DEALING WITH DRUG ADDICTS: A POISONED CHALICE?

Poppycock

War Hero
PTSD is completely different! An addict makes a choice to fill their system with that sh1t

Some PTS (it's not a disorder) sufferers turn to drugs to numb the emotional pain of what they've experienced

Most addicts turned to drugs to numb the emotional pain of what they've experienced

The difference is most military PTS sufferers volunteered for their experience, whilst your regular addict most likely had their traumatic experiences inflicted on them in childhood

Number one cause of addiction is our fucked up society, whether that's sending young soldiers to corrupt pointless un-winnable Wars in unarmoured land rovers or the poverty causing financial / social inequalities that are so very apparent in our society
 
Some PTS (it's not a disorder) sufferers turn to drugs to numb the emotional pain of what they've experienced

Most addicts turned to drugs to numb the emotional pain of what they've experienced

The difference is most military PTS sufferers volunteered for their experience, whilst your regular addict most likely had their traumatic experiences inflicted on them in childhood

Number one cause of addiction is our fucked up society, whether that's sending young soldiers to corrupt pointless un-winnable Wars in unarmoured land rovers or the poverty causing financial / social inequalities that are so very apparent in our society
Tie in the amount of soldiers who join up to escape the poverty causing financial/social inequalities in our society. The difference is a Service Person steps up for whatever reason, to serve their country. In doing so, if they get injured physically or mentally, then Society has a responsibility to care for them on their return.
Drug addicts are so because they chose that route, instead of seeking help. I refuse to believe that in the main it is because of personal background.
"Why did you get in to heroin, beat that Great Grandmother in her bed after you robbed her all so you can afford your next fix?"
"Dad buggered off when I was 5 and my mum slapped me about a bit"
Really?
 
Addiction is a form of illness. Be it addiction to gambling, tobacco, alcohol or any manner of substances slightly less legal, addiction is a form of mental leaning that leads onto the physical.
I knew a bloke called Budgie Byrne.
Ex West ham and England footballer. FA Cup winner
He was a big boozer, smoker (though he knew it was harmful), chased women, spent and lost a fortune on the ponies.
He admitted if drugs had been around at the time, he'd probably have been on them too.
Just an addict.
 
Tie in the amount of soldiers who join up to escape the poverty causing financial/social inequalities in our society.
I think most join for other reasons, but fair enough.
The difference is a Service Person steps up for whatever reason, to serve their country. In doing so, if they get injured physically or mentally, then Society has a responsibility to care for them on their return.
How was that going last time you checked?
Drug addicts are so because they chose that route, instead of seeking help. I refuse to believe that in the main it is because of personal background.
Is this not the case with any addict? Don't we hit the bottle before realising and going to AA?
"Why did you get in to heroin, beat that Great Grandmother in her bed after you robbed her all so you can afford your next fix?"
"Dad buggered off when I was 5 and my mum slapped me about a bit"
Really?
Or maybe "My grandad has been having sex with me since I was 9, and my mum let him look after me, knowing he would do it" Obviously that wouldn't give you PTSD, mess with your mental state and make you turn to drugs because it's easier than waiting for an appointment in 18 months time with the NHS. This incidentally, takes us back to your reasons why people join up?

As I have always said, "Politicians, taking your money, and distributing it very, very, very poorly."
 
Well you're obviously the SME on this, so why don't you regale us all with your infinite wisdom?
 
The first person I sent to prison - a start to finish job - was an addict. He'd nicked some meat and pulled a knife when challenged.

Turns out it was his 130th conviction in something like 18 years, and he'd spent most of those years actually inside. Looking through his conviction history, they were almost all possession / theft offences, occasionally he had waved a knife when challenged. He had never attacked someone with it, just waved it and legged it. He also didn't rob or burgle.

He got 2 years, but really it seemed to me that he needed help, not more time in the bin. He'd done all that to fund his addiction. Clearly locking him up wasn't addressing the underlying problem.
 

dabber69

Clanker
When I worked for the NHS I worked in a Dependency unit off and on and got speaking to one of the senior clinicians.

She stated the success rate of getting her clients off hard drugs was absolutely minimal something like 3-4%.

To get a smackhead through treatment start to finish was over 100K. There were a LOT of them

I don't know what the fix (get it) for this is but I see it as a waste of taxpayers money.
 
