is widely being used in mass media and English speakers (most of them) understand its meaning. By contrast respective Russian word ИНВАЗИВНЫЙ is used only by professionals. It can be found in special literature and is not being used by mass media.

 
Search of word 'invasive' on BBC site gives many results.




It looks that 'invasive' as a medical term is widely being used in mass media and English speakers (most of them) understand its meaning. By contrast respective Russian word ИНВАЗИВНЫЙ is used only by professionals. It can be found in special literature and is not being used by mass media.

It is the correct, specific, medical phrase as used in your examples. Whether the general public understand what it specifically means, I wouldn't like to guess.

Maybe the average UK resident is better educated than the average Russian one.
 
It is the correct, specific, medical phrase as used in your examples. Whether the general public understand what it specifically means, I wouldn't like to guess.

Maybe the average UK resident is better educated than the average Russian one.
Even many educated Russians would not understand what word 'ИНВАЗИВНЫЙ' does mean because it is not used in mass media or elsewhere except special literature. In respective context other words would be used as 'ПРОНИКАЮЩИЙ' = penetrative, for example.
There are also 20 patients in critical care or on invasive ventilation.
I suppose that general public would understand the meaning of word 'invasive' here.
Scotland has become the first country in the world to implement a new, non-invasive test for oesophageal cancer.
Qatar has said it will investigate allegations that women booked on 10 flights were subjected to invasive examinations at an airport in Doha.
Anyway word 'invasive' is widely being used in mass media.
 
the poles are OK in my books. got great head of a polish nurse. no f3cking around trousers open in a car park sucked me dry.

Did you return the favour to him?
 

Slime

LE
Search of word 'invasive' on BBC site gives many results.




It looks that 'invasive' as a medical term is widely being used in mass media and English speakers (most of them) understand its meaning. By contrast respective Russian word ИНВАЗИВНЫЙ is used only by professionals. It can be found in special literature and is not being used by mass media.


Well done you :)
A whole three examples………pretty good for a population of over 60,000,000 who talk to each other or use social media every day.

It’s not in common use.
Native English speakers have pointed it out to you, as am I, living in the U.K.

You, on the other hand, living in Russia, and with often very poor use of English aren’t in a position to be saying what’s in common use or not.
 
Well done you :)
A whole three examples………pretty good for a population of over 60,000,000 who talk to each other or use social media every day.

It’s not in common use.
Native English speakers have pointed it out to you, as am I, living in the U.K.

You, on the other hand, living in Russia, and with often very poor use of English aren’t in a position to be saying what’s in common use or not.
Of course my English is very poor and it is almost voided idiomatic expressions as I'm not native English speaker.
Thank you very much for support. In fact you confirmed my point. As I understand you agree that the phrase
I don’t want to describe the details but the clinical treatment was invasive, painful and depressing.
was written by well educated native English speaker, who inserted rarely used word 'invasive'. So translation (apparently made by Yulia Skripal) contains extremely rarely used special medial term in Russian variant.
I hold your opinion in high esteem as you tend to agree that the English variant of the written statement was made in English and not by Yulia.
 
was written by well educated native English speaker, who inserted rarely used word 'invasive'. So translation (apparently made by Yulia Skripal) contains extremely rarely used special medial term in Russian variant.
Here’s a thought. A medical term rarely used in conversational English, used by a woman with a hole in her neck who has just had the rare circumstance of being poisoned with a nerve agent, having had an invasive operation and spending her time in hospital with lots of specialist medical support.

I hazard a guess that she will have become very familiar with the term
 

Slime

LE
Of course my English is very poor and it is almost voided idiomatic expressions as I'm not native English speaker.
Thank you very much for support. In fact you confirmed my point. As I understand you agree that the phrase

was written by well educated native English speaker, who inserted rarely used word 'invasive'. So translation (apparently made by Yulia Skripal) contains extremely rarely used special medial term in Russian variant.
I hold your opinion in high esteem as you tend to agree that the English variant of the written statement was made in English and not by Yulia.

Pretty poor effort again on your part.
No, I don’t agree with you, but you already knew that.

The comical thing is that IF your assertion was correct you wouldn’t need to try to twist my words, or to have to work hard to find the word invasive in the quotes you mentioned.

Julia used the word correctly to describe one very soecific thing that had happened to her. Consider it a bit like when people use the word antiestablishmentarianism ……

Its the correct word for a specific thing, but just isn’t used often.

The even more comical thing is that your avatar (with its variable written English) still finds the need to try to discredit Julia, but despite your country’s attempt to murder her and her father she is doing well, and her spoken English is now better than ever :)
 

Slime

LE
Here’s a thought. A medical term rarely used in conversational English, used by a woman with a hole in her neck who has just had the rare circumstance of being poisoned with a nerve agent, having had an invasive operation and spending her time in hospital with lots of specialist medical support.

I hazard a guess that she will have become very familiar with the term

Perhaps the KGB avatar needs or wants to start a new thread on words or phrases that are very rarely if ever used!!!

For a very rarely used phrase he could start a thread titled:
We will show the world the photos we took of Salisbury.

For a thread on a phrase NEVER used he could start one titled:
These are the photos we promised to show of our trip to Salisbury.
 
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Our house troll is succedding to obfuscate the major issues here with quibbling about irrelevancies.

As usual.
 
BB63AE3F-8894-41D8-98E1-709EF9872236.png

Missing persons.
We are very concerned regarding the health of two Russian tourists who have not been seen for three years.
UK police originally would have liked to speak to them to reunite them with their property that had been lost and found, however are now very concerned for their health, particularly that they may be at risk from violent individuals
 

Slime

LE
View attachment 591535
Missing persons.
We are very concerned regarding the health of two Russian tourists who have not been seen for three years.
UK police originally would have liked to speak to them to reunite them with their property that had been lost and found, however are now very concerned for their health, particularly that they may be at risk from violent individuals

Wow, that snow in that photo must be 2 metres deep!!!!!

Let’s hope all the local rats were tucked up safe and warm in their dungeons.
 

Slime

LE
More bully-boy threats and domestic willy-waving from Moscow:

Let’s hope no points out to Putin that the ships he would use for his strikes are:
Often unreliable.
Often smoky
Often noisy in an acoustic sense,
and, very slow moving easy to find and destroy targets :)

Ship on the sea bed = no strike capability :)
 

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