Dad of a recruit... son may DAOR

Evening all
My son has been in basic training for a few months now and is considering leaving.
Firstly he was recruited into a stream (excuse my terminology) that he did not sign up for. One of the officers confirmed it was the Army's cock-up, but for some reason they cannot fix it. So he does not have the end goal that he originally chose.
Then, several weeks into training, he was injured for a few days. However his visit to a physio was repeatedly postponed by someone in authority, so instead of being signed off as fit, he ended up with a "sickness paper (?)" in spite of him confirming he was fit again. He was put on light duties and then moved from his current platoon - who pass out in a few weeks - to another where he has to train again for another 3 months before they pass out. He is understandably f@@@ed off with this situation (my words) and is now considering leaving.
I believe he has done fairly well in the training (even though the platoon are constantly told how shite they all are), so it will be a shame for him and the Army if he leaves because of procedural mistakes.
My question is, can he leave just after passing out or is he then automatically committed for 4 years? I'm encouraging him to complete the basic training (even though most of it will be a repeat) before deciding on leaving, but he's worried that once this DAOR window closes then that's it for 4 years.

Help / advice much appreciated.
 
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theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
Recruits do not get to decide they are fit, that's down to the medical staff (including physios and PTI's)

Movement to a rehab platoon is not done lightly and will be for your sons best interests in order to make him fit enough to continue with training. Sometimes recruits will be moved into rehab to help them become fit enough for discharge.

Recruits will be placed back into training as near as to the point they left (or an earlier point, never later) and as soon as possible.

There is a chance you have not been given entirely accurate information.
 
Evening all
My son has been in basic training for a few months now and is considering leaving.
Firstly he was recruited into a stream (excuse my terminology) that he did not sign up for. One of the officers confirmed it was the Army's cock-up, but for some reason they cannot fix it. So he has no goal that he wanted.
Then, several weeks into training, he was injured for a few days. However his visit to a physio was repeatedly postponed by someone in authority, so instead of being signed off as fit, he ended up with a "sickness paper (?)" in spite of him confirming he was fit again. He was put on light duties and then moved from his current platoon - who pass out in a few weeks - to another where he has to train again for another 3 months before they pass out. He is understandably f@@@ed off with this situation (my words) and is now considering leaving.
I believe he has done fairly well in the training (even though the platoon are constantly told how shite they all are), so it will be a shame for him and the Army if he leaves because of procedural mistakes.
My question is, can he leave just after passing out or is he then automatically committed for 4 years? I'm encouraging him to complete the basic training (even though most of it will be a repeat) before deciding on leaving, but he's worried that once this DAOR window closes then that's it for 4 years.

Help / advice much appreciated.

Is he 18 years old yet?
 
Recruits do not get to decide they are fit, that's down to the medical staff (including physios and PTI's)

Movement to a rehab platoon is not done lightly and will be for your sons best interests in order to make him fit enough to continue with training. Sometimes recruits will be moved into rehab to help them become fit enough for discharge.

Recruits will be placed back into training as near as to the point they left (or an earlier point, never later) and as soon as possible.

There is a chance you have not been given entirely accurate information.
Thanks.
Understood, however this could have been sorted within a few days if they'd let him see the physio when it was first booked, just a few days after the ankle injury. I'll check with him if it's a rehab platoon he has gone into, and I'll also tell him to ask whether he'll go back into training at the point he left off. I got the impression that he was just moved to another platoon and would have to train with them until they passed out 3 months later.
Cheers.
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
Thanks.
Understood, however this could have been sorted within a few days if they'd let him see the physio when it was first booked, just a few days after the ankle injury. I'll check with him if it's a rehab platoon he has gone into, and I'll also tell him to ask whether he'll go back into training at the point he left off. I got the impression that he was just moved to another platoon and would have to train with them until they passed out 3 months later.
Cheers.


Without knowing the injury I'd hold off on claiming when this would have been fixed by.

When I was at an ATR the physio was very involved with the med centre staff, the PTI's and rehab platoon. delays in getting anyone to further treatment was rare and only done with good reason if there was an available appointment.

Even crow with discipline issues and likely to get booted out were still being treated the same as any other.

