Dedicated Russian thread

Thanks for that. Seems very strange.
I would like to add
State of Smoking in Russia | Foundation for a Smoke-Free World
Russia has one of the largest smoking populations in the world with nearly one-third of its adult population smoking cigarettes. After Russia ratified the FCTC in 2008, smoking rates decreased from 39.1 percent in 2009 to 31.0 percent in 2016.
 
There are many causes but I would like to outline the main one - alcoholism.
A recent study blamed alcohol for more than half the deaths (52%) among Russians aged 15 to 54 from 1990 to 2001. In recent years this number is falling but I fancy still is very high.
View attachment 405752
Male life expectancy in Russia is a catastrophe.
Alcoholism undoubtedly accounts for the large gap between male and female life expectancy.

However what is important to note is sharp drop in life expectancy for both males and females around the time of the collapse of the Soviet Union. This is usually explained by a sharp fall in living standards affecting diet and preventive care, and mass unemployment providing more time for excessive drinking.

There is a brief rise a few years later before another drop. This brief rise was not an actual recovery, but rather the people who would normally have died at that time were already dead, producing the illusion of a temporary recovery.

In the early 2000s economic reforms are taking place, the economy is recovering, diet and living standards improve, and changing social conditions (brought about to no small degree by changing economic circumstances) make drinking to excess less socially acceptable. This produced a sharp rise in life expectancy.

The other constituent countries of the former Soviet Union display a similar pattern, although the time scale for recovery will vary depending upon local circumstances.
 
Putin's government during the first years of his rule had done one important thing - in fact huge sovereign debt was eliminated and sound hard currency-golden reserves were accumulated. Huge money were not spent on doubtful populist projects but in the right way.
I don’t believe any leader could’ve made Russia any better until the economic reforms, oil prices rise etc.

The ‘collapsing’ of the Empire, withdrawal from former Sov and WarPac states, the whole ‘demoralisation’ of losing that empire would have taken a genius to turn around despite the $M’s given. That, a coup attempt, the first Chechen War, changes in borders, former client states wanting nothing to do with you etc all had an effect on the Russian and client states of its former empire. The fact that the main Russian federation didn’t break up further is not to be sniffed at.

It’s easy to blame Yeltsin, but the policy that seemed to work for Poland moving it from state controlled in its entirety to a market orientated economy, was clearly difficult for a country the size of Russia which has huge disparities in regions.

Having a city based solely for tractor production for example isn’t easy to diversify, especially as tractors may not be selling as well as they should.

Spending 20-25% of your GDP on ‘defence’ and all of a sudden you have something like 1 in 5 people who worked for the state not having a job, or not being paid.

There’s also what is happening elsewhere in the world. I for one saw house prices drop in the U.K. from a peak in the early 90’s, dropping and not hitting the same levels until the early noughties.

A world recession in ‘98 also affected oil and other prices. Not helped admittedly by interest rate hikes.

$22.6Bn loaned in ‘98:
The Jamestown Foundation
-which later led to a 90 day hold in paying back all debts as you weren’t raising enough in taxes to pay back the loans and their interest rates.
Fortunately for Russia and for mr.Putin high oil prices during the start of hus rule helped much to resolve many problems.
‘99 to 2000, saw a large increase which undoubtedly would’ve helped whoever was in power. The oligarchs were already well embedded by then buying state commodities at dirt cheap prices.

None of which addresses why you dismiss the protests as ineffective and that Putin is driving a coach and horses through your still young constitution. But then those questions can be uncomfortable.
 
None of which addresses why you dismiss the protests as ineffective and that Putin is driving a coach and horses through your still young constitution. But then those questions can be uncomfortable.
Massive protests are effective but liberal opposition in Moscow is able to gather no more than 20,000. For Moscow it is a drop in the ocean. Putin and his gang don't fear such protests as their forces (including riot police) are much more numerous.
The liberal opposition if they are serious has to unite, to form viable political party and register their candidates not as independent ones but as candidates from the political party.
It is effective way in comparation with such protest actions.
 
Massive protests are effective but liberal opposition in Moscow is able to gather no more than 20,000. For Moscow it is a drop in the ocean. Putin and his gang don't fear such protests as their forces (including riot police) are much more numerous.
I realise that, but then it's often that these protests are banned. The spontaneous ones would be much better if people thought they wouldn't be nicked again on some trumped up charge
The liberal opposition if they are serious has to unite, to form viable political party and register their candidates not as independent ones but as candidates from the political party.
I'll take your word for that as a Russian citizen
It is effective way in comparation with such protest actions.
A combination of both would be even more effective I believe.

Anyway, any thoughts on Putin riding a 'coach and horses' through your constitution? Whilst not strictly illegal, it does seem to be going against the idea of only serving two terms, which were increased from four to six years:
Article 81: Chapter 4. The President of the Russian Federation | The Constitution of the Russian Federation
1. The President of the Russian Federation shall be elected for six years by citizens of the Russian Federation on the basis of universal, equal, direct suffrage by secret ballot.

