Death does it hold any fears?

A few months ago I saw a smear of blood on my morning log. Off to the doctor. A few tests and then into the local hospital for a sigmoidoscopy; interesting view that i'd never had before. After fighting her way through the diverticulitis the attractive young camera operator found a polyp. Despite the professionalism exhibited there was an obvious hush on the room and a change of tone. I was given reassuring words, a sandwich and sent off home.

Back a few weeks later for the full colonoscopy. During this they removed the polyp. Lasooed it and snipped it off. It took two goes and was clearly not producing the best hoped for result. Still. I got my first tatoo. Unfortunately not where I can show anyone. Another sandwich and reassuring noises and a sent home for a wait while they did tests on the snipped bit.

A whole body MRI is carried out. Definitely only a routine procedure, just to make sure it is all as normal and as inconsequential as everyone is confident that it is.

I was called back to talk about future management. So, an appointment with a consultant which was arranged with a phonecall saying 'nothing serious was found and all is well, nothing to worry about'. The appointment occurs, during which he says it is cancerous and the best thing to do is to take out the bad bit. So far so routine. As the conversation continued it appears (nicely pointed out on the laminated diagram in his folder) that the routine procedure is to remove about eighteen inches of my bowel and the associated lymph nodes as well as a number of other bits and pieces, but 'don't worry there probably wont be a need for a bag, although we will ask for permission to fit one if necessary'. Then the pre admission meeting and a bit of, what could have developed into counselling if they'd had their way.

In just sixteen days from MRI to admission it has gone from trivial to an operation with about a 70% survival rate (admittedly it is usually done on much older and iller patients) which will potentially remove the threat of early death from cancer and extend expectancy from, up to, about eight years to a full lifespan.

Back on thread: The strange thing is, that at no stage have I felt the depression or sense of impending doom that the, very nice, nurse warned me of. Even the 30% negative outcome hasn't got to me. The diagnosis of cancer with a life limiting prognosis hasn't had an effect. I haven't felt the need to tell anyone (till now) and I'll either wake up and get on with life or I shan't.

I've spent most of my life trusting experts and 'the kit', in fact for much of it I've been the 'expert' and/or the bloke who rigs and checks the kit. I simply trust them. This is to the extent that they thought I was not engaging and didn't understand the seriousness of the situation. They explored the background; military, overseas work, adrenaline sports, parachuting etc.. Their conclusion seems to be that this has taken the 'panic reaction' out of it. They have found this with a few ex military.

Of course I have an anticipation of what is about to happen. I described it as being like 'waiting to have a wisdom tooth out, without anaesthetic'. This didn't seem to satisfy them, so I added 'while being shot'. It made them happier but didn't change my view.

In summary, the procedure holds no fears for me and neither does the possibility of death.

Maybe I'll update you. Unless I'm in the 30%;)
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
A few months ago I saw a smear of blood on my morning log. Off to the doctor. A few tests and then into the local hospital for a sigmoidoscopy; interesting view that i'd never had before. After fighting her way through the diverticulitis the attractive young camera operator found a polyp. Despite the professionalism exhibited there was an obvious hush on the room and a change of tone. I was given reassuring words, a sandwich and sent off home.

Back a few weeks later for the full colonoscopy. During this they removed the polyp. Lasooed it and snipped it off. It took two goes and was clearly not producing the best hoped for result. Still. I got my first tatoo. Unfortunately not where I can show anyone. Another sandwich and reassuring noises and a sent home for a wait while they did tests on the snipped bit.

A whole body MRI is carried out. Definitely only a routine procedure, just to make sure it is all as normal and as inconsequential as everyone is confident that it is.

I was called back to talk about future management. So, an appointment with a consultant which was arranged with a phonecall saying 'nothing serious was found and all is well, nothing to worry about'. The appointment occurs, during which he says it is cancerous and the best thing to do is to take out the bad bit. So far so routine. As the conversation continued it appears (nicely pointed out on the laminated diagram in his folder) that the routine procedure is to remove about eighteen inches of my bowel and the associated lymph nodes as well as a number of other bits and pieces, but 'don't worry there probably wont be a need for a bag, although we will ask for permission to fit one if necessary'. Then the pre admission meeting and a bit of, what could have developed into counselling if they'd had their way.

In just sixteen days from MRI to admission it has gone from trivial to an operation with about a 70% survival rate (admittedly it is usually done on much older and iller patients) which will potentially remove the threat of early death from cancer and extend expectancy from, up to, about eight years to a full lifespan.

