Decorated SAS commander is forced to quit...

#1
As reported on BBC News and in the Daily Mail amongst others...

Dail Mail Article

What do we think - surely it is important for a Commander to be able to lead as he see's fit, he was obviously seen to be good enough at his job to be able to command the SAS so for god's sake let him get on and command!!
 
#2
The pie-so tw*t was just doing for the LOA, either that or he has a seriously unhappy home-life. :D
 
#6
maxi_77 said:
Some sources are suggesting that he is leaving because of the big salary offered by one of the security companies.
Thats a typically cynical view. A man who opts to get stuck in rather than direct operations from the rear is unlikely to be the sort of character who can be financially incentivised.
 
#8
Can't remember which paper, but one of them also brings up mendoca & Collins as examples of how MOD treats good leaders, scared of a Coup are they?
 
#9
FFBox said:
Can't remember which paper, but one of them also brings up mendoca & Collins as examples of how MOD treats good leaders, scared of a Coup are they?
Possibly, the RAF excels in the promotion of mediocrity and we haven't started a coup yet.
 
#10
A member of the Forces choses to leave-big deal. We all have that option and can leave for whatever reason; lack of job satisfaction, better money on the outside, not being able to do what we used to because we are too senior, old, injured or whatever. Frankly this is a non-story
 
#12
devexwarrior said:
A member of the Forces choses to leave-big deal. We all have that option and can leave for whatever reason; lack of job satisfaction, better money on the outside, not being able to do what we used to because we are too senior, old, injured or whatever. Frankly this is a non-story
Agree, however add the tag of 'SAS' to the story and you have a nice juicy tit bit.
 
#13
The Times
The head of the SAS has resigned from the elite army regiment “for personal reasons”, defence sources said last night.

... Previous SAS commanders have included General Sir Michael Rose, who fought with the regiment in the 1982 Falklands conflict, and General Sir Peter de la Billière, who led the British force in the Gulf War in 1991 after the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait.
...The lieutenant-colonel’s future money-earning prospects in the civilian world will be unrivalled. As head of the most famous regiment in the world he will be able to command a big salary in a security company. When he leaves the Army he is expected to be recruited by one of the top companies who are winning big contracts in Iraq.

At least 10,000 people are now operating in Iraq with private security companies, all of which rely on ex-special forces soldiers to perform the dangerous roles that are needed in a country suffering from increasingly sophisticated insurgency groups.

However, as a senior officer and with his SAS background, the lieutenant-colonel is likely to be snapped up as a director of one of the private security companies.
 
#14
Fair do's Max :D

Seems different papers, different spin

The Telegraph (thanks to Nony Mouse for the link) has it that

Friends said he felt that he had achieved all he wanted. "He has had a really great time, and got to the zenith of his career and feels there is nothing better than that," said a fellow officer.
 
#16
FFBox said:
Can't remember which paper, but one of them also brings up mendoca & Collins as examples of how MOD treats good leaders, scared of a Coup are they?
The Scum - I followed the link from another thread earlier today. Tom Newton Dunn, as ever, goes into overdrive the second the words "Special Forces" are unleashed... :roll:
 
#17
A bit of a difficult one this one ! I think it is all about the mod not wanting to give the taliban al-qaeda the propoganda if the colonel did get killed in action on the front line! Imagine the headlines bad enough when the major got killed recently! His regiment were regular infantry and it was a massive boost for al qaeda and if they killed the co of the sas ? like i said difficult one to comment on! But never the less a huge loss! as there are not too many men capable of commanding the sas i would imagine!
 
#18
When will people stop getting over-excited about exagerated press reports of routine military business.

The media do not understand that officers decide to leave every day - in this case as his friends said, he'd achieved what he wanted to.

It is the journalist's job to sell papers and if they can sex up a story to do this, they will. If you want balance, read a selection of papers or watch the BBC who get taxpayers money to be balanced - Err... Oh no, that doesn't work any more does it?
 
#19
Could it be a jump or get pushed out moment?

Remember this government has screwed so many good people that I would question the motives on why this was leaked?
 
#20
romach said:
Could it be a jump or get pushed out moment?

Remember this government has screwed so many good people that I would question the motives on why this was leaked?
Without knowing the background, I expect this is perfectly normal behaviour! The Telegraph makes much of it but ignores the hundreds of other 30 and 40-something officers who decide to quit because they have commanded their regiment/ship/wing and have their pension in their back pocket. Look at the RAF guys who leave because they can no longer fly!

I agree with you that the Government has screwed lots of people but not necessarily in this case; and I agree with previous posters that this is a non-story!

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