On one occasion we had one lad coming in for the ice part of P.R.I.C.E. 6 times a day for a week to get him through his pass off parade.


We did, on occasion, move people over to the next platoon behind the point of leaving as the individual had missed too much through injury and wouldn't be able to continue with the original platoon. It was rare though.

If there isn't a point the same as when he left then he'll end up repeating parts of basic again, if he's done it once then a second time may well be boring but he should ace it. Its far better to repeat a part than be kept in rehab longer than is necessary just to join the same platoon a few weeks later. he'll have that repeated time to find his feet in the group.
 
Totally agree with your points - my understanding is that it was a minor ankle injury that resolved within a few days, however I totally accept that this would need examination / sign off by a medical professional. It seems that my son has been moved into another platoon for the duration - he's not said that he's been told it would be a temporary rehab arrangement.
 
Thanks.
Understood, however this could have been sorted within a few days if they'd let him see the physio when it was first booked, just a few days after the ankle injury. I'll check with him if it's a rehab platoon he has gone into, and I'll also tell him to ask whether he'll go back into training at the point he left off. I got the impression that he was just moved to another platoon and would have to train with them until they passed out 3 months later.
Cheers.

Physios are not part of the training establishment, therefore he will have had to travel to see one. Any number of reasons could have delayed the appt from unavailability of transport to unavailability at last minute of a physio.
 

NuggetBks

War Hero
Physios are not part of the training establishment, therefore he will have had to travel to see one. Any number of reasons could have delayed the appt from unavailability of transport to unavailability at last minute of a physio.

Complete nonsense. ITC Catterick, ATR Pirbright & AFC Harrogate have physios in the med centre. Recruits do not travel outside of camp for physios. I was an RCMT in both Pirbright and ITC.

Good luck to your son mate. Being back squaded or held in Sword or Waterloo platoon (if Catterick)can be a morale sapper. To answer your question no, if he passes out he cannot just leave. His DAOR window opens once he completes 28 days’ service excluding leave, and can discharge at any time before the end of 3 months from the date of his enlistment, but you do have to give 14 days’ notice to your Commanding Officer. Once that window closes he must do his minimum service in line with policy. However if welfare is an issue a CO can use discretion. Encourage him to talk to his training team, welfare team on camp or Padre. Don’t let him make a decision he will regret.
 

Arte_et_Marte

ADC
Moderator
@Dadoftrainee

Basic military training is hard, physically and mentally, I shouldn't need to state why this is. Nobody likes basic, getting shouted at, being cold and wet at times, spending hours cleaning and pressing various uniforms and weapons, carrying an injury until it's too painful even for the most dedicated, but it is the same for everybody and is only for a short time in his career. Life gets that much easier the longer he stays in.

He obviously wanted to join up and I am fairly certain that if he jacks it in, he will regret it later. There are too many tales, on this site, of lads that have tried it and left, then a year or two later applied again where awkward questions have to be answered as to why they were not up to the challenge first time round.

Nobody knocks an individual for being back squadded due to injury. Agreed that It is a mental challenge for a recruit to undertake, but the Directing Staff know this and will respect him for getting his head down, gritting his teeth and making a good go of it.

Good luck to your lad.
 

Slime

LE
@Dadoftrainee.

You know your boy better than anyone.
I might be missing something here, but is the injury and back squadding the main issue?

You also mentioned a different training outcome.
How much do you think this could be affecting things?

I’m asking as I can envisage a recruit being less determined to stay the course if they wouldn’t end up in the unit they originally chose.
 
Complete nonsense. ITC Catterick, ATR Pirbright & AFC Harrogate have physios in the med centre. Recruits do not travel outside of camp for physios. I was an RCMT in both Pirbright and ITC.

Good luck to your son mate. Being back squaded or held in Sword or Waterloo platoon (if Catterick)can be a morale sapper. To answer your question no, if he passes out he cannot just leave. His DAOR window opens once he completes 28 days’ service excluding leave, and can discharge at any time before the end of 3 months from the date of his enlistment, but you do have to give 14 days’ notice to your Commanding Officer. Once that window closes he must do his minimum service in line with policy. However if welfare is an issue a CO can use discretion. Encourage him to talk to his training team, welfare team on camp or Padre. Don’t let him make a decision he will regret.
Thanks - that is very helpful. I'll pass your comments on to my lad. I hope he decides to stay, but it's not looking likely.
 