Back on thread: The strange thing is, that at no stage have I felt the depression or sense of impending doom that the, very nice, nurse warned me of. Even the 30% negative outcome hasn't got to me. The diagnosis of cancer with a life limiting prognosis hasn't had an effect. I haven't felt the need to tell anyone (till now) and I'll either wake up and get on with life or I shan't.

I've spent most of my life trusting experts and 'the kit', in fact for much of it I've been the 'expert' and/or the bloke who rigs and checks the kit. I simply trust them. This is to the extent that they thought I was not engaging and didn't understand the seriousness of the situation. They explored the background; military, overseas work, adrenaline sports, parachuting etc.. Their conclusion seems to be that this has taken the 'panic reaction' out of it. They have found this with a few ex military.

Of course I have an anticipation of what is about to happen. I described it as being like 'waiting to have a wisdom tooth out, without anaesthetic'. This didn't seem to satisfy them, so I added 'while being shot'. It made them happier but didn't change my view.

In summary, the procedure holds no fears for me and neither does the possibility of death.

Maybe I'll update you. Unless I'm in the 30%;)
Kinell. Good luck. See you soon, posting about inconsequential stuff like the rest of us.
 
That's about right. I did my gliding scholarship with the ATC in 1995. GP did my medical! I have no binocular vision, and am short_sighted in my right eye. As I only use my left yet have a full field of vision, I was waved through.

I use a lense in my right now, though.

...and I thought I wasn't fit for purpose, a colour blind electrician, HTF did I survive 50+ years as a sparky?.
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
A few months ago I saw a smear of blood on my morning log. Off to the doctor. A few tests and then into the local hospital for a sigmoidoscopy; interesting view that i'd never had before. After fighting her way through the diverticulitis the attractive young camera operator found a polyp. Despite the professionalism exhibited there was an obvious hush on the room and a change of tone. I was given reassuring words, a sandwich and sent off home.

Back a few weeks later for the full colonoscopy. During this they removed the polyp. Lasooed it and snipped it off. It took two goes and was clearly not producing the best hoped for result. Still. I got my first tatoo. Unfortunately not where I can show anyone. Another sandwich and reassuring noises and a sent home for a wait while they did tests on the snipped bit.

A whole body MRI is carried out. Definitely only a routine procedure, just to make sure it is all as normal and as inconsequential as everyone is confident that it is.

I was called back to talk about future management. So, an appointment with a consultant which was arranged with a phonecall saying 'nothing serious was found and all is well, nothing to worry about'. The appointment occurs, during which he says it is cancerous and the best thing to do is to take out the bad bit. So far so routine. As the conversation continued it appears (nicely pointed out on the laminated diagram in his folder) that the routine procedure is to remove about eighteen inches of my bowel and the associated lymph nodes as well as a number of other bits and pieces, but 'don't worry there probably wont be a need for a bag, although we will ask for permission to fit one if necessary'. Then the pre admission meeting and a bit of, what could have developed into counselling if they'd had their way.

In just sixteen days from MRI to admission it has gone from trivial to an operation with about a 70% survival rate (admittedly it is usually done on much older and iller patients) which will potentially remove the threat of early death from cancer and extend expectancy from, up to, about eight years to a full lifespan.

Back on thread: The strange thing is, that at no stage have I felt the depression or sense of impending doom that the, very nice, nurse warned me of. Even the 30% negative outcome hasn't got to me. The diagnosis of cancer with a life limiting prognosis hasn't had an effect. I haven't felt the need to tell anyone (till now) and I'll either wake up and get on with life or I shan't.

I've spent most of my life trusting experts and 'the kit', in fact for much of it I've been the 'expert' and/or the bloke who rigs and checks the kit. I simply trust them. This is to the extent that they thought I was not engaging and didn't understand the seriousness of the situation. They explored the background; military, overseas work, adrenaline sports, parachuting etc.. Their conclusion seems to be that this has taken the 'panic reaction' out of it. They have found this with a few ex military.

Of course I have an anticipation of what is about to happen. I described it as being like 'waiting to have a wisdom tooth out, without anaesthetic'. This didn't seem to satisfy them, so I added 'while being shot'. It made them happier but didn't change my view.

In summary, the procedure holds no fears for me and neither does the possibility of death.

Maybe I'll update you. Unless I'm in the 30%;)

Having read your post with interest, I've come to the conclusion that you're probably just bloody old.

It's normal for young people to fear death because it is (or should be) unfamiliar to them.

