Dambusters Come Home after 2 whole months...

#1
Saw this on the Defence T'Interweb site:

Linky

Well done and all that but 2 months FFS?? Apparently their engineers had to work for up to 12 hours ata time!!! Perhaps I made the wrong choice of arm after all... :roll:
 
#2
Apparantly the hotel budget was used up. Awful conditions, some of the men were two to an air conditioned corimec.
 
#3
When I was in Basra a couple of years ago some 'visiting' RAF pilots decided they had to hop down to Al Udeid as the accomodation in the COB wasn't up to scratch for their 2 night stay.

I tactfully pointed out that it seemed acceptable to the several thousand Army bods who lived there for 6 months at a time.... :(
 
#4
If you'd tried harder at school you could of joined us instead of all the jealousy :wink:
Reality time, squadron lads will serve about 6 months of the year away from home on various deployments, tours, exercises, and trips.

Whilst back in the UK they will work 12 hour shifts day in, day out. The squadron will have manning for 24hrs a day. There are no early stacks on Friday's. Beer calls and socials rarely happen and when they do only half the sqdn can attend. Lunch breaks consist of 20 minutes grabbed where they can. And they have still have to do ceremonial duties, guard, working parties etc.

How many of you can honestly say you work those sort of hours when you're not on ops. I know I can't. Saying that it's Friday and i'm going home in a couple of hours. :twisted:
 
#5
jimnicebutdim said:
If you'd tried harder at school you could of joined us instead of all the jealousy :wink:
Reality time, squadron lads will serve about 6 months of the year away from home on various deployments, tours, exercises, and trips.

Whilst back in the UK they will work 12 hour shifts day in, day out. The squadron will have manning for 24hrs a day. There are no early stacks on Friday's. Beer calls and socials rarely happen and when they do only half the sqdn can attend. Lunch breaks consist of 20 minutes grabbed where they can. And they have still have to do ceremonial duties, guard, working parties etc.

How many of you can honestly say you work those sort of hours when you're not on ops. I know I can't. Saying that it's Friday and i'm going home in a couple of hours. :twisted:
Yep, I can. Those hours and more. Doesn't mean I'm a better person. Still means you're a crab git though.
 
#6
jimnicebutdim said:
If you'd tried harder at school you could of joined us instead of all the jealousy :wink:
Reality time, squadron lads will serve about 6 months of the year away from home on various deployments, tours, exercises, and trips.

Whilst back in the UK they will work 12 hour shifts day in, day out. The squadron will have manning for 24hrs a day. There are no early stacks on Friday's. Beer calls and socials rarely happen and when they do only half the sqdn can attend. Lunch breaks consist of 20 minutes grabbed where they can. And they have still have to do ceremonial duties, guard, working parties etc.

How many of you can honestly say you work those sort of hours when you're not on ops. I know I can't. Saying that it's Friday and i'm going home in a couple of hours. :twisted:
Yes it's true. If I'd been a speccy no mates geek at school I could have been a mincing, whining civvie in a nylon uniform crying every time I had to get off my shiny arrse to go and tighten a screw or something instead of spending all my time on Army websites trying to pass myself off as a military man.
 
#7
Tank transporters do. 5 Days a week away from camp working up to 20 hour days. Tours are worse. At least we did when I left 8 years ago.
 
#8
jimnicebutdim said:
If you'd tried harder at school you could of joined us instead of all the jealousy :wink:
Reality time, squadron lads will serve about 6 months of the year away from home on various deployments, tours, exercises, and trips.

Whilst back in the UK they will work 12 hour shifts day in, day out. The squadron will have manning for 24hrs a day. There are no early stacks on Friday's. Beer calls and socials rarely happen and when they do only half the sqdn can attend. Lunch breaks consist of 20 minutes grabbed where they can. And they have still have to do ceremonial duties, guard, working parties etc.

How many of you can honestly say you work those sort of hours when you're not on ops. I know I can't. Saying that it's Friday and i'm going home in a couple of hours. :twisted:
It took you a whole 11 minutes to bite?!?! :D

Away for 6 months of the year? Try doing Coy, Bn, Bde beat up training for 2-3 months followed by 1 month of PDT, a 6 month tour and then coming back to having to provide training support, attend courses etc before you go round the whole merry go round again. I'm afraid you won't find much sympathy here...

I happen to have a good degree from a good university so worked plenty hard enough thank you!
 
#9
I'm sure there was a similar thread about 2 months ago............. And again in another 2 months...........
 