@Dadoftrainee.

You know your boy better than anyone.
I might be missing something here, but is the injury and back squadding the main issue?

You also mentioned a different training outcome.
How much do you think this could be affecting things?

I’m asking as I can envisage a recruit being less determined to stay the course if they wouldn’t end up in the unit they originally chose.
I think the main issue is him having to go to a unit he didn't sign up for, and that was the Army's error ("they" have admitted that to him). The back squadding is just an additional negative, as he has worked so hard for the last few months. I can get his point - why train for an additional three months then spend 4 years in a unit that he didn't choose. He asked if the mistake could be rectified and was told "No". I'm sure he didn't push the issue. I think if he was going to end up in his chosen / agreed unit, he'd easily overcome the b@llache of re-doing some basic training.
 

NuggetBks

War Hero
Remember- All recruits are allowed unrestricted access to welfare support outside of their training platoon staff.

However in the first instance they are encouraged to approach their chain of command at platoon level. But if for any reason he doesn’t want to discuss his concerns with his instructors he can approach welfare support outside to his platoon.

Unsure from your posts if he is at Catterick or Pirbright. Either way both have fantastic welfare and support staff. He also will have access to the Padre, staff in Sandes, staff in Royal Voluntary Service, HIVE and the civvies in the Army Welfare Services. Plenty of opportunity to have a yarn and get his head straight. He won’t be the first to have the basic training blues and he can get through it. Remind him that basic training is NOT the Army. It’s just a shitty game everyone has to play. Once he passes out the real fun starts.

If he wants to call the Welfare service he can but it is ultimately better to deal with them face to face. There will be info in the Med Centre. You can grab them on 01904 882053 open Mon-Thurs 08:30-16:30, Fri 08:30-16:00. Likewise they offer support to family so you can give them a bell if you require some verified information.
 

NuggetBks

War Hero
I think the main issue is him having to go to a unit he didn't sign up for, and that was the Army's error ("they" have admitted that to him). The back squadding is just an additional negative, as he has worked so hard for the last few months. I can get his point - why train for an additional three months then spend 4 years in a unit that he didn't choose. He asked if the mistake could be rectified and was told "No". I'm sure he didn't push the issue. I think if he was going to end up in his chosen / agreed unit, he'd easily overcome the b@llache of re-doing some basic training.

He won’t necessarily be stuck in a capbadge he didn’t apply for. Once serving he can discuss with his RCMO who will be best placed to advise on how to transfer. Communication is key
 
I think the main issue is him having to go to a unit he didn't sign up for, and that was the Army's error ("they" have admitted that to him). The back squadding is just an additional negative, as he has worked so hard for the last few months. I can get his point - why train for an additional three months then spend 4 years in a unit that he didn't choose. He asked if the mistake could be rectified and was told "No". I'm sure he didn't push the issue. I think if he was going to end up in his chosen / agreed unit, he'd easily overcome the b@llache of re-doing some basic training.

Without revealing any specifics, how big a difference in units are we talking here? Was he counting on his first choice giving him a trade and now his whole life is derailed? Or just one Inf capbadge instead of another?

Not getting your first choice is not the end of the world. Happened to me and I thank my lucky stars it did because I landed on my feet in the unit I ended up in, which was one I'd never even heard of before. Ultimately your military career is what you make of it and more depends on the blokes around you than the bit of tin on your forehead.

Err and blokettes.
 
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Without revealing any specifics, how big a difference in units are we talking here? Was he counting on his first choice giving him a trade and now his whole life is derailed? Or just one Inf capbadge instead of another?

Not getting your first choice is not the end of the world. Happened to me and I thank my lucky stars it did because I landed on my feet in the unit I ended up in, which was one I'd never even heard of before. Ultimately your military career is what you make of it and more depends on the blokes around you than the bit of tin on your forehead.

Err and blokettes.
It is more about the learning and skills he would have got in his chosen unit.
 
Out of curiosity and if it's not giving away too much, which regiment did he want and which did he get?
It's not impossible to put in a transfer during training, I've seen it happen more than once.
 

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