Damaged ankle ligaments & tendons

Discussion in 'Health and Fitness' started by Ratty22, Feb 3, 2008.

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  1. Arrsers have provided brilliant advice so far on all sorts of matters. So, away you go with this one.

    Situation: Torn / badly stretched ankle ligaments / tendons yesterday pm. (playing rugby, what else?). No broken bones. Selection (AOSB) early March.

    Advice needed: what specific exercises can I do (frequency / repetitions /) that will give me the best chance of recovery by end of Feb.
    Is swimming an option or a no go? (I'm not in a cast and the vets didn't even slap on the tubigrip. Any-one know from experience the pro's and con's of wobble-boards?

    All contributions gratefully received.

    One Hacked Off Rat
  2. see your doctor but if you've torn a ligament, you are NOT going to be fit end of Feb!
  3. I had tendon surgery whilst serving & made a full recovery very quickly. But it was under strict instruction of the old Physioterrorists/PTIs. A wobble board could do more damage than help. I think that you should see a Physio to discus things.

    Good luck at AOSB. If you have to delay it for a couple of months it is far better to do it 110% medically fit than fail as you are only 70% fit & struggle with some of the tasks.

    I know it's dissapointing.

    Your health is your wealth.
  4. You a) might be surprised how quickly it improves, and b) you might have an ongoing issue; ligaments (apparently) don't actually heal, it is just the surrounding muscles that compensate. You might also have knock-on issues if you aren't careful with achilles and knees, because a good ankle injury changes everything.

    Both my ankles are giving me gyp after never having any problem no matter what I did. The left I knackered running knee high on the spot during a beasting and I drifted backwards and touched the wall - totally bust the outer ligament, instantly on the ground, it swelled up like Nigella's boobies in 20 seconds. The right was knackered by walking 55 miles on broken ground with no build-up. I could run on the left the next day (despite the swelling) but the right, which didn't suffer an actual trauma, is still giving me hell.

    Look at footballers - they regularly knacker their ankles and limp off, but they are back in a few weeks. The problems are long-term. Go with your instincts. If something feels wrong it probably is - humans have been injuring their ankles and geting over it for a long time.