Decent General History of the Cold War

I'm after a decent general history of the Cold War period. Its for my daughter who is doing it for GCSE. She can spout dates and events, but has no general understanding of the overall picture. What I think she needs is to be able to read around the subject beyond the crappy "bitesize" type approach of the national curriculum.

Is there anything that sets it out in relatively easy to understand terms, and covers the whole period - say 1945 to 1995?
 
The Cold War. A military history

By david Miller.

Explains why nuclear weapons were needed.
 
Gaddis, John Lewis. The Cold War: The Deals, the Spies, the Lies, the Truth. Penguin Books, London, 2007. ISBN 978-0-141-02532-2

Stone, Norman. The Atlantic and Its Enemies: A History of the Cold War. Penguin Books, London, 2011. ISBN 978-0-141-04463-7
 
Thanks for all your helpful replies. I bought John Gaddis's book in Waterstones today.

And thanks to Accidental Discharge for the thread link. I started reading it at work this afternoon and will have another look over a glass of wine later.

As someone for whom Cold War Berlin was my first posting I still find it hard to think of the Cold War as history rather than current affairs.
 

4(T)

LE
As someone for whom Cold War Berlin was my first posting I still find it hard to think of the Cold War as history rather than current affairs.


Don't worry, looks like its coming back again anyway...


I knew there was a good reason for keeping all those MFO boxes in my garage all this time, full of noddy suits and old BAOR map sheets.
 
Thanks for all your helpful replies. I bought John Gaddis's book in Waterstones today.

And thanks to Accidental Discharge for the thread link. I started reading it at work this afternoon and will have another look over a glass of wine later.

As someone for whom Cold War Berlin was my first posting I still find it hard to think of the Cold War as history rather than current affairs.
It's still very relevant.

And to quote Nye Bevan.

Why so I need a crystal ball when I can read a history book
 
Don't worry, looks like its coming back again anyway...


I knew there was a good reason for keeping all those MFO boxes in my garage all this time, full of noddy suits and old BAOR map sheets.
I'll go one better. I've still got a bfg fuel map. Priceless.
 
It's still very relevant.

And to quote Nye Bevan.

Why so I need a crystal ball when I can read a history book

And to quote 'Not The Nine O'clock News':

"At times like this, I like to think what old Nye Bevin would have done. I'm pretty sure he would have shat in his pants!"

Anyone remember that one?
 
On a more serious note, try googling 'Protect and Survive.'
It gives an insight into how seriously the possibility of things going atomic was taken in UK.
Might get an extra mark as a reference in a piece of coursework.
 
Thanks for all your helpful replies. I bought John Gaddis's book in Waterstones today.

And thanks to Accidental Discharge for the thread link. I started reading it at work this afternoon and will have another look over a glass of wine later.

As someone for whom Cold War Berlin was my first posting I still find it hard to think of the Cold War as history rather than current affairs.

Same for me. My daughter was born one year after the wall fell and has no memory of it, but for me, it still feels funny to see Bundeswehr uniforms in Berlin, and not American, British, French or Russian ones.
 

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