As to having wisdom teeth out, I've had three extracted over the past few years, also two really nice crowns done. Each time I looked forward to visiting the dentist as it was a chance to put my feet up and have someone do something for me for a change!
 
Having read your post with interest, I've come to the conclusion that you're probably just bloody old.

It's normal for young people to fear death because it is (or should be) unfamiliar to them.

As to having wisdom teeth out, I've had three extracted over the past few years, also two really nice crowns done. Each time I looked forward to visiting the dentist as it was a chance to put my feet up and have someone do something for me for a change!
Yeah, drill holes in your fucking swede. Brilliant :)
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
At her advanced years any sort of drilling is welcome.

Is that an offer?

Better bring Glamdring to hack through the webs ...
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
A few months ago I saw a smear of blood on my morning log. Off to the doctor. A few tests and then into the local hospital for a sigmoidoscopy; interesting view that i'd never had before. After fighting her way through the diverticulitis the attractive young camera operator found a polyp. Despite the professionalism exhibited there was an obvious hush on the room and a change of tone. I was given reassuring words, a sandwich and sent off home.

Back a few weeks later for the full colonoscopy. During this they removed the polyp. Lasooed it and snipped it off. It took two goes and was clearly not producing the best hoped for result. Still. I got my first tatoo. Unfortunately not where I can show anyone. Another sandwich and reassuring noises and a sent home for a wait while they did tests on the snipped bit.

A whole body MRI is carried out. Definitely only a routine procedure, just to make sure it is all as normal and as inconsequential as everyone is confident that it is.

I was called back to talk about future management. So, an appointment with a consultant which was arranged with a phonecall saying 'nothing serious was found and all is well, nothing to worry about'. The appointment occurs, during which he says it is cancerous and the best thing to do is to take out the bad bit. So far so routine. As the conversation continued it appears (nicely pointed out on the laminated diagram in his folder) that the routine procedure is to remove about eighteen inches of my bowel and the associated lymph nodes as well as a number of other bits and pieces, but 'don't worry there probably wont be a need for a bag, although we will ask for permission to fit one if necessary'. Then the pre admission meeting and a bit of, what could have developed into counselling if they'd had their way.

In just sixteen days from MRI to admission it has gone from trivial to an operation with about a 70% survival rate (admittedly it is usually done on much older and iller patients) which will potentially remove the threat of early death from cancer and extend expectancy from, up to, about eight years to a full lifespan.

Back on thread: The strange thing is, that at no stage have I felt the depression or sense of impending doom that the, very nice, nurse warned me of. Even the 30% negative outcome hasn't got to me. The diagnosis of cancer with a life limiting prognosis hasn't had an effect. I haven't felt the need to tell anyone (till now) and I'll either wake up and get on with life or I shan't.

I've spent most of my life trusting experts and 'the kit', in fact for much of it I've been the 'expert' and/or the bloke who rigs and checks the kit. I simply trust them. This is to the extent that they thought I was not engaging and didn't understand the seriousness of the situation. They explored the background; military, overseas work, adrenaline sports, parachuting etc.. Their conclusion seems to be that this has taken the 'panic reaction' out of it. They have found this with a few ex military.

Of course I have an anticipation of what is about to happen. I described it as being like 'waiting to have a wisdom tooth out, without anaesthetic'. This didn't seem to satisfy them, so I added 'while being shot'. It made them happier but didn't change my view.

In summary, the procedure holds no fears for me and neither does the possibility of death.

Maybe I'll update you. Unless I'm in the 30%;)
I recently went through the examination and colonoscopy but came out with a clean slate, but it was a bit worrying wondering what would happen to my family if it turned out to be something serious.

I hope everything goes well for you. Best of luck.
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
It's normal for grandparents to go first, then parents, and so on in the normal way.

Just had a call from a "mature" student of mine - I knew something was wrong when I missed a call from her last night, she left a message to say she would call at 1000 today.

Her son has been diagnosed with Stage 4 bone cancer which has spread to liver and lungs.

Why is life so fucking shitty??
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Her son has been diagnosed with Stage 4 bone cancer which has spread to liver and lungs.

Why is life so ******* shitty??
Its a rare day to be able to skate in hell but I'm with Stephen Fry on the issue of if there is a god why does childhood leukemia exist?
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
Its a rare day to be able to skate in hell but I'm with Stephen Fry on the issue of if there is a god why does childhood leukemia exist?

Indeed.

My friend's son is probably in his late thirties and father to a young son of his own, no more than two years old.
 

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