• ARRSE have partnered with Armadillo Merino to bring you an ARRSE exclusive, generous discount offer on their full price range.
    To keep you warm with the best of Merino gear, visit www.armadillomerino.co.uk and use the code: NEWARRSE40 at the checkout to get 40% off!
    This superb deal has been generously offered to us by Armadillo Merino and is valid until midnight on the the 28th of February.

Dads Army

#1
On BBC2 tonight It's a night of the chosen episodes of the shows creators.
Anyway,miss spike was asking why,even after nearly 40 years,it's still as funny now as it was in the 70's.
It was said tonight that the chap's who played Frazer & Mr Godfrew survived the Somme although Mr Godfrey was injured three times.
I suppose a lot of the cast fought in either or both wars & that,I think,adds a bit of realism.
Whatever the reason,it's still f*cking funny Personally I think it's far funnier than the sh*te we get today!
So chaps,why do you think it's so funny?
Thanks chaps,
Spike
 
#2
Good setting well acted with an ageless script, you can see the jokes coming a mile off but that is it's endearing feature to me, also it has an inocence of a bygone age that todays 24hour society just doesn't understand like halfday wednesday's and such.
 
#4
harmless, funny and good old family entertainment, shame you can't say that about most of the stuff on telly nowadays ( my god I'm sounding like such and old fart!!)

Edited to say: Impressive to think that it finshed a year before I was born!
 

Sixty

ADC
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#7
spike7451 said:
It was said tonight that the chap's who played Frazer & Mr Godfrew survived the Somme although Mr Godfrey was injured three times.
I suppose a lot of the cast fought in either or both wars & that,I think,adds a bit of realism.

Aye, John Laurie and Arnold Ridley both fought at the Somme. Arthur Lowe, Clive Dunn and John Le Mesurier all fought in the Army in the second World War.
 
#11
wompingwillow said:
4 years as a POW for Clive Dunn
Great actors, perfectly delivered lines and repect for them knowing that they had worn the t-shirt along the way.

Fave scene was with Capt. Mannering, white paint, black paint!

A couple of the actors were born in the late 1800s!
 
#14
Ridley first tried to enlist with the Somerset Light Infantry in 1914 as an 18-year-old.

He was initially rejected because he had a condition called hammer toe, but was successful the next year.

He suffered two relatively minor shrapnel injuries towards the beginning of his service.

However, it was his experiences at the Somme in 1916 that were to scar him for the rest of his life.

The details have been unearthed by the historian Richard van Emden, who has studied the actor's own unpublished autobiography, official documents relating to his regiment in the National Archive in Kew and newspaper reports of the battle.

Mr van Emden said: "Ridley actually went over the top on two occasions. The first attack, at Delville Wood, was a horrible experience but somehow he managed to come away unscathed. The second time he wasn't so lucky.
After reading that I'll never look at,well speechless.
RIP Sir.
Just shows that the backbone of Britian was men like him,sadly now a rarety in this day & age. :(


I love the film where Mannering is steering the steam tractor & crushed all the tents & kit.No matter how many times I see that film,I'm in stitches with laughter!
Good stuff from the Beeb. (When the licence fee was worth paying!!!!Unlike the sh1te we get today)
 

the_boy_syrup

LE
Book Reviewer
#15
spike7451 said:
Ridley first tried to enlist with the Somerset Light Infantry in 1914 as an 18-year-old.

He was initially rejected because he had a condition called hammer toe, but was successful the next year.

He suffered two relatively minor shrapnel injuries towards the beginning of his service.

However, it was his experiences at the Somme in 1916 that were to scar him for the rest of his life.

The details have been unearthed by the historian Richard van Emden, who has studied the actor's own unpublished autobiography, official documents relating to his regiment in the National Archive in Kew and newspaper reports of the battle.

