D Day 75

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Some old boys go back to the town they liberated and get the surprise of their lives.
 
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I noticed that Sky News had British veterans talking about the Germans but Sky themselves were talking about the Nazis. The maps they displayed referred to Nazis rather than Germany, German Army or Axis.
In Warsaw there are many memorials on sections of pavements, walls and buildings where locals were murdered by the Nazis.

Virtually every memorial mentions "Hitlerites", not Germans and not Nazis.

My office building is built on the railway sidings which took people off to the Konzentrationslager.
 

Ritch

LE
I don't mind to admit that I have a few tears in my eyes listening to the readings and the veterans on BBC2
 
Bumped into a French friend this morning who said she’d watched the event in Southsea yesterday.
She was very complimentary and particularly of the standing ovations accorded to the Veterans.
“But, Tracks, your protocol people made a huge, huge mistake.
“Merkel was there representing Germany, and nobody, nobody asked for a big round of applause for the losers.”
I think the correct term is ‘runners up’.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
RIP
VG, if modest by comparison with Southsea, Normandy etc, commemoration at the COPP (Combined Ops Pilotage Parties) memorial (1st pic) on Hayling island:
COPP Memorial.JPG

COPP trained in super secrecy at Haying Sailing Club.

Duke of Gloucester working the crowd after the main tamasha was over
D of Gloucester works the crowd.JPG


As a starter we had the 'Fort Cumberland Guard' firing muskets and this 3 pdr
Fort Cumberland Guard 4.JPG


Plus some Jeeps (but file 'too large', sorry)

As to the Media nationally, not bad I thought with plenty of coverage. Booby prize to (guess who) the Daily Mail for captioning HMS Queen Elizabeth as MV Boudicca.
 
VG, if modest by comparison with Southsea, Normandy etc, commemoration at the COPP (Combined Ops Pilotage Parties) memorial (1st pic) on Hayling island:
View attachment 397273
COPP trained in super secrecy at Haying Sailing Club.

Duke of Gloucester working the crowd after the main tamasha was over
View attachment 397274

As a starter we had the 'Fort Cumberland Guard' firing muskets and this 3 pdr
View attachment 397275

Plus some Jeeps (but file 'too large', sorry)

As to the Media nationally, not bad I thought with plenty of coverage. Booby prize to (guess who) the Daily Mail for captioning HMS Queen Elizabeth as MV Boudicca.
What are they guarding? The pies?

On a more sentimental note.
 
Talk about confusion and carnage! And plain bad luck.


Arguably saved a lot more lives than it cost. Very important lessons were learned for Overlord.

Everyone standardised frequencies.
Much better anti E boat defences on the day that effectively defanged them. With a target rich environment of epic proportions and playing at home, they hardly made any impact
Lots of rescue boats put in the plan that picked a lot of men out of the water who would otherwise have drowned from sunk/swamped ships, landing craft and vehicles.
 
Shot of the day for me.


In Bayeux, D-Day veteran John Quinn met George Sayer, aged 6
xxxxzzzzxxx_107261238_normandy_15.jpg
 

Ned_Seagoon

War Hero
In southern Normandy today, in between viewing the main events, and wearing tourist rig rather than commemoration formal, I popped into a store to take aging mother shopping. A local overheard us speaking English and came across to thanks us for what the British nation did for France. Her words were “You saved our country”. She was a post war child and clearly remembers the devastation and how long it took to reconstruct Normandy. We ended up having a long chat and it was genuinely moving.
 

PFGEN

GCM
Having watched the Beeb yesterday and preparing to watch today, the coverage of the events so far has been excellent but most of the commentary has been banal beyond belief! Huw Edwards and Dan Snow come out with the most brain-dead gibberish when a bit of hush would let the pictures speak for themselves. I would much rather hear the oral histories of the old boys (without the interviewers butting in with their pointless questions) - give them a beer or two and let them loose with their dits!

The stage show was a game of two halves, as well. I enjoyed hearing the letters home and the historical vignettes, but the re-enactments and the song and dance routines were just painful. I am hoping for a little more solemnity, pomp and circumstance today, but not holding my breath.
Thankfully recorded most of the events of the last two days and am now catching up. Tend to agree with the song and dance part however looking around a lot of the old lads seemed to be enjoying it so what the heck it's their event. As usual the Queen lends such an event a level of class that many could learn from. Nice toch when she also stood during the ovation.

Found a pile of photos on the website of the paper that shall not be mentioned. I'll say one thing about them. When it comes to events like this they usually have an excellent photo series with quite a few pictures to make one stop and think. I'm looking forward to catching up with the events in France.