#11
Crazy_Legs said:
box-of-frogs said:
I'm sure there was a similar thread about 2 months ago............. And again in another 2 months...........
And yet they keep on biting...! :D
I'll bite to that! :D I was merely pointing out that there was a thread on exactly this topic 2 months ago! And no doubt the boss of whoever took over from that lot will want an article saying 'how hard his blokes worked'. Then someone else will want to fire up the outrage plane over a 2 month tour only to find it's run out of fuel! :D
 
#13
box-of-frogs said:
Crazy_Legs said:
box-of-frogs said:
I'm sure there was a similar thread about 2 months ago............. And again in another 2 months...........
And yet they keep on biting...! :D
I'll bite to that! :D I was merely pointing out that there was a thread on exactly this topic 2 months ago! And no doubt the boss of whoever took over from that lot will want an article saying 'how hard his blokes worked'. Then someone else will want to fire up the outrage plane over a 2 month tour only to find it's run out of fuel! :D
Aaah, the irony was lost on me at this time of the morning. Must go for coffee....!
 
#14
jimnicebutdim said:
If you'd tried harder at school you could of joined us instead of all the jealousy :wink:
Reality time, squadron lads will serve about 6 months of the year away from home on various deployments, tours, exercises, and trips.

Whilst back in the UK they will work 12 hour shifts day in, day out. The squadron will have manning for 24hrs a day. There are no early stacks on Friday's. Beer calls and socials rarely happen and when they do only half the sqdn can attend. Lunch breaks consist of 20 minutes grabbed where they can. And they have still have to do ceremonial duties, guard, working parties etc.

How many of you can honestly say you work those sort of hours when you're not on ops. I know I can't. Saying that it's Friday and i'm going home in a couple of hours. :twisted:
Mate, you're leaving yourself WIDE open to abuse on this one. God job it's in C&A where sensibility prevails and not the NAAFI.
 
#16
Of course we do, we hate everybody regardless of race, creed and colour or political bias, when we don't have a common foe we while away the hours battling each other but woe betide any idiot, foreign or domestic that thinks they can have a pop if they aren't part of the team...stay behind the white line Mister!
 
#17
HMS Montrose returned home today.

From the RN site.

The jetty at HM Naval Base, Devonport, Plymouth, was packed with a Royal Marine Band and happy families cheering and waving hand made banners greeting the crew who have been away for seven months in 40-50C heat working in arduous and difficult conditions protecting the world’s oil and other shipping from illegal activity including drugs, arms and people smuggling and piracy.

The Commanding Officer, Commander Andy Hogben said: “It’s fantastic to come home to such a warm welcome. It is great to see so many families on the jetty. My ship’s company have been waiting for this moment for seven months and it more than makes up for the time away from them. I must say thank you to the families on behalf of the whole ship - without their emotional and practical support back home while we have been away in the Middle East this would have been a harder job than it already was.

“I am extremely proud of my ship’s company, they have worked really hard in harsh conditions. We had several successes out there and the major one was the biggest ever seizure of illegal drugs in the region. We intercepted a dhow and the whole ship and the Lynx helicopter crew worked together on this operation. The boarding party and search party worked for hours in cramped, very uncomfortable conditions in very hot temperatures searching the boat for the hashish. It only dawned on us later that drugs we were destroying were being taken off the streets of Britain. The real reward of pour efforts.”

Commander Hogben, from Portsmouth, sailed into Devonport today with two of his three children Sam and James who embarked with his father-in-law Gavin in Spain. The CO was greeted on the jetty by his wife Julie and son Joe, age six.
Commander Hogben said the ship also provided a reassuring presence working alongside the regional navies of the Gulf States to ensure maritime security in the region. The area was infamous for piracy and a merchant ship was holed by pirates armed with rocket propelled grenades while HMS Montrose was there.

HMS Montrose and fellow Plymouth warship HMS Chatham, Portsmouth-based HMS Edinburgh and the Royal Fleet Auxiliary ship Argus (with Sea King helicopters on board) were jointly involved in the successful anti-drug smuggling operations amounting to 23 tonnes seized due to Royal Naval interceptions over a five-month period earlier this year.


Later.....

Plymouth-based HMS Northumberland has temporarily taken over from HMS Montrose in the region. After well-deserved leave the crew will return and deliver the ship to Rosyth in November for upkeep maintenance. The ship has been on four deployments in four years.
 

diplomat

MIA
Book Reviewer
#19
At least they are not supporting Afghanistan - we're supposed to be protecting the dams there!
 

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