Army Rumour Service

Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Dedicated Russian thread

Worth a view, by Navalny English subs...

Well, unfortunately, what's the betting Navalny will have a fatal accident or illness while currently in custody?
 
Worth a view, by Navalny English subs...

76 mln. views to this day (24 January). Putin along with his gang of crooks and thieves didn't expect so big number.
Protest march in Sankt-Peterburg, in the very center of the city - The Nevsky prospect.

1611470092073.png


Moscow, the Pushkin square, very close to Kremlin

1611470295623.png


Moscow

1611470485737.png


Here is a video of protests in different Russian cities.


1611474226727.png


1611474127685.png
 
Last edited:
Update on numbers detained yesterday: restocking the gulags.

'Thousands of Russians were detained across the country amid protests calling for the release of opposition leader Aleksei Navalny, with riot police cracking down violently on what were Russia's biggest anti-government demonstrations in years.

'It was unclear what effect the January 23 protests, which stretched across Russia’s 11 time zones amid subfreezing temperatures, would have on the government of President Vladimir Putin, who remains popular and largely without any political rival.

'But the turnout of tens of thousands of people from Moscow to Vladivostok, who answered Navalny's call to demonstrate after his jailing following his return a week ago from Germany, showed the attraction of Navalny’s crusade against corruption.

'As of January 24, nearly 3,300 people were reported detained across the country, according to the independent monitoring group OVD-Info. Nearly half of those detentions occurred in Moscow and included Navalny’s wife, Yuliya, and one of his top allies, Lyubov Sobol, who was forcibly grabbed by police as she spoke to reporters.

'The demonstrations spanned the breadth of the country, beginning in the Far East and Siberia in Khabarovsk, Vladivostok, Novosibirsk, and other cities despite brutal cold and a heavy security presence.

'There were various tallies about the nationwide turnout. MBKh Media -- an online news organization founded by the exiled Russian businessman Mikhail Khodorkovsky – put the number at 110,000, though other estimates said the number was likely much higher.

'Moscow city officials said the crowds that initially packed the city's central Pushkin Square numbered around 4,000. Reuters and other news organizations estimated that some 40,000 had turned up.'


 
The Kremlin is reverting to the old trope of “foreign interference”. It’s not going down very well with much of the public.

The demonstrations across Russia show that Moscow’s fears about the examples set by Ukraine several years ago and Belarus recently, can and will be replicated in Russia.

The repressive “Muscovite Mindset” is still in the ascendant but repression is no longer as easy to enforce when information cannot be fully controlled by the Kremlin.
 
Putin has denied that the opulent palace and surrounding mini-statelet at the centre of Navalny’s most recent corruption accusations in the film clip linked to by @Graculus above, does not belong to him. (Despite the overwhelming evidence).

This is the difference. In the past, the Tsars could just say: “So what?” This is my God-given right.” The current neo-Tsar is forced to deny it, despite his position at the apex of the “Muscovite Mindset”.

The old order is finally beginning to crumble.
 
Putin has denied that the opulent palace and surrounding mini-statelet at the centre of Navalny’s most recent corruption accusations in the film clip linked to by @Graculus above, does not belong to him. (Despite the overwhelming evidence).

This is the difference. In the past, the Tsars could just say: “So what?” This is my God-given right.” The current neo-Tsar is forced to deny it, despite his position at the apex of the “Muscovite Mindset”.

The old order is finally beginning to crumble.
I have an impression that Russian thieving ruling elite is disappointed and surprised by the protests. They were not so numerous as one could expect but geography of the protests is impressive - in fact protest actions took place in most of big cities across Russia. Previously only Moscow and Sankt-Peterburg were main centers of the protest activity.
There is another dangerous detail. In some cities (as Irkutsk in Siberia) the protest was led by the Communists. Former Communist Irkutsk governor mr.Levchenko (forced by Putin to resign) articulated strong position in support of mr.Navalny along with the leader of Moscow Communists mr.Rashkin.
This apparently tactical union of Russian liberal and left opposition could create many problems to pres.Putin and his corrupted government.
 
Last edited:
Another Sunday, another anti-Putin protest, and the weather will only get better from here.

'Chanting slogans against President Vladimir Putin, tens of thousands took to the streets Sunday across Russia’s vast expanse to demand the release of jailed opposition leader Alexei Navalny, keeping up the nationwide protests that have rattled the Kremlin. More than 3,300 people were detained by police, according to a monitoring group, and some were beaten.

'Russian authorities mounted a massive effort to stem the tide of demonstrations after tens of thousands rallied across the country last weekend in the largest, most widespread show of discontent that Russia has seen in years. Yet despite threats of jail terms, warnings to social media groups and tight police cordons, the protests again engulfed many cities on Sunday.'


 
Sounds like it was quite a day, but 'popular' protest has never had success in Russia (or elsewhere) without the backing of an element able to wield one of the instruments of national power.

'Tens of thousands took to the streets across Russia to show support for the jailed opposition leader Aleksei A. Navalny. The police were out in force and reports of brutality flared.

'The Kremlin mounted Russia’s most fearsome nationwide police operation in recent memory on Sunday, seeking to overwhelm a protest movement backing the jailed opposition leader Aleksei A. Navalny that swept across the country for a second weekend in a row.