Mr van Emden said: "Ridley actually went over the top on two occasions. The first attack, at Delville Wood, was a horrible experience but somehow he managed to come away unscathed. The second time he wasn't so lucky.
After reading that I'll never look at,well speechless.
RIP Sir.
Just shows that the backbone of Britian was men like him,sadly now a rarety in this day & age. :(


I love the film where Mannering is steering the steam tractor & crushed all the tents & kit.No matter how many times I see that film,I'm in stitches with laughter!
Good stuff from the Beeb. (When the licence fee was worth paying!!!!Unlike the sh1te we get today)
Agree with Spike
Men like that are rare these days and he joined up again in '39 for another go !!

Exellant programe and films I can watch over and over and still find something to laugh at

Theres a speacial on BBC1 but it with Jonathon Ross so that might spoil it

Still kills an hour until A Bridge to Far
 
#16
With Arnold Ridley is usually mentioned his 1920’s play ‘The Ghost Train’, and if you’ve seen it it’s mostly likely been in the form of the WWII film re-make with Arthur Askey, bringing in nazis. However, rarely mentioned seems to be that this was no money-spinner for Ridley as originally not being able to place the play and being skint, he sold all rights for a few bob (literally). Performances including the films earned him SFA.

Another Mainwaring/Godfrey gem, when Cheeseman the reporter is to be embedded with the platoon, Godfrey as Quartermaster, (because he used to work in Men’s Outfitting for the Army and Navy), is told to measure Cheeseman for a uniform. Godfrey tells Mainwaring the platoon only has one spare uniform, followed by Mainwaring’s classic line; ”Well measure him for that”.

Always felt that despite the great scripts, they might have been even better if the odd ad-lib was allowed. Apparently Croft/Perry insisted on per the script only - good job they never wrote for the Marx Brothers 8O :lol:

No.9
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
#17
The platoon marching along holding an iron gate horizontal between them, with Pike's head stuck through the railings - magic.

What could say more about the BBC than when the best programming week after week is old classic repeats. Roll on Basil and the rat.
 
#18
As a kid in the late 60's and very early 70's I remember sitting with my father and laughing like a tttwwwaaaat at the comedy, Really, watching those episodes Adolph had little to fear after Dunkirk BUTIF all Brits had the bulldog stiff upper lip like Mainwaring..............I wouldn't have wanted, as a NAZI para, to get beaten round the head with that lip.
Pike was a class act.........................."Uncle Arthur, tell him, tell him, it's not fair, it's my turn with the Tommy gun tonight, you said so, if you don't do something I'll tell my mum!!" Fecking priceless!!
Recently I threw out a shite load of vinyl discs but, one or two are left and one of them..................the original 45rpm theme to....Dad's Army!! Just couldn't do it!!! Watched the film on TV again yesterday.............."It's that damned bank clerk!!!!" Simply.................CLASS!!! 8) :roll:
 
#19
the_boy_syrup said:
spike7451 said:
Ridley first tried to enlist with the Somerset Light Infantry in 1914 as an 18-year-old.

He was initially rejected because he had a condition called hammer toe, but was successful the next year.

He suffered two relatively minor shrapnel injuries towards the beginning of his service.

However, it was his experiences at the Somme in 1916 that were to scar him for the rest of his life.

The details have been unearthed by the historian Richard van Emden, who has studied the actor's own unpublished autobiography, official documents relating to his regiment in the National Archive in Kew and newspaper reports of the battle.

Mr van Emden said: "Ridley actually went over the top on two occasions. The first attack, at Delville Wood, was a horrible experience but somehow he managed to come away unscathed. The second time he wasn't so lucky.
After reading that I'll never look at,well speechless.
RIP Sir.
Just shows that the backbone of Britian was men like him,sadly now a rarety in this day & age. :(


I love the film where Mannering is steering the steam tractor & crushed all the tents & kit.No matter how many times I see that film,I'm in stitches with laughter!
Good stuff from the Beeb. (When the licence fee was worth paying!!!!Unlike the sh1te we get today)
Agree with Spike
Men like that are rare these days and he joined up again in '39 for another go !!

Exellant programe and films I can watch over and over and still find something to laugh at

Theres a speacial on BBC1 but it with Jonathon Ross so that might spoil it Still kills an hour until A Bridge to Far
No, he did it justice. Other than some background rock music early on (WTF) it was a good show, over too soon though, 90 minutes would have been better, less rushed.
 

Latest Threads