3. One and the same person may not be elected President of the Russian Federation for more than two terms running.

How it was originally:
Russian Constitution SECTION ONE Chapter 4.
1. The President of the Russian Federation shall be elected for a term of four years by the citizens of the Russian Federation on the basis of general, equal and direct vote by secret ballot.

3. No one person shall hold the office of President of the Russian Federation for more than two terms in succession.
 
The cover of this weeks Economist in Asia neatly summarises one of my recently posted arguments on this thread:
1564080253447.png


Story link here:
Partnership is much better for China than it is for Russia

The Chinese have figured the Russians into their long term plans and the oriental puppet-masters are pulling the strings in Moscow.
 
The Chinese have figured the Russians into their long term plans and the oriental puppet-masters are pulling the strings in Moscow.
Doubt that they're pulling these strings, damned counter revolutionaries, is there no end to them?
 
Russian opposition leader Navalny may have been poisoned: doctor - Reuters
Navalny may have been poisoned. Despite (according to his press), having no known allergies, he’s had ‘severe swelling of the face and skin redness’. The state doctor puts it down to ‘hives’. He’s imprisoned over the latest protests:
His spokeswoman Kira Yarmysh said Navalny had signs of an acute allergy with “severe swelling of the face and skin redness.”

A doctor at the hospital treating him told the Interfax news agency that Navalny had been diagnosed with hives and that he was feeling better.
Vasilyeva who has treated him in the past but only managed to glimpse him in the cell and speak briefly says she couldn’t rule out Navalny being poisoned. She’s also concerned that she can’t treat him:
But one doctor who has treated him in the past and was able to speak briefly with him and look at him through the crack of a door on Sunday said she could not rule out that he had been poisoned.

“We cannot rule out that toxic damage to the skin and mucous membranes by an unknown chemical substance was inflicted with the help of a ‘third party’,” Anastasia Vasilyeva, the doctor, wrote on Facebook.
 
Russian opposition leader Navalny may have been poisoned: doctor - Reuters
Navalny may have been poisoned. Despite (according to his press), having no known allergies, he’s had ‘severe swelling of the face and skin redness’. The state doctor puts it down to ‘hives’. He’s imprisoned over the latest protests:

Vasilyeva who has treated him in the past but only managed to glimpse him in the cell and speak briefly says she couldn’t rule out Navalny being poisoned. She’s also concerned that she can’t treat him:
Yes, it is possible that mr.Navalny was poisoned. Opposition activist doctor was not allowed to see him and examine his health. Though she managed to get his clothes and hairs to be tested (likely in Europe). So, let's wait for the results of the tests.
 
Yes, it is possible that mr.Navalny was poisoned. Opposition activist doctor was not allowed to see him and examine his health. Though she managed to get his clothes and hairs to be tested (likely in Europe). So, let's wait for the results of the tests.
Kremlin critic Navalny returned to jail despite poisoning fears - Reuters
Yep, tested by an independent lab. It won’t matter, if anything is found it will be denied. He’s back in prison and his Dr has requested cctv:
“He was really poisoned by some unknown chemical substance,” Olga Mikhailova, his lawyer, told reporters. “But what the substance was has not been established.”
One of the hospital doctor’s says a chemical substance has not been proven and he’s not in danger:
Elena Sibikina, one of the doctors who treated Navalny, told reporters that the idea that he had been poisoned with a chemical substance had “not been proven”. She said his life was not in danger.
She’s trying to get his jail time reduced as well as the samples checked and cctv request:
Mikhailova, his lawyer, said she would file an appeal to try to get his jail time cut short due to his health problems.

His personal doctor, Anastasia Vasilyeva, said she had taken samples of his hair and a T-shirt to be tested at an independent laboratory for signs he had been poisoned.

She said she also wanted CCTV footage of his cell to be examined.
 
It should be said that it is not so difficult problem to establish a political party in Russia. You have to gather only 500 future party members, accept party statute and register the party - that's all.
By contrast registration of candidate during Moscow city Duma elections is a big problem. You have to collect 5000 signatures in your constituency. It is almost impossible task - but not for the candidates from the ruling regime. They prefer to be registered as 'independent' candidates, not formally connected to pro-Putin's the United Russia party. Of course (strictly controlled) electoral commissions accept their lists with signatures without questions. But
«Одной рукой на одном листе одинаковые закорючки». Интервью с депутатом, которая смогла доказать подделку подписей за «единороссов»
A member of an electoral commission (one of the few really not connected to the regime) discovered signature of his wife in support for 'independent' candidate closely connected to the regime. Of course the signature was falsified.
Ms.Yengalycheva, registered candidate from the Communist party initiated independent verification of the lists with signatures in support for pro-regime candidates. There are 2 dates on any list - date when the list is presented to the electoral commission and date when it was verified by it. It appeared that some lists were verified fefore they came to the electoral commission. On some lists apparently the signatures were made by one hand.
At the same time liberal candidates have too few supporters and had to hire (sometimes random) signatures collectors. It appears that some of them were 'embedded' collectors who intentionally spoiled the lists with signatures.
Morale - to be elected you must have a lot of devoted supporters.
 
