Dedicated Russian thread

I watched the short video. It's very impressive, a modern cathedral in a classic style. The outer perimeter by the way is clearly intended to evoke the image of earthwork fortifications. Many classical Russian monasteries were surrounded by defensive walls of some sort.

It's hard to judge by just a short video which undoubtedly just shows the best bits, but overall it looks well done even if my own cultural tastes may differ. The artworks appear to have been done by a variety of artists with some being better than others.

It would be interesting to know how this has been received by the general public, whether they see it as a modern cultural and religious masterpiece, or whether they are outraged by the vast expense that seems to have been lavished on it. Perhaps @KGB_resident could enlighten us from his perspective.
I'm an atheist. However, from point of view of customs, habits, perception of the World I belong to and follow Russian cultural traditions greatly shaped by Orthodox Christianity. So my attitude to the Cathedral is positive. It is from my point of view a memorial build on the lands where the battle for Moscow happened. My Grandfather was badly wounded during the counter offensive and quite possible it happened not far from the Cathedral.
Attitude of ordinary Russians to the Cathedral ranges from neutral to positive. There were no any protests even from liberal opposition to Putin's regime.
It is not the first army/navy Cathedral in Russia.
The Starocherkassk and Novocherkassk cathedrals are considered the main spiritual centres of the Don Cossackdom. Matvey Platov, Vasily Orlov-Denisov, Yakov Baklanov and other atamans of the Don Cossack Host are buried in the church. A bronze statue of Yermak, the conqueror of Siberia, in front of the porch was designed by Mikhail Mikeshin
I have been there. The Cathedral is indeed very impressive.

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There are two navy Cathedrals in Sankt-Peterburg - in the city itsellf

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and on nearby island of Kronshtadt

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Also I would like to mention impressive Kazan Cathedral in Sankt-Peterburg

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Russians saw the cathedral primarily as a memorial to their victory over Napoleon.[3] Kutuzov himself was interred in the cathedral in 1813... In 1815 keys to seventeen cities and eight fortresses were brought by the victorious Russian army from Europe and placed in the cathedral's sacristy.
 
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Buried with this story on gay rights in Russia are three significant items.
Putin allies accuse Canada of interfering with Russia's gay marriage vote
One is that the vote covers Putin being able to continue to run for president indefinitely.

Another is there is a clause which would ban anyone who had residency in another country from running for president. This would apparently disqualify a number of Putin's critics from running.

The third point is that the referendum is apparently attracting little interest among average Russians. The implication seems to be that turn-out may be low.
 

offog

LE
Buried with this story on gay rights in Russia are three significant items.
Putin allies accuse Canada of interfering with Russia's gay marriage vote
One is that the vote covers Putin being able to continue to run for president indefinitely.

Another is there is a clause which would ban anyone who had residency in another country from running for president. This would apparently disqualify a number of Putin's critics from running.

The third point is that the referendum is apparently attracting little interest among average Russians. The implication seems to be that turn-out may be low.
Turn out will be high but the number of votes cast will be low and the eligible one ( the ones voting for what Putin wants) will be high.

It would be very funny if the number who turned up to voted was less than the number of votes counted.
 
Buried with this story on gay rights in Russia are three significant items.
Putin allies accuse Canada of interfering with Russia's gay marriage vote
One is that the vote covers Putin being able to continue to run for president indefinitely.

Another is there is a clause which would ban anyone who had residency in another country from running for president. This would apparently disqualify a number of Putin's critics from running.

The third point is that the referendum is apparently attracting little interest among average Russians. The implication seems to be that turn-out may be low.
1593544082813.png


By such a stupid action Canadian diplomats just help mr.Putin to fool the Russians exposing himself as a defender of traditional values.
 

Slime

LE
Bearing in mind which thread this is, and bearing in mind which poster has asked questions about Cyprus, the answers to his questions are very easy.

There are no British or Turkish troops in Cyprus.
Any military looking people there are private individuals and were welcomed there with open arms by the local population.

Job jobbed. :)
 
I'm an atheist. However, from point of view of customs, habits, perception of the World I belong to and follow Russian cultural traditions greatly shaped by Orthodox Christianity. So my attitude to the Cathedral is positive. It is from my point of view a memorial build on the lands where the battle for Moscow happened. My Grandfather was badly wounded during the counter offensive and quite possible it happened not far from the Cathedral.
Attitude of ordinary Russians to the Cathedral ranges from neutral to positive. There were no any protests even from liberal opposition to Putin's regime.
It is not the first army/navy Cathedral in Russia.

I have been there. The Cathedral is indeed very impressive.

View attachment 486031
View attachment 486032

There are two navy Cathedrals in Sankt-Peterburg - in the city itsellf

View attachment 486033

and on nearby island of Kronshtadt

View attachment 486034

Also I would like to mention impressive Kazan Cathedral in Sankt-Peterburg

View attachment 486035

I wonder how high the steeple is?

:rolleyes:
 

Slime

LE
The agreement that you refer to was not signed by 'Cyprus' but by some randomly picked private persons who lived on the Island. Lawfull Cypriot government never signed it. Greece and Turkey are merely third parties that were not allowed to decide any question related to territorial integrity of Cyprus.
Thus it is colonial era unjust forged document adopted without any participation of the people of Cyprus.

Really. And what NATO member country NATO tried to defend in Kosovo?

