Dandelions - wet the bed

TheAssassin

War Hero
As a child have known this plant to be known colloquially as wet the bed. Found out today it's from the French term pis-en-lis, (the French do not call the plant dandelions even though it's an anglicised version of the French description of the plant dent-de-lion).

The term wet the bed came from an alcoholic beverage the French make with the leaves, which if drunk beyond moderation carries the risk of a sodden mattress.

Has anyone come across this liqueur ?
 
As a child have known this plant to be known colloquially as wet the bed. Found out today it's from the French term pis-en-lis, (the French do not call the plant dandelions even though it's an anglicised version of the French description of the plant dent-de-lion).

The term wet the bed came from an alcoholic beverage the French make with the leaves, which if drunk beyond moderation carries the risk of a sodden mattress.

Has anyone come across this liqueur ?
Nope, but the wine tastes like perming lotion.
 
How do you know what perming lotion tastes like? Or is that a daft question?
 
Don’t know about French booze makers, but Brasserie Fantome in Belgium makes some beers with a ‘pissenlit’ appelation. May not be the same, though.
 
the French do not call the plant dandelions even though it's an anglicised version of the French description of the plant dent-de-lion.
They do
Its just that being frogs they have to complicate it - so its a pis en lit until it gets to the fluffy white seeding stage** - then its a dent de lion


**Stand fast Mrs L who is convinced the white fluffy seeding stage happens before the pretty yellow attractive to bees so come fertilise me flower stage.
 
They do
Its just that being frogs they have to complicate it - so its a pis en lit until it gets to the fluffy white seeding stage** - then its a dent de lion


**Stand fast Mrs L who is convinced the white fluffy seeding stage happens before the pretty yellow attractive to bees so come fertilise me flower stage.
Actually it's bright yellow, then fades to the fluffy ball that gets blown away by the wind to plant new dandelion seeds elsewhere
 
Actually it's bright yellow, then fades to the fluffy ball that gets blown away by the wind to plant new dandelion seeds elsewhere
Which is why they need to be dealt with when yellow, just the same as thistles.Once the seeds get airborne they can soon cover several acres.
 
This all very interesting and kind of spooky, because when we were kids it was said that if you got the juice / sap or whatever of a dandelion on your hands, then that night you'd wet the bed.

Truth v reality, mixed metaphors or what?
 
This all very interesting and kind of spooky, because when we were kids it was said that if you got the juice / sap or whatever of a dandelion on your hands, then that night you'd wet the bed.

Truth v reality, mixed metaphors or what?
I never knew why they were called wet the beds until today
 
Quite traditional in some parts (of France) to use the petals in a salad mix, I often see ladies of a certain age with a wicker basket collecting them in the forest, or at the side of the road in summer/autumn.
The old dears round here say that it smells like piss so that is where the name comes from.
(They may be winding up a retired old Rosbif)
As for drinking any plant product*, the only plants I can think of used in booze is gentiane, an old mediaeval medicament that is pressed and sold commercially as 'Suze'.
Slightly bitter but a nice digestive on a full stomach after a good meal.


There is also a similar digestive from similar plants and some herbs (trade secret) called 'Gauloise'


These are the only ones I have tried, there will be loads of other variations within France (and elsewhere).
Tradition is still respected in some places.













* Apart from the Mirabelle plums from my garden where I collect them every year, ferment them and then take them to the travelling distiller every January.
 
Dandelions are 100% edible. The Victorians used the leaves and flowers in salads, the roots have a stomach calming effect for gut rot and the trots. You mash the roots and let them soak in water, or boil the mix up and then drink the resulting brew. The roots can also be preserved by drying, or roasting and then used to make a tea like drink - also with stomach calming properties.
 
Nazis to flowers in three threads. Arrsers are a weird lot.
 
The roots can also be preserved by drying, or roasting and then used to make a tea like drink
I've done this. If I recall correctly, its described in Eddie McGee's book "No Need to Die".

It's OK but no substitute for PG Tips.
 
I've done this. If I recall correctly, its described in Eddie McGee's book "No Need to Die".

It's OK but no substitute for PG Tips.
None of it ever is as good as what it is substituting for.
 

soleil

War Hero
I've had a little look around and discovered that it does exist as a liqueur, although there aren't as many producers as I would have expected. Something else which I could see on the French pages were lots of suggestions as to how you can make something similar at home.

It seems to be the case with some of the products that they are made from the dandelion flowers.

 

gorillaguts981

War Hero
Called piss-a-beds by the old folk in Lincolnshire. I read somewhere the Russians cultivated them for the latex sap as a supply of raw material for tyres in WWII. Also the leaves are edible by humans and you can roast the roots for ersatz coffee. As kids we blobbed the milky sap on a finger layer by layer until it built up into a decent thickness. You then rolled it off to make a small rubber band. Well we had no money and few toys. I lived near a butcher and amused myself by pulling the tendons on chickens feet to make the claws move. A pigs tail and a pair of pliers and I was happy for hours.
 

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