Builds Dawning of the Wokka Wokka - Simmerits epic build of the 1/35 Trumpter Chinook.............

I'm struggling to print them really thin. Would it work if they were about 1.5mm thick and thinned with wet and dry to your desired size? They would need some finishing anyway as the finish from the printer isn't completely smooth.
 
I'm struggling to print them really thin. Would it work if they were about 1.5mm thick and thinned with wet and dry to your desired size? They would need some finishing anyway as the finish from the printer isn't completely smooth.
yep lets give that a go
 
Just an idea for a diarama when you've finished the Wokka.

One of 28 Sqn's Chinooks had to make an emergency landing in a field a couple of days ago. Here's some fine detail of what would make the diarama historically accurate.

View attachment 537558

The regs say the aircraft must be chocked when the engines are shut down.
Them moles are buggers you know!
 
Has the wokka gone back on the shelf yet?

no. Comes out to play tomorrow. two days on the Wokka thrn two days on the Mat is how aim going to do it.

tomorrow is the start of filling in the rivets. Far sands of em.... well. Quite a few anyway
 
The limitations of my model making would have been to effectively create a decal of the offending item (filter pattern) and transfer it onto the model...
Hats off to you.
Big day tomorrow. It’s on the bench
 
Fair play
If the 3D printer doesn’t come off couldn’t you use a very thin piece of aluminium (or foil), negative press against the raised part supplied and pin it through?

I have a plan. All will be revealed
 
My plan is to buy a second-hand real Chinook via crowd funding and just deliver it to his doorstep.
 
It's going ... badly!

The printer has a heated bed onto which the plastic filament is extruded to make the object. The bed moves in the Y axis and the printer head in X and Z. In order for this to work, the object has to adhere slightly to the printer bed. That's the killer because these are thin, narrow sided pieces and are just breaking when I remove them from the bed, I have 1 success out of about 40 printed!

Still, on that basis I just need to print about another 200...

The bonus is that they cost next to nothing to print, the downside is I can only print when I am not working as the bloody printer is quite noisy.
 

Verwaltung

Clanker
It's going ... badly!

The printer has a heated bed onto which the plastic filament is extruded to make the object. The bed moves in the Y axis and the printer head in X and Z. In order for this to work, the object has to adhere slightly to the printer bed. That's the killer because these are thin, narrow sided pieces and are just breaking when I remove them from the bed, I have 1 success out of about 40 printed!

Still, on that basis I just need to print about another 200...

The bonus is that they cost next to nothing to print, the downside is I can only print when I am not working as the bloody printer is quite noisy.

I've found that with my Ender 3 v2, letting the bed cool down to room temperature before trying to remove thin parts helps a great deal, as does using a double edged traditional razor blade CAREFULLY eased between the part and the glass of the bed....
 
Thanks, I always let it cool but not tried a razor blade. I will do though as I have been using my usual thin but sharp scraper, it's nowhere near as thin as a razor blade though so that might be all I need to do!
 

Verwaltung

Clanker
Thanks, I always let it cool but not tried a razor blade. I will do though as I have been using my usual thin but sharp scraper, it's nowhere near as thin as a razor blade though so that might be all I need to do!
Hopefully so. I usually hold the blade from the sides using both hands, and flex the middle of the blade down flush with the glass - and approach a corner of the object gently. This method does need care, obviously.

Remember if you slice your fingers it's not my fault . I've printed detailed parts down to about 400 microns thick this way.

Do make sure the bed is properly cool though, if it still has any warmth to it it's easy to warp the parts, at least with PLA. I've not yet tried any different materials.
 
Right. For those sceptics out there. It’s off. After about a 3 year break, it’s official. I’ve restarted.

So. Where to start. Rivets. Farsands of em.

91C03FAA-492B-405D-955A-9C0DA08E090B.jpeg

The Wokka has scribed panel lines which are OK. I did look at the accuracy of them many years ago but can’t really be bothered to re check. If I was going to rescribe them, it should have been done years ago.

What Trumpeter do and many other manufacturers is have small holes in the casting to represent rivets, which is wrong as we all know rivets are either flat or protrude. In the case of Wokkas, they protrude. I have basically got to fill them all in. Every last one of em........ my level of insanity knows no depth.......

what I am using is this stuff. It’s fab.

5FDA1569-63B6-47E9-9A1A-4213452C63E1.jpeg


As the name suggests, it’s waterfill putty. You clean off the excess with alcohol when it’s dry.

When applied it looks like this.

A5BA48B4-44AA-494A-A6FE-DB4F30CA7887.jpeg


and a completed panel looks like this

64F3A401-9AC7-46E2-90C0-51C752E57D94.jpeg


I’m only intending to do one panel tonight before cleaning it off. I’ll have to nip to the chemists tomorrow to pick up a bottle of alcohol. What should be left when I clean it off is a very neat set of white circles where the filled rivets are. Once I’ve confirmed it works OK, there is probably about a weeks work to fill it and clean off the excess.

right. Next job.

010BBBF1-903B-4B35-B7D5-74AA33D34036.jpeg


The only remaining rotors. The mrs’ fuckwit son kicked a ball at the Wokka when it was residing on her piano and smashed a set. He then tried to hide them. He is a w@nker of the first order who would now be dead if he’d smashed my heli.

Now these rotors would be fine if this Wokka was 40 years old, but it’s not. Carbon now aren’t they, which means they do not sag. That means these rotors need straightening.

FF11ADC2-FE30-4C6B-9C0B-A7BFAB25444B.jpeg

Now this is a second Wokka. It was going to be a Mert in Afghan, but now it’s a donor kit for my Wokka as I need to nick the rotors.

What I plan to do is experiment with straightening the set I constructed. How I aim to do that is to steep it in very hot tap water to soften it then put a 5kg weight on top of it while it cools overnight. If I’m lucky, it will straighten out. I can then debate the construction of two new sets of rotors for it. I will explain why later.

Excited? Wait til it’s finished in about May.

next job in ten after I’ve heated a blade.
 
Last edited:
What Trumpeter do and many other manufacturers is have small holes in the casting to represent rivets, which is wrong as we all know rivets are either flat or protrude. In the case of Wokkas, they protrude. I have basically got to fill them all in. Every last one of em........ my level of insanity knows no depth.......

...are still at the shallow end?

Just curious... ;-)
 
Top