Dauphin Crash

Discussion in 'Aviation' started by Mighty_doh_nut, Apr 3, 2005.

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  1. Not a recent event by the way. Last year?

    Strangely enough it was a demonstration on the S&R facilities in front of all the press, hence the 'good' footage. (better than the copy I made from Sky News)

    The dope on rope had a lucky escape if you watch him closely as the blades stoof in.

    Fly safe,

  2. That website has some lovely films on it. I feel quite sick now 8O
  3. That is definitely not recent. We were shown that vid during "Dunker" training in 2001.
    That said, it still has not lost it's power to make me never want to set foot in another helo... 8O
  4. I saw a thingy on this.....

    This is actually the result of a single engine failure (which is more obvious if you saw the bit just before when it was hovering normally)......

    They're descending while the other engine's taking up the load to maintain rotor speed, which it manages just as they touch the water, sufficiently recovering Nr to then get some lift going again.

    May well have got away with it if the fennistrom hadn't have disentigrated on contact with the water (you can see the blades disentigrate as they pick up a load of water as the tail lifts out again) which is why he then ended up with, in effect, a tail rotor failure as well......hence the resultant spin.

    Scary stuff.......
  5. http://www.taiwanheadlines.gov.tw/20000907/20000907s2.html

    Rescue chopper crashes during drill

    Published: September 7, 2000
    Source: Taipei Times

    The downed helicopter is pulled from Tainan County's Tsengwen Creek.
    helicopter belonging to the National Police Administration's air squadron crashed into a river during a rescue drill in Tainan County yesterday, leaving the copilot in a coma and five others injured.

    Officials said engine failure might have caused the French-made Dauphin 365N2 helicopter to plunge into the river.

    The accident occurred at around 11:30am, when the airborne squadron joined the Tainan County Government's fire department in a rescue exercise around a sandbank in Tsengwen Creek.

    [​IMG]The downed helicopter is pulled from Tainan County's Tsengwen Creek.

    The helicopter was lowering a policeman over the river when the helicopter tilted and briefly dropped into the water. When the chopper took off again, it began to spin out of control about 10 meters above the river.

    Seconds later, the aircraft plunged into the water. As the chopper rolled onto its side, the massive rotor blades dug into the water and splintered into fragments.

    Co-pilot Lin Jung-ta has been in a coma since the crash. The other five, pilot Wang Chi-chiang, chief mechanic Hsieh Hsi-ming, police officer Kuan Cheng-kuo as well as firefighters Chiu Chi-fang and Tseng Kuo-shun were taken to hospital suffering from cuts and bruises and were in stable condition, doctors said.

    The National Police Administration has set up a task force to look into the causes of the accident.

    According to the pilot, the chopper lost power shortly before the crash, likely because of an engine malfunction.

    Data from the police administration showed that the helicopter was purchased in May 1993 and had accumulated 2,420 hours of flying time.

    The exercise was intended to be a simulation of the Pachang Creek incident that occurred in Chiayi County on July 22, in which four construction workers were stranded on a sandbank in the middle of the creek after a sudden rise of river water. The workers were washed away in front of TV cameras after the rescue effort was delayed, triggering a wave of criticism against the government.

    Premier Tang Fei yesterday said the helicopter crash highlighted Taiwan's need to improve its rescue operations.

    "Today's accident shows that we need to improve our equipment and training in all aspects," Tang said.

    Tang said though accidents were inevitable in drills, measures should be taken to minimize the possibility of mishaps.

    The government has been eager to show improvements in its emergency services since July's bungled river rescue, but some training courses have had embarrassing results.

    Last month, rescue workers tested pistols designed to launch flares and ropes into the air, but none of them worked.

    In another exercise covered live on television, a cameraman was thrown into a river when two police dinghy boats collided.