Dead pool 2021

Was not him though?
The Japanese started churning them out in the early to mid 70's.
Could be Sir Clive made them "affordable" & importantly "pocket sized" I think. Huge leap forward.
I recall my boss going totally ape at his son ( a director as well) for blowing what was to me around 8 or 9 times my take home wage to buy a Sanyo / Sony / Sharp maybe...long time ago now. I think it doubled as a cash register you could link to a till roll.
That was the era of the 1st so called "credit card"...the Access...when shops had to call Access Central to pass the purchases.
I think...calcs were a known quantity under development in the USA in the late 60s.
The first “electronic calculator” I saw was about the size of an electric type writer - would have been around ‘71.

One of the guys in the office came up with a calculation that he would put in as we went to lunch and it would still be churning away when we got back from the pub an hour later.
 
Old COBOL Programmer Walt.

We had to write efficient code because our mainframes had less than a gigabyte of memory. Yet our code ran factories, banks, payrolls, stock control and put man onto the moon in 1969.

'Early software guys' on Sinclair Spectrums. Pah!

;-)

In 1987 I went on a visit to one of the last operating RAF Bloodhound SAM sites. In the ops room/fire control office there was a ballistic computer which took the details of the target altitude, course, speed etc and worked out the optimum firing solution. The operator proudly explained that it had something like 16K of memory (about the same amount as the computer on the first Lunar Lander) and could give the missile a firing solution inside 30 seconds.

The ballistic computer was about the same size as a typical chest freezer but painted a dark green...

bz400_1_.png
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
The first “electronic calculator” I saw was about the size of an electric type writer - would have been around ‘71.

One of the guys in the office came up with a calculation that he would put in as we went to lunch and it would still be churning away when we got back from the pub an hour later.
Regular reports from our computer operators in the mid 1970s that they would load a deck of punched cards (or a program, as we coders called it) onto a reader then clear off to the pub for a couple of hours while it ran.

Which went well until a card fell off the reader...
 

ColdWarWorrier

Old-Salt

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
I'll put a cheeky fiver on Elton:

Probably because the tickets weren’t selling.
The Mrs loves him, I admit to liking his early 1970’s stuff with Bernie as his writer but he’s gone a bit to far for my tastes now.
So I popped onto the ticket site and then quickly popped off.
Extortionate isn’t the word.
 
Regular reports from our computer operators in the mid 1970s that they would load a deck of punched cards (or a program, as we coders called it) onto a reader then clear off to the pub for a couple of hours while it ran.

Which went well until a card fell off the reader...
Ah, those were the days. Pub at lunchtime, and enhanced by the pub taking Luncheon Vouchers for beer!
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
Was not him though?
The Japanese started churning them out in the early to mid 70's.
Could be Sir Clive made them "affordable" & importantly "pocket sized" I think. Huge leap forward.
I recall my boss going totally ape at his son ( a director as well) for blowing what was to me around 8 or 9 times my take home wage to buy a Sanyo / Sony / Sharp maybe...long time ago now. I think it doubled as a cash register you could link to a till roll.
That was the era of the 1st so called "credit card"...the Access...when shops had to call Access Central to pass the purchases.
I think...calcs were a known quantity under development in the USA in the late 60s.
In 1966-7 my father had a calculator size mechanical calculator in South America. Stick a sort of crochet hook in a hole and push it up. Repeat for tens, hundreds, thousands etc.

At some point father in law had something similar (found when we cleared his house, 2013) the shape and size of a Coke tin.
 
In 1966-7 my father had a calculator size mechanical calculator in South America. Stick a sort of crochet hook in a hole and push it up. Repeat for tens, hundreds, thousands etc.

At some point father in law had something similar (found when we cleared his house, 2013) the shape and size of a Coke tin.

There's posh: keeping your recreational drugs in a separate tin.
 
My father bought (or rather his company bought for him) a scientific calculator, in about 74.
With those little red lights as a display.
Sixty Three quid.
In context - in 1975, he sold his Mk 1 Cortina Estate, with radio, for sixty quid.
My first one was exactly that (also 1975) , and my dad was robbed, it was £69 !!!
mark you that was chicken feed in comparison to the first video recorder he bought to record our horse in the 1978 g National. £850 , the size of a big suitcase, and the longest tapes ( huge double stacked things) were an hour and a half.
sir clives contribuiion to the world of simple and cheap electronics was desperately needed.
 
My father bought (or rather his company bought for him) a scientific calculator, in about 74.
With those little red lights as a display.
Sixty Three quid.
In context - in 1975, he sold his Mk 1 Cortina Estate, with radio, for sixty quid.

Typically, they were giving away LCD calculators in petrol stations and the like as promotional gifts within a few years.
 
My first one was exactly that (also 1975) , and my dad was robbed, it was £69 !!!
mark you that was chicken feed in comparison to the first video recorder he bought to record our horse in the 1978 g National. £850 , the size of a big suitcase, and the longest tapes ( huge double stacked things) were an hour and a half.
sir clives contribuiion to the world of simple and cheap electronics was desperately needed.
aaaqh, the Grundig/philips system, which was better than VHS and Beta, but never marketted properly.
 
Old COBOL Programmer Walt.

We had to write efficient code because our mainframes had less than a gigabyte of memory. Yet our code ran factories, banks, payrolls, stock control and put man onto the moon in 1969.

'Early software guys' on Sinclair Spectrums. Pah!

;-)
Any geeks want to play at Moonlandings?
The source code for the Apollo Guidance Computer is at:
 

O Zangado

War Hero
In 1987 I went on a visit to one of the last operating RAF Bloodhound SAM sites. In the ops room/fire control office there was a ballistic computer which took the details of the target altitude, course, speed etc and worked out the optimum firing solution. The operator proudly explained that it had something like 16K of memory (about the same amount as the computer on the first Lunar Lander) and could give the missile a firing solution inside 30 seconds.

The ballistic computer was about the same size as a typical chest freezer but painted a dark green...

bz400_1_.png

OK, I'll take the bait.

Chest freezer, my arrse. If it's that shape and painted dark green, it's a tank.

OZ
 

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