Death does it hold any fears?

ugly

LE
Moderator
Facing up to old age and I used to be worried that my sons would be stuck without me doing everything for them. Trust me Ive tried but realised its a one way trip to depression. The reason Ive started this thread isn't to get all maudlin or even god bothering but to say simply (misquoting someone famous or infamous no doubt) that if you have only death itself to fear then death should hold no fear for you.
I'm not being a hero or anything but I have sort of lined up my ducks and I know that once I am dead there is sod all that I can do about it so there you have it I dont actually give a tinkers cuss about dying, the afterlife, any fanciful story about the ever after or my non existent soul. I am but a (slightly warped) collection of cells bunged together many years ago approaching expiry and its something that whilst I am not in a rush to accelerate doesn't bother me much anymore.



Posted in the naafi for entertainment rather than help. There are enough mental health threads already and this isn't one of them, mental maybe but not healthy!
 
Well, I hope there's an afterlife but then again I buy lottery tickets so I must be a trusting mug.

The will is set up so my family get nothing which is reward for the general level of treatment and compassion they give me.

I'm leaving it split between an ex girlfriend from almost 30 years ago that I'm still friends with and an ex stripper friend from Florida for all the good times.


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The only thing that any of us can correctly prophecy about the future is that we are all going to die.

Might as well be positive about it.

The thought of letting go into the unknown is disquieting - makes me recoil instinctively. On the other hand, dying - everyone does it, what could be bad?
 
The means, more than the act, but I've been a Citizen for more than half my life now, so I'm less likely to be murdered than die of (un)natural causes.

Still hope it makes the news though.
 
I don't fear death, rather getting some sort of illness or disability that makes me unable to enjoy life anymore

One thing I know for sure though is that out of body experiences aren't any sign of a higher being, it's just the way your mind copes when your body is shutting down

Had it a few times now, and it's not scary it's just a bit weird
 
I have made 67 in extremely good health.
I am comfortably off.
I know I have a wonderful women waiting for me when I die.
I have left everything to the RBL, stuff my family.
Everything fine, I'll carry on normal jogging (metaphorically) till I drop of whatever I drop of.
 
i dont think an understanding that life could mallet you at any moment* and cut your time here short is necessarily a bad thing, if anything it should give you some motivation not to decide what is important to you and pursue it whether that is becoming a race car driver or working a dead end job because it feeds the kids and gives you the time you want with them.

as for the rest, if you cant control or influence it then put it out of your mind. shit will play out as it wants.

*personally, the slight downside to this is that i'm a hypochondriac. luckily i know this about myself and can then keep my mouth shut every time i think i've got a brain tumor**

**which is irrational and exactly the sort of thing you'd expect from the confused thinking you'd get with a brain tumor***

***fuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuck
 
It comes to us all and for those of us in our 7th decade (or more) it is ever present.
I just hope when it comes, it is quick. I won’t have to worry about it, but I don’t want those I love having to go through the mill of a long, drawn out death, where everyone feels the pain.
Anyhow, seeing it’s in the NAAFI, fcuk you mate - I’m not ready yet!
90799BDD-74C9-4482-901C-D37C26120CE4.jpeg
 
I have made 67 in extremely good health.
I am comfortably off.
I know I have a wonderful women waiting for me when I die.
I have left everything to the RBL, stuff my family.
Everything fine, I'll carry on normal jogging (metaphorically) till I drop of whatever I drop of.
donating your body to science? smart move, its the only way you'll get an 18 year old med student to play with your knob at your age.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
After a certain age it's impossible to enjoy life unless and until you've made peace with the fact of your mortality.
 
It comes to us all and for those of us in our 7th decade (or more) it is ever present.
I just hope when it comes, it is quick. I won’t have to worry about it, but I don’t want those I love having to go through the mill of a long, drawn out death, where everyone feels the pain.
Anyhow, seeing it’s in the NAAFI, fcuk you mate - I’m not ready yet!
View attachment 420557
But will it be the BLOKE himself, Mort or Miss Susan?
 
Neither of my parents, nor those of my wife, died peacefully in bed - all went as a result of heart attacks or in hospital with terminal cancer. At least the heart attacks were quick - the others lingered on for several weeks knowing what was coming but were so doped up on morphine at the end they didn't even feel it.

I came close some 30 years ago when I was 33 - rushed into hospital with viral meningitis and a 50:50 chance of making it through the night. It was a long time before I understood the effect it had on my wife.

These days I tend to think more about the Stoic concept of death and suffering:

Death is a release from all pains, and a boundary beyond which our sufferings cannot go; it returns us to that state of peacefulness in which we lay before we were born.



 
The main thing that bothers me is that I won't know whether I'll make it into the "Whatever happened to..." thread.

And, if I do, how long will it have been before anybody noticed.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
To quote Jerry Driscoll, "I'm not frightened of dying. Any time will do, I don't mind."
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
Neither of my parents, nor those of my wife, died peacefully in bed - all went as a result of heart attacks or in hospital with terminal cancer. At least the heart attacks were quick - the others lingered on for several weeks knowing what was coming but were so doped up on morphine at the end they didn't even feel it.

I came close some 30 years ago when I was 33 - rushed into hospital with viral meningitis and a 50:50 chance of making it through the night. It was a long time before I understood the effect it had on my wife.

These days I tend to think more about the Stoic concept of death and suffering:

Death is a release from all pains, and a boundary beyond which our sufferings cannot go; it returns us to that state of peacefulness in which we lay before we were born.
I cannot escape death, but at least I can escape the fear of it - Epictetus
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
The only thing to fear is fear itself! (Trite but true).

I expect it's very different for people who have dependents. We have none.

The only thing that pees me off is the old man seemingly wanting to be the richest man in the graveyard.
 
After a brush with bladder cancer 11 years ago I realised I wasn't immortal and that I had to re-think my attitude to life, etc.

The kids have all left home, all of them have got good jobs bar one who is never going to work again after shafting his back at work - all of them enjoy foreign holidays with good homes and their kids (the grandchildren). Mrs Dave and I instilled good ethics into them and it's worked out well for all concerned.

However, life has a habit of kicking you in the teeth when you least expect it and 5 years ago Mrs Dave had an accident whereby her car was written off. After a long period of analysis by various arms of the NHS it appears she has a type of dementia - I am now her carer, which diverts attention from my situation to making her comfortable as possible.

Every day is different - I wake up feeling good and wondering which woman will occupy my wifes body today - if you look past the trauma that this disease does to the person life can be full of shits and giggles. I just wish that occasionally the girl I married surfaced, but that's never going to happen.

So my life has changed to the point where I am now trying to make someone's final days as comfortable as possible - the humour that was instilled into me in my younger days by the Army has carried me through most days, but sometimes the dark clouds appear and it can be hard to dispel them.

I'm just happy that I wake up each day :)
 

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