The original article has now been corrected - when I published I f*cked up and only published half of it - sorry. The article can now be read in full.
 
I’ve had two addicts in my life.

One (from a loving supportive middle-class family) went a bit odd when she hit 20 (I suspect a failed affair with her boss), and tried to kill herself from the resulting emotional fallout. She had a complete personality change and became a very nasty vindictive selfish person who caused splits in her close-knit family that took a decade to resolve. She is now generally shunned by the family as she’s just a grasping greedy selfish angry person with a high level of paranoia and sense of victimhood who only ever wants to interact with the family when she needs money. It’s never her fault.

Cannabis (that nice warm cuddly harmless recreational stuff) is the only drug she takes, she has wasted tens of thousands of £s of it, can’t get enough of it, smokes it, bakes with it, and even tried encouraging her younger sister to take it.

She is, without doubt, a toxic person and has forced her loving family away from herself.

The other person was a MOD civil servant who worked for me. He was from a stable working-class family (although I did detect hints of a possibly overbearing father and a controlling mother). He was also bullied at school (I don’t know if that had any bearing on his subsequent addiction). At work, his mood swings meant his behaviour would swing from being over-keen to get approval to full-on paranoia and aggression (I once had to physically block him from attacking a colleague over some fairly innocuous comment). This also combined with what I perceived as a problem with women (he once tried to get a sexual harassment case raised against a female colleague because she suggested they just avoided each other where possible because they didn’t like each other). He was a nightmare to manage and was a contributing factor to me going off work for several months with stress. MOD HR said they could do nothing to rein him in as long as he didn’t take drugs at work.

Again, his drug of choice was cannabis. He effectively bankrupted himself getting his fixed, caused massive family arguments and eventual alienation, and is, without doubt, another toxic person (which is a shame as, leaving his mood and attitude aside, he was a decent bloke and a good worker).

Because of these experiences, I am very much against drugs (especially “soft” drugs such as cannabis). If the only victims were the addicts themselves, I’d be sympathetic. However, I have seen (and experienced) the damage to those who love or work with addicts, and who have suffered through no fault of their own.

My sympathy is with the victims of the drug addicts (they don’t get a choice) and I feel that encouraging more “soft” drug use (e.g. by legalising) will just result in more selfish and paranoid people damaging those around them.

What I’d prefer is more effective ways of discouraging initial drug use (e.g. create a social stigma around it like we have done with drink-driving) and more effective ways of weaning people off hard drugs.
 
PTSD is completely different! An addict makes a choice to fill their system with that sh1t
My point was where should retired blokes 20% go? There's some who would say PTSD well if you can't take it shouldn't have joined. We live in a big society and pay enough tax where there should be treatment avenues for all ,yes originally it was their choice to try a drug but it's like alcoholism some can take it and leave it and other need more but somehow being an alky seems more socially acceptable.
 
My point was where should retired blokes 20% go? There's some who would say PTSD well if you can't take it shouldn't have joined. We live in a big society and pay enough tax where there should be treatment avenues for all ,yes originally it was their choice to try a drug but it's like alcoholism some can take it and leave it and other need more but somehow being an alky seems more socially acceptable.

Because more people drink. The occasional wine, or the "when I was younger" effect inspires the "there but for the grace of God, go I" feeling in a way other drugs don't.
 
Because more people drink. The occasional wine, or the "when I was younger" effect inspires the "there but for the grace of God, go I" feeling in a way other drugs don't.
I think it's a bit of a generational thing as well. Drug culture like weed has evolved since the arrival of extasy and coke is everywhere. I've been at parties and seen people I'd never associate with it doing a line and saying "oh I only do it at weekends".
 
I was genuinely shocked at how many if my civvy mates who routinely do cocaine, who have mental health issues. All with good jobs, good families
 

Awol

LE
Tramadol. Although, not handed out like smarties like it used to be, is what one doctor described to me as a dirty drug"
My mum was prescribed some after a partial amputation of her foot..
I did my back in after a fall, and took two.
Not reccomended if you like me have a nasty feeling after taking Opiates.
After the initial nausea had worn off i just got the feeling that no matter what happened i could not give a flying ****.
I have spoken to lots of poeple with the same affliction and it seems that that is the main attraction.
Twenty years ago I broke a small bone. Like a brave boy I went along to the hospital a little later and, despite the screams of nearby patients, I let the surgeons do their worst. I even insisted on staying awake for the whole ‘slice the skin, spread it open, “Black and Decker please nurse” and the sewing the awful mess back up afterwards’ bit, because, as I explained to the the surgeon afterwards “I can’t fight for my life if I’m asleep”.

