D-Day Cover Up At Pointe Du Hoc Volume II

D-Day Cover Up At Pointe Du Hoc Volume II

untallguy

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#1
untallguy submitted a new resource:

D-Day Cover Up At Pointe Du Hoc Volume II - New facts behind the Ranger assault on the Pointe du Hoc

D-Day Cover Up At Pointe Du Hoc is a two-volume book which describes the training and preparation of the 2nd and 5th Battalions of the US Rangers and their attack on the Pointe du Hoc gun battery on D-Day; I read the second volume which covers 1st May to 10th June 1944. The author, Gary Sterne, has examined the Rangers’ mission and its execution and why it did not conduct it fully and why the commander, Lt Col James Rudder, made the changes he did.

The books’ premise (I’m taking it...
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#2

smeg-head

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Excellent review, but it does appear that Gary Sterne is desperately trying to make a bit of capital out of, what is essentially a pile of tedious reports that really do not tell that much of a story.
 
#4
untallguy submitted a new resource:

D-Day Cover Up At Pointe Du Hoc Volume II - New facts behind the Ranger assault on the Pointe du Hoc



Read more about this resource...
I exchanged emails with the author a couple of years ago when I was researching D-Day. Post D-Day, he states that Maisy gun battery was subject to a coverup and 'buried' under the OSA for 60yrs. He was working on a book back then to find out why. BTW, he seems to state that Rudder was 1st Inf Div, not 2nd Rangers, but perhaps he had not had his morning cup of coffee before tackling the emails.
Perhaps he dug something else up/found more questions than answers, as is sometimes the way?

Keeping the Maisy site going cannot be cheap, so, we cannot knock him for trying to keep a historical site going in this day and age when the younger generations do not even know a war was fought.


Gary
<gary@maisybattery.com>
18 October 2014 at 20:02​
To: Andy Farman <xxxxxxx@gmail.com>
Reply | Reply to all | Forward | Print | Delete | Show original
Hi Andy

Thanks for the info.

To answer your question full would take a while… but basically the mission to attack Maisy was and is on the 1st Infantry Divisons orders. Colonel Rudder decided not to obey them. Which is the subject of another book I am currently writing.

It is a long and complex series of events and it ultimately led to the Maisy site being buried and then denied to have existed by everyone. Incidentally, it does appear on all of the period target maps. Just not in any post war books or films.

They stopped denying it existed, when the 60 year secrecy act allowed paperwork to come to the surface, all within a year of my digging the place up. But it is a strange set of circumstances.

Regards

Gary
 
#5
I visited Maisy battery back in 2015, its an interesting place. I came home and read the book but wasn`t sold on the conspiracy theory. The book does give a good account of the Rangers assault on Pointe D`Hoc which I found far more enlightening.
 
#6
I visited Maisy battery back in 2015, its an interesting place. I came home and read the book but wasn`t sold on the conspiracy theory. The book does give a good account of the Rangers assault on Pointe D`Hoc which I found far more enlightening.
Must have been a WTF moment when they found the bunkers empty (the guns removed to the apple orchard at the rear ready for collection and re-positioning elsewhere following a Lancaster raid a few days before.)
I imagine that even if the removal of the guns had been known it was far too late in the day to change the plans.
 
#7
Must have been a WTF moment when they found the bunkers empty (the guns removed to the apple orchard at the rear ready for collection and re-positioning elsewhere following a Lancaster raid a few days before.)
I imagine that even if the removal of the guns had been known it was far too late in the day to change the plans.
Indeed, especially after clambering all that way up and fighting through the maze of spider holes and trenches.
I`ve visited the Pointe but never read up on it much. The only "awareness" I had was watching the few minutes of action in the film "The Longest Day", so the accounts in the book pressed home what a long and hard fight it was to take the position.
Incidentally, my mrs had a yap with Mr Sterne at Maisy, and he mentioned that a lot of the damage to the Pointe wasn`t from the war, but due to the French using it as a shooting range for their warships post war. I found this bit of information hard to swallow.
 
#8
Incidentally, my mrs had a yap with Mr Sterne at Maisy, and he mentioned that a lot of the damage to the Pointe wasn`t from the war, but due to the French using it as a shooting range for their warships post war. I found this bit of information hard to swallow.
I included Maisy in my research and that is a new one on me, albeit it I did not specifically hunt on its post-war history. Look at it on Google Earth, too many old buildings close by for it to have been in an impact area, in my opinion at least.
 
#9
I included Maisy in my research and that is a new one on me, albeit it I did not specifically hunt on its post-war history. Look at it on Google Earth, too many old buildings close by for it to have been in an impact area, in my opinion at least.
Yes, naval gunfire onto the mainland where there are habitations nearby, a bizarre claim really. The chances of a shell going astray and the damage it could cause doesn`t bear thinking about. I do wonder where he got the idea from.
 

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