Dürer's Fight Book: The Genius of the German Renaissance and His Combat Treatise

Dürer's Fight Book: The Genius of the German Renaissance and His Combat Treatise

Grownup_Rafbrat

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A review posted on NavyNet by @rebbonk
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This book came at an interesting time as I’ve recently been researching the British artist Heywood Hardy for a project I’m carrying out. Unfortunately, the book seems a little confused and I’m not sure what sub-genre of history this book is supposed to be, art or fighting, though I guess it could cross both? Until reading this book I’d never heard of...

Click here to read the full review.....
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

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That's the first time a book review has been awarded a dumb! Sorry @rebbonk you seem to have upset someone!

Can we expect a reason for this articulate comment?
 
I have two criticisms about the review. The first and most immediately obvious one to me (although perhaps not to him) is that the reviewer linked to images on navy-net.co.uk. These images will not display in my browser (Firefox) in the page, but they do if I open them in a separate tab.

I suspect this is either do to something in the configuration of navy-net to discourage linking from other sites (some sites do this to limit bandwidth costs) or is the result of a security problem detected by my browser. Copying the images to ARRSE should correct this.

The other problem is that the Amazon web page linked to has a review which the reading of perhaps could have relieved some of the confusion of the ARRSE reviewer had he paid it more attention.

Durer was both an artist and a fