Death for Afghan who dared to read about womens rights

Discussion in 'Current Affairs, News and Analysis' started by Blogg, Feb 1, 2008.

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  1. Read this sort of thing and have to wonder why anyone would ever bother with such a dismal sh1thole. Oooo I remember now........

    Sentenced to death: Afghan who dared to read about women's rights

    A young man, a student of journalism, is sentenced to death by an Islamic court for downloading a report from the internet. The sentence is then upheld by the country's rulers. This is Afghanistan – not in Taliban times but six years after "liberation" and under the democratic rule of the West's ally Hamid Karzai
  2. Try it: let us know how you get on
  3. So would someone please explain to me, why are we in a country, supporting the gov't and fighting their enemy, when the gov't does things like this?
  4. Because deep down we are weak.

    And we have a Government with a moral compass that it uses as a fan.

    And we don't criticise Islam.

    And because, who knows, Afghanistan might have a lot of oil.
  5. Allah really doesnt dig chics.
  6. Strikes me that a war was fought so that the west could give patronage to a bunch of warlord, war crime bigots who were wanting due reward for their part in the overthrow of the Talibs.

    Afg is a very conservative society, getting more conservative by the week. Tyranny has been replaced and sanctioned by another form of tyranny. A huge mistake. I read over the weekend that Karzai blocked Paddy Ashdown's appointment partly because of fear, amongst the corrupt warlords running the country, that they would be tried for war crimes because of hefty powers about to be given to the former marine.

    Karzai knows who he needs to keep sweet, to retain his own position. Just imagine what it must be like to be a woman in this society.

    "The question is whether the leopards have grown new spots or just cloaked the old ones. Human Rights Watch estimates that 60% of MPs have links to warlordism. The organisation singled out Abdul Rasul Sayyaf, a powerful militia commander whose guns ravaged Kabul in the 1990s, and Marshall Fahim, a former defence minister accused of war crimes.

    "There is widespread cynicism about this parliament. How can people trust a government which allows warlords and notorious human rights abusers into power?" said Sam Zarifi of Human Rights Watch."

    The Afghan parliament has approved an amnesty for warlords and others accused of war crimes that could possibly include the Taliban leader, Mullah Muhammad Omar.
    The vote drew sharp criticism from human rights groups, the UN and some parliamentarians who insist that the perpetrators of rape, murder and other atrocities must be brought to justice.

    "This is not a law, this is about more power for the mujahideen. Millions of Afghans will be unhappy," said Shukria Barakzai, a woman parliamentarian who stormed out of the Wolesi Jirga, or lower house, in protest.

    "The resolution called for national reconciliation and criticised human rights reports that "name and shame" alleged war criminals. But analysts said it does not have the force of law, which would require the consent of the upper house and President Hamid Karzai."
  7. My Bold. Does that mean he is stylistically challenged?