....Morale - to be elected you must have a lot of devoted supporters.
Moral The moral of the story is...

The morale of the protestors is poor due to ‘Putin and his crooks and thieves’.

Moral - Wikipedia
Morale - Wikipedia

Why the Russian Local Elections Matter
This article mentions 5 - 10% and gaining even more due to the inevitable rejection of some signatories:
For those at the gubernatorial and regional level, part of their registration involves collecting a certain amount of signatures from the lower-level municipal deputies, this is commonly known as the ‘municipal filter’. Potential candidates must collect 5-10% of their deputy’s signatures to show that they have a certain level of endorsement and approval.
......
For example, Alexander Solovyev is running for a regional office in Moscow. For his registration, he had to collect 7,000 hand-written signatures from various neighborhoods in his electoral district. Though the required number of signatures is only around 5,500, electoral commissioners pride themselves in finding reasons to reject signatures. Thus, Alexander felt it necessary to give himself a 10% margin
 
17 yo Olga Misik sounded the text of the Constitution to riot police personnel.

1564471829077.png
 
The future of the Russias depends on people like this.
And just for clarity, I mean the young lady, not the goons.
Agreed. However, even many policemen understand the real situation in Russia. But they need their (respectively big) salary. Many have families, children.
Btw, according to opinion poll agency Levada center
Президент: доверие и голосование
54% of the Russians wish to see mr.Putin as a president even after 2024 but
38% don't wish.
If presidential elections have to happen tomorrow then (only) 40% would vote for Putin.
Another opinion poll agency VTsIOM
https://wciom.ru/news/ratings/doverie_politikam/
reports that Putin's trust level is (only) 31%
Still Putin in popular in Russia but not super popular.
 
Agreed. However, even many policemen understand the real situation in Russia. But they need their (respectively big) salary. Many have families, children.
Btw, according to opinion poll agency Levada center
Президент: доверие и голосование
54% of the Russians wish to see mr.Putin as a president even after 2024 but
38% don't wish.
If presidential elections have to happen tomorrow then (only) 40% would vote for Putin.
Another opinion poll agency VTsIOM
https://wciom.ru/news/ratings/doverie_politikam/
reports that Putin's trust level is (only) 31%
Still Putin in popular in Russia but not super popular.
Who else is there as an alternative that enough people would vote for?
 
Putin ally warns opposition protesters: We won't allow anarchy - Reuters
Navalny’s supporters are looking at holding further protests next Saturday. One wonders how they view the protests in Hong Kong.

Meanwhile, one of Putin’s ‘crooks and thieves’ Sobyanin, the current Mayor of Moscow who has been in post since 2010 and has much to lose if opposition parties can be elected, has said that they won’t ‘allow anarchy’. He says nothing about opposition candidates being ineligible in local elections:
“How do I assess them? As mass disorder well planned in advance,” Sobyanin told the TV Centre television channel when asked to say what he thought of Saturday’s events.

The protesters “tried to block roads, block streets and assault police officers. They simply forced the police to use force”, he said.
Sobyanin mentions the violent examples from Russia’s past, says order will be maintained and that there’s no other way:
“Anarchy, disorder and lawlessness make real problems worse and end in tragedy,” said Sobyanin.

“There are more than enough examples in our country’s history. Order will be maintained and it cannot be any other way.”
 
Putin ally warns opposition protesters: We won't allow anarchy - Reuters
Navalny’s supporters are looking at holding further protests next Saturday. One wonders how they view the protests in Hong Kong.

Meanwhile, one of Putin’s ‘crooks and thieves’ Sobyanin, the current Mayor of Moscow who has been in post since 2010 and has much to lose if opposition parties can be elected, has said that they won’t ‘allow anarchy’. He says nothing about opposition candidates being ineligible in local elections:

Sobyanin mentions the violent examples from Russia’s past, says order will be maintained and that there’s no other way:
Basically saying that the Tsar has every right to send the Cossacks in to massacre the bothersome hoi polloi. Typical of the Muscovite Mindset.
 
A new trick invented by Putin's regime emerged.
Candidates to be elected in Moscow city Duma (as other candidates) have to fill special form about property and bank accounts abroad. Two Communists candidates left cell about property abroad blanc as they don't have and didn't have any such property. They are ordinary people, not rich at all. But they had to write in the respective cell word OTSUTSTVUYET = Nothing, Other (pro-regime) candidates filled lawsuit to the court and the Communist candidates lost their registration - are not allowed to take part in the elections.
 
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