Danish Military Kills Four Pirates in Battle in Gulf of Guinea

As I said the other say on another thread, when a boatload of 'fugees pulled alongside us they were kept in their RHIB until Tunisian CG rocked up to collect them. Our old man was well aware, and indeed had been briefed against it through the company from a governmental level, that if they touched the deck of our Dutch-flagged bucket then they'd be able to claim asylum in Holland.
Boatload of refugees.
Not armed pirates who had just fired at your bucket.
 

Yokel

LE
The Danes are not the only ones there - Royal Navy joins international fight against piracy along vital trade route

HMS Trent is in the Gulf of Guinea – one of the world’s piracy hotspots – as the UK looks to improve security and help prevent widespread piracy which has seen international shipping suffer, seafarers’ lives put in danger and damage caused to the economies of nearby nations.

The patrol ship has visited Nigeria, Ghana and Senegal to foster ties and train local forces, equipping them in the fight against illegal activity, and spoken to local fishermen to understand patterns of life during security operations in the Niger Delta.

HMS Trent carries a specialist team of Royal Marines from 42 Commando who are experts in boarding operations, known officially as Maritime Interdiction Operations. The commandos have been sharing knowledge and expertise in the skills needed to board, search and – if needs be – seize suspect vessels.

Trent’s mission also included French-led multinational exercises, known as Grand African Nemo, during which the ship worked closely with the Togolese, Nigerian and Benin Navies, while also operating with the Italian frigate Marceglia as part of international efforts.

The deployment of the patrol vessel is a clear signal of the UK’s commitment to the region.
 

NSP

LE
May I suggest such traditional methods as making them 'walk the plank,' or 'hanging them from the yard arm.'
Sadly not allowed. I know plenty of captains that would like to be robust but just know that somewhere onboard is some wokeist recently-graduated right-on type that hasn't been reduced to a gibbering "I want an office-based position" wreck by us more worldly-wise and forthright types yet. With a camera...
 
They might want to check on those Danes.

"Hey Vikings! Been up to owt?"

"...we've been, eh, vik-ing a bit"

"and?"

"saw some guys vik-ing"

"...do tell"

"vik'd them"
 

philc

LE
Any legal or factual basis for that claim? Are you perhaps under the impression that Denmark has no legitimate national interest in piracy in those waters, or experience dealing with maritime piracy?

Examples of the asylum & piracy issue, it is a problem and a real threat to those capturing pirates.





Rights of those captured.

 
Examples of the asylum & piracy issue, it is a problem and a real threat to those capturing pirates.





Rights of those captured.

Don’t capture them then . Leave them free to roam the seas. As the Russians allegedly did.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
Don't know if it was ever verified, but the story goes the Russian Navy caught a group of Somali pirates back in 2010. They dumped them in a dinghy miles out to sea, without water or navigation equipment. Job jobbed, back home for vodka and medals. ;)
More than that. There was a video kicking around a few years ago of a boat that was boarded. The occupants were cuffed, the boat filled with explosives and the Russians then stood off and blew it up. The whole thing was filmed and stuck on the internet in a ‘this is what we’ll do to you if you try to rob us’ style.

Attacks on Russian-flagged vessels declined very sharply.
 
Sure.
Lead is sooo "yesterday".
old-rare-twocavity-mold-cast-260nw-1715536543.jpg


solid_brass_regular_shipping-500x667.jpg


Maybe even a lovely alloy.
Sexy wee minxes.
Pretty eh?
article-2547765-1B0A6A3300000578-163_306x423.jpg
 
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A.P. Moller himself was a hero to the older generation in Denmark, during the occupation he spent his own and company money in buying large quantities of arms from Sweden for the fledgling resistance movement.
There were quite a lot of consequences for him if it all went Pete Tong, luckily it didn't.
 
Sadly not allowed. I know plenty of captains that would like to be robust but just know that somewhere onboard is some wokeist recently-graduated right-on type that hasn't been reduced to a gibbering "I want an office-based position" wreck by us more worldly-wise and forthright types yet. With a camera...
Leaving aside your equation of reporting murder with being "wokeist", that is indeed part of the problem, i.e. even if we wanted to, we have no guarantee of getting away with offing surrendered or incapacitated pirates, and therefore we either abandon those waters to the pirates (re-routeing not being an option in this case), or we think through in advance how to handle such issues and what to do with detained suspects.

The complexities are well known and well documented and have been for years. How this latest incident plays out remains to be seen. All I disagree with is the easy assumption that the Danes must have got it wrong and have blundered naively into the situation without any previous experience. They have plenty previous experience from operations on the other side of the continent, and were handing over suspects to a regional nation as long ago as 2013.
 
More than that. There was a video kicking around a few years ago of a boat that was boarded. The occupants were cuffed, the boat filled with explosives and the Russians then stood off and blew it up. The whole thing was filmed and stuck on the internet in a ‘this is what we’ll do to you if you try to rob us’ style.

Attacks on Russian-flagged vessels declined very sharply.