'But the show of force — including closed subway stations, thousands of arrests and often brutal tactics — failed to smother the unrest. People rallied for Mr. Navalny on the ice of a Pacific bay and in the thousands in cities from Siberia to the Ural Mountains to St. Petersburg. In Moscow, protesters evaded a warren of checkpoints and lines of riot police officers to march in a column toward the jail where Mr. Navalny is being held, chanting, “All for one and one for all!”

'By late Sunday evening in Moscow, more than 5,000 people had been detained in at least 85 cities across Russia, an activist group reported, though many were later released. Previously unseen numbers of riot police officers in black helmets, camouflage and body armor essentially locked down the center of the metropolis of 13 million people, stopping passers-by miles from the protest to check their documents and ask what they were doing outside.

'The large-scale police response signaled anxiety in the Kremlin over Mr. Navalny’s ability to unite Russia’s disparate critics of President Vladimir V. Putin, from nationalists to liberals to many with no particular ideology at all.

'The next test for both sides will come on Tuesday, when Mr. Navalny faces a court hearing over alleged parole violations related to a six-year-old embezzlement case that could send him to prison for several years. Mr. Navalny’s allies — some of whom helped steer the rallies from outside the country via Twitter, Telegram and YouTube — declared Sunday’s demonstrations a success and quickly called for more protests outside the courthouse on Tuesday.

'Mr. Putin has faced growing discontent in the general public for several years amid a decline in real incomes and the dissipation of the patriotic fervor that accompanied his annexation of Crimea in 2014. Mr. Navalny has long been the Kremlin’s loudest critic, and he accused Mr. Putin of trying to kill him via a nerve-agent attack last summer.

'Still, no signs have emerged of support for the protesters within the government, the Parliament, big business or the security services, which all remain firmly in Mr. Putin’s grasp. Fissions in the elite, nowhere to be seen at least on the surface in Russia, have been pivotal in the success of street movements in other former Soviet states.'


https://www.washingtonpost.com/worl...6ff86c-5ffb-11eb-a177-7765f29a9524_story.html
 
Our expert advisers don't seem to be around much these days, must be awfully busy trying to disrupt things elsewhere.
 
So the court reached its verdict and Navalny is being jailed and sent to a penal colony. Somewhere remote is likely and somewhere where an "accident" or "incident" could easily be arranged.

In the meantime more heads will be cracked as the Neo-Tsar asserts his authority under the Muscovite Mindset. But the Muscovite monolith is dependent on the cult-like conditioning of its millions of muzhiks and many more are now refusing the leadership's lies.


 
So the court reached its verdict and Navalny is being jailed and sent to a penal colony. Somewhere remote is likely and somewhere where an "accident" or "incident" could easily be arranged.

In the meantime more heads will be cracked as the Neo-Tsar asserts his authority under the Muscovite Mindset. But the Muscovite monolith is dependent on the cult-like conditioning of its millions of muzhiks and many more are now refusing the leadership's lies.


Putin's thieving regime now is openly oppressive and Russia is nothing more than police state. I'm not surprised at all.
 
1612476193939.png


Good report from Bloomberg calling for the West to take more action against the corrupt clique running Russia:
 
Moscow upping the ante by expelling diplomats from Germany, Poland and Sweden:

Obviously the Kremlin thinks that it holds the whipping hand with the EU needing its vaccine:

Merkel condemns it:

The best thing Germany can do now is deny completion of Nordstream-2 and investigate Schroeder:
 
Another very on-topic report from Foreign Policy:

I believe that there is a possibility that the tipping point mentioned may force Putin to decide to implement extreme measures of repression against the democratic opposition. This is likely to include State-sanctioned executions of the top leadership/organisers (both in Russia and in exile), mass arrests and show-trials of the next echelons down with harsh sentencing on trumped up charges and a hoovering up by the State security apparatus of the rest of the participants for a general and un-gentle "re-education" process.

The cracks in the concrete poured over all the Russias that the Muscovite Mindset represents are getting wider and under this same mindset the primary tool of recourse is repression.
 
And from the Guardian / Observer, the main takeaway quote:
Leonid Volkov, a Navalny aide based in Lithuania, said Navalny’s determination to face down Putin was “quite rational”. ........... “Maybe we have to wait. It can happen that Putin will crawl on for another 10 years. But at the end of the day we will prevail,” he predicted.

 
And from the Guardian / Observer, the main takeaway quote:


Putin will die of old age eventually, if nothing else. The thing that should be worrying people is what comes after.

We know what Putin is like. There's no telling however what comes after and there's no reason to think that the political forces which brought Putin to power will produce a replacement that is more self-retrained than he has been.

Putin's Russia is Solzhenitsyn's ideas of Russian nationalism put into practice. Putin's successor is as likely to be a less restrained follower of these ideas as he is to be a fluffy lapdog of Western interests.
 
Putin will die of old age eventually, if nothing else. The thing that should be worrying people is what comes after.

We know what Putin is like. There's no telling however what comes after and there's no reason to think that the political forces which brought Putin to power will produce a replacement that is more self-retrained than he has been.

Putin's Russia is Solzhenitsyn's ideas of Russian nationalism put into practice. Putin's successor is as likely to be a less restrained follower of these ideas as he is to be a fluffy lapdog of Western interests.
Very true. The "Muscovite Mindset" is very hard to move away from.
 

Latest Threads

Top