My old man would have been 96 had he lived so time for some quiet moments and a glass of nippy sweetie in honour of him and his mates. He landed on Sword beach on day one as a metrologist, his job to get back weather reports as well as perform sound ranging for the artillery in no mans land. Asked why he volunteered; simple answer was because it was the right thing to do. The experience marked him for the rest of his life. No glory, just some shaggy dog stories which to my shame I didn't always believe, that was until I was clearing out his papers and found the evidence supporting a few of the wilder tales. Proud of him and still miss him.
 
Bumped into a French friend this morning who said she’d watched the event in Southsea yesterday.
She was very complimentary and particularly of the standing ovations accorded to the Veterans.
“But, Tracks, your protocol people made a huge, huge mistake.
“Merkel was there representing Germany, and nobody, nobody asked for a big round of applause for the losers.”
Joking aside, if one had really wanted to present Frau M with a dilemma, it would have been to ask her to commemorate the incredibly brave German and Austrian "traitors" who served with No 3 Troop, 10 Commando.

Mostly Jewish, all given fake British names and personnel records, and usually attached as individual specialist linguists to Commandos, SAS, SBS, etc - true nationality concealed even from their comrades. At least three were killed in action on 6 June in Normandy, and several more in the following days. There was one civil servant in the casualty section at the War Office who kept parallel lists of their true and fake identities, to ensure that, if killed, they were remembered properly under their real name.

Thinking about it, the only person who could be more embarrassed about having to commemorate them than Frau M would probably be JC... I believe the only memorial to the 3 Tp casualties is a grove of trees on a Rothschild estate.
 
Joking aside, if one had really wanted to present Frau M with a dilemma, it would have been to ask her to commemorate the incredibly brave German and Austrian "traitors" who served with No 3 Troop, 10 Commando.

Mostly Jewish, all given fake British names and personnel records, and usually attached as individual specialist linguists to Commandos, SAS, SBS, etc - true nationality concealed even from their comrades. At least three were killed in action on 6 June in Normandy, and several more in the following days. There was one civil servant in the casualty section at the War Office who kept parallel lists of their true and fake identities, to ensure that, if killed, they were remembered properly under their real name.

Thinking about it, the only person who could be more embarrassed about having to commemorate them than Frau M would probably be JC... I believe the only memorial to the 3 Tp casualties is a grove of trees on a Rothschild estate.
Interesting. During the ceremony at Bayeux Cemetery yesterday, the BBC camera panned over a headstone with a German Cross and name.
When I saw it, I wondered whether it was for a German citizen who had gone ashore as an interpreter, or some such, possibly on the Int side.
It looks as if you’ve answered my question.
As an aside, the CWGC at Assisi has a small number of headstones to Italian partisans.
 
Joking aside, if one had really wanted to present Frau M with a dilemma, it would have been to ask her to commemorate the incredibly brave German and Austrian "traitors" who served with No 3 Troop, 10 Commando.

Mostly Jewish, all given fake British names and personnel records, and usually attached as individual specialist linguists to Commandos, SAS, SBS, etc - true nationality concealed even from their comrades. At least three were killed in action on 6 June in Normandy, and several more in the following days. There was one civil servant in the casualty section at the War Office who kept parallel lists of their true and fake identities, to ensure that, if killed, they were remembered properly under their real name.
Same with Norwegian, Dutch, Belgian, French, Czech and Polish airmen, I believe.
Also to protect their families in occupied Europe
 
Same with Norwegian, Dutch, Belgian, French, Czech and Polish airmen, I believe.
Also to protect their families in occupied Europe
Nowhere to the same degree. After all, the codes and markings on most Free Force aircraft usually gave a pretty good indication of the occupant's nationality, so even a cursory examination of intact wreckage would give the game away. Most of the Free aircrew did not try to hide their identity, and those with prior service at home sometimes even flew wearing elements of their old uniforms if available. 320 Sqn (NL) RAF produced some very interesting uniforms, on the ground at least, as most of its personnel were Cloggie matelots - RAF battledress plus Dutch naval headdress for example.
 

offog

LE
Interesting. During the ceremony at Bayeux Cemetery yesterday, the BBC camera panned over a headstone with a German Cross and name.
When I saw it, I wondered whether it was for a German citizen who had gone ashore as an interpreter, or some such, possibly on the Int side.
It looks as if you’ve answered my question.
As an aside, the CWGC at Assisi has a small number of headstones to Italian partisans.
There are a number of German dead in that cemetery who have a different headstone to the Commonwealth ones.
 

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