So, an hour or so after the op, I’m at the hospital pharmacy and the bod behind behind the counter hands me a bag.... It was Tramadol... ‘take four a day, for thirty days’.

Fine I think, and did as instructed. I felt incredible for thirty days, and was really, really, happy. Then one afternoon I ran out and went from absolutely no understanding of addiction (and being quite dismissive of addiction and addicts in general to be honest) to being willing to literally kill myself within hours if I didn’t get any more Tramadol soon, very, very, very soon.

That night will live with me for hours. Every minute felt like an hour, my guts felt like they were being agonisingly scrunched up in something the size of a pea, my skin was crawling and I was panting. There was more, but I don’t have the words to describe it.

At the earliest possible time, when cockerels were still fast asleep and happily dreaming of compliant hens, my wife was on the phone to a doctor and somehow arranged for an emergency prescription.

By 10 am I had thankfully taken some Tramadol and was sleeping happily, and the following day, after seeing my GP, I was on a tapering reduction of the stuff, the taper lasting a whole six months.

My GP later said (and although he didn’t actually use the words ‘f*****g idiot’, the meaning was abundantly clear), “you should have given a week’s worth, not a month’s worth”.

A few years ago, my dear old 80 year old Mum had a mishap. She was on Tramadol for a couple of days but they made her sick so she stopped taking them. She then suffered absolutely horrendous withdrawal symptoms for two weeks afterwards. She was in bits, which I fully sympathise with.

They say that Tramadol, being an artificial opioid, is harmless, but, believe me, it isn’t.

I’ve researched it since, and I’ve seen more than one account where addicts who have been on both Tramadol and Heroin have said that Tramadol was by far the worst.

Stay well away from it, it’s a truly evil thing.
 
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enpointe

Old-Salt
Twenty years ago I broke a small bone. Like a brave boy I went along to the hospital a little later and, despite the screams of nearby patients, I let the surgeons do their worst. I even insisted on staying awake for the whole ‘slice the skin, spread it open, “Black and Decker please nurse” and the sewing the awful mess back up afterwards’ bit, because, as I explained to the the surgeon afterwards “I can’t fight for my life if I’m asleep”.

So, an hour or so after the op, I’m at the hospital pharmacy and the bod behind behind the counter hands me a bag.... It was tramadol... ‘take four a day, for thirty days’.

Fine I think, and did as instructed. I felt incredible for thirty days, and was really, really, happy. Then one afternoon I ran out and went from absolutely no understanding of addiction (and being quite dismissive of addiction and addicts in general to be honest) to being willing to literally kill myself within hours if I didn’t get any more Tramadol soon, very, very, very soon.

That night will live with me for hours. Every minute felt like an hour, my guts felt like they were being agonisingly scrunched up in something the size of a pea, my skin was crawling and I was panting. There was more, but I don’t have the words to describe it.

At the earliest possible time, when cockerels were still fast asleep and happily dreaming of compliant hens, my wife was on the phone to a doctor and somehow arranged for an emergency prescription.

By 10 am I had thankfully taken some Tramadol and was sleeping happily, and the following day, after seeing my GP, I was on a tapering reduction of the stuff, the taper lasting a whole six months.

My GP later said (and although he didn’t actually use the words ‘f*****g idiot’, the meaning was abundantly clear), “you should have given a week’s worth, not a month’s worth”.

A few years ago, my dear old 80 year old Mum had a mishap. She was on Tramadol for a couple of days but they made her sick so she stopped taking them. She then suffered absolutely horrendous withdrawal symptoms for two weeks afterwards. She was in bits, which I fully sympathise with.

They say that Tramadol, being an artificial opioid, is harmless, but, believe me, it isn’t.

I’ve researched it since, and I’ve seen more than one account where addicts who have been on both experienced both Tramadol and Heroin addiction have said that Tramadol was by far the worst.

Stay well away from it, it’s a truly evil thing.
tramadol is and addictive emetic with opiate like side effects , including for some people pain relief

it's utter utter crap
 

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