Really? Do you really believe it? But anyway NATO should follow 'the rules' and should not allow that its members violated 'the rules'.
Btw, do you think that Turkey violated 'the rules' in Cyprus?
Curious that a private Russian citizen decides to bring back up his opinions on Cyprus on a Sunday, then John Helmer takes it up on Monday
 
The Russian government do seem to be using Canada having voiced criticism of Russia as an opportunity to motivate those who would naturally support Putin to come out and vote.
Skip the following part of my post if you hate mathematics.
---------
Being a post graduate student in Moscow university in 1982 I tried to find a job place in one of Moscow's high schools. I even worked (without a contract) during a week in Moscow Pedagogical institute. There is a term in mathematics - A limit of a function in a point. In mathematics any term should be defined. The classical definition looks this way.
Definition. Number Y is a limit of function F=F(x) in point X if for any z>0 there exists a number d>0 and for any x that satisfies condition |x-X|<d absolute difference |F(x)-Y|<z.
It is clear that value of function F in point X is irrelevant in this definition. So I regarded with students following example.
Lets define F=F(x) this way: F(x)=0 for any x that is not equal to zero and F(0)=1.
According to the classical definition the function has a limit in point 0. The limit is equal to 0.
However, on the mathematical faculty the students were divided in two big parts with different lecturers. The first lecturer was the old school professor who followed the classical definition (that is absolutely right from my point of view). But the second lecturer (mrs Fyodorova) approached to me and warned that she in her lectures follows her teacher prof. Raykov who was a big fan of French mathematical group (school) Bourbaki
The Bourbaki group includes(d) several outstanding French mathematicians. But on many points they didn't follow classical definitions and approaches.
For example, in their definition of a limit of a function in a point the function should have value equal to the limit (in other words to be continuous in the point).
So in one group of students I pointed to the mentioned example of function and explained why it HAS a limit in point 0. But in another group using absolutely the same example of function I explained why the function HAS NOT a limit in point 0.
Definition matters. Change definition and previously correct statement could be wrong.
-----------------
Ther political circus with amendments to the Constitution was designed because of only one key point - Putin will be able to be elected on two additional terms (in 2024 and 2030). Other amendments are in fact a decoration and were intended to hide the key one.
One of these decorative amendments contain a definition of marriage.
Definition. Marriage is a union of a man and a woman.
Personally I don't see here any problem.
Definition. Civil partnership is a union of two persons with the same sex.
I don't understand why just a definition of word marriage that was used in its classical form for centuries is so big problem.
Canada itself extended the definition of marriage to include the same sex case relatively recently (in 2005). So why Canada does demand that others must follow its example? Other countries has right to use other definitions and it is not connected to human rights.
It should be said that the Russians are more conservative in matters related to traditional family values (than many Western nations) and from my point of view other countries should respect it.
The action performed by Canadian diplomats in Moscow is counter-productive and is used by Putin's men to blacken image of the West in the eyes of ordinary Russians.
 
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Slime

LE
As pointed out elsewhere, there has been a change of posting style.
 
News from the Moscow Times:

Russia Votes on Historic Amendments
The amendments pave the way for Putin to rule for 12 more years and enshrine conservative and populist measures in Russia's Constitution.

EXIT POLL
First Results Show Overwhelming Support for Russia’s Constitutional Reforms
Polling stations are still open in eight of Russia's 11 time zones.


The Moscow Times

Russians Set to Back Reforms Allowing Putin to Extend Rule - The Moscow Times

The following meme was part of a protest against the proposed reforms which now look as if they will pass.
1593617531822.png

The proposed constitutional amendments include a clause that would allow Putin to stay in power until the age of 83. memepedia.ru

Russia Wields Memes to Protest Putin's Constitutional Reforms - The Moscow Times

Plenty of other news being reported such as Coronovirus, people returning to work and voting despite a large percentage having the virus. One account suggests one in five Moscow residents have it.

Coronavirus in Russia: The Latest News | July 1 - The Moscow Times
 
Moscow authorities try to attract as many voters as possible. Those who visit polling station in Moscow 1 July are given by tickets of momental lottery. It is possible to win from 11 Pounds to 45. Those who win could use 'lucky' ticket in a supermarket to buy food.
 
Mrs. Ilyinski who lives in Israel has also Russian citizenship registered on dedicated site to vote. She voted but tried to test is it possible to vote in the consulate in Haifa. So she voted twice. Then she went to the embassy in Tel-Aviv and also voted. Her daughter who still is not 18yo also was given a ballot list.
As for the 'results' then they are predefined and are easily predictable
Turnout - no less than 2/3
Votes for - no less than 3/4
It doesn't matter how many voted and how they voted - the result would be forged, falsified if needed.
 
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Slime

LE
Mrs. Ilyinski who lives in Israel has also Russian citizenship registered on dedicated site to vote. She voted but tried to test is it possible to vote in the consulate in Haifa. So she voted twice. Then she went to the embassy in Tel-Aviv and also voted. Her daughter who still is not 18yo also was given a ballot list.
As for the 'results' then they are predefined and are easily predictable
Turnout - no less than 2/3
Votes for - no less than 3/4
It doesn't matter how many voted and how they voted - the result would be forged, falsified if needed.
Thank you for your link to someone living OUTSIDE of Russia, the third hand info is at least something to read.

As you are in Russia and will have had the opportunity to witness Russian state organised vote rigging first hand it might have been more interesting to hear about something you have actually seen or experienced yourself.
 
As you are in Russia and will have had the opportunity to witness Russian state organised vote rigging first hand it might have been more interesting to hear about something you have actually seen or experienced yourself.
I found that account of how easily the authorities can bypass voting regulations quite interesting, not to mention pertinent.
 

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