Ivan has very little sense of humour when it comes to people doing bad things to his citizens. Back in the '80's, an Islamic terror group kidnapped three Russians from the local embassy. They killed one to show they meant business. The KGB response was to snatch the brother of the groups leader. He was tortured, killed and the remains sent to the terrorists with a note attached to what was left of the poor bugger,

"Release our people. Or this is just the beginning".

Within 24 hours, the two Russian hostages were released unharmed.
 

NSP

LE
Leaving aside your equation of reporting murder with being "wokeist", that is indeed part of the problem, i.e. even if we wanted to, we have no guarantee of getting away with offing surrendered or incapacitated pirates, and therefore we either abandon those waters to the pirates (re-routeing not being an option in this case), or we think through in advance how to handle such issues and what to do with detained suspects.

The complexities are well known and well documented and have been for years. How this latest incident plays out remains to be seen. All I disagree with is the easy assumption that the Danes must have got it wrong and have blundered naively into the situation without any previous experience. They have plenty previous experience from operations on the other side of the continent, and were handing over suspects to a regional nation as long ago as 2013.
Have you ever actually been to sea?

Not in a navy, where you're all tooled up and able to shoot back, but on a civvy ship in a pirate area, where international law expressly forbids you from having any means of defending yourself beyond fire hoses and the axes from the fire-fighting kit?
 
Have you ever actually been to sea?

Not in a navy, where you're all tooled up and able to shoot back, but on a civvy ship in a pirate area, where international law expressly forbids you from having any means of defending yourself beyond fire hoses and the axes from the fire-fighting kit?
What were those Maritine security teams doing all tooled up on civilian ships in pirate areas then?

 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
Ivan has very little sense of humour when it comes to people doing bad things to his citizens. Back in the '80's, an Islamic terror group kidnapped three Russians from the local embassy. They killed one to show they meant business. The KGB response was to snatch the brother of the groups leader. He was tortured, killed and the remains sent to the terrorists with a note attached to what was left of the poor bugger,

"Release our people. Or this is just the beginning".

Within 24 hours, the two Russian hostages were released unharmed.
Close. Try Beirut and the son of the chief of the terror group, whose head was returned to his father in a box.
 

ches

LE
Have you ever actually been to sea?

Not in a navy, where you're all tooled up and able to shoot back, but on a civvy ship in a pirate area, where international law expressly forbids you from having any means of defending yourself beyond fire hoses and the axes from the fire-fighting kit?

Not that accurate I'm afraid. The CP side of maritime security went big time in the late 00s/early 2010- with all the hullaballoo with the Somali lot & contracts were being thrown about willy nilly subsequently being gobbled up by loads of cabbagehead types. So much so that us pongo types trying to get onto a contract with a home counties ex-army run outfit couldn't get a look on on the Madagascar - Yemen - Oman/Gulf route (the greedy bastards).

ROE were pretty robust in international waters when the armed teams were on board. Even one of those slow timber wee fishing boats coming within 200-300m of a ship was going to get brassed up if they ignored the many warning shots.

Those shipping organisations that weren't placing armed protection onboard were taking a risk & restricting their own trade, the underwriters of the more lucrative cargoes weren't allowing their gear onto ships that weren't going out with details on board.
 
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NSP

LE
What were those Maritine security teams doing all tooled up on civilian ships in pirate areas then?

Wouldn't know - seems to be the big boys only. People need bunk space and it's at a premium on many vessels, especially ones that don't move stuff from A to B and have many more specialist personnel along for the ride. I've been on jobs where various teams are diffy a body simply because there isn't the space for them.

People assume that because a massive container ship can accommodate a security team as well as the regular marine crew and the operator can afford them then it's a panacea for everything afloat. It's not.
 

ches

LE
Wouldn't know - seems to be the big boys only. People need bunk space and it's at a premium on many vessels, especially ones that don't move stuff from A to B and have many more specialist personnel along for the ride. I've been on jobs where various teams are diffy a body simply because there isn't the space for them.

People assume that because a massive container ship can accommodate a security team as well as the regular marine crew and the operator can afford them then it's a panacea for everything afloat. It's not.

Very valid points. IIRC the larger cargo vessels were/are still taking paying passengers along certain routes. (there is/was a fairly robust tourist types using some popular transit routes - the ships larger offering very reasonable prices.

Scaling ship sizes down I'd imagine smaller operators wouldn't be able to afford sec details.

As an aside, following the Captain Philips lark, there was some info going about that he (or higher ups at MAERSK) had made a conscious decision to ignore the warnings of the international military in the region on upscaling of piracy attacks in the area. Their route wasn't altered apparently.
 

endure

GCM
Very valid points. IIRC the larger cargo vessels were/are still taking paying passengers along certain routes. (there is/was a fairly robust tourist types using some popular transit routes - the ships larger offering very reasonable prices.
Cargo ships that carry passengers carry a maximum of 12. Any more and they have to cary a full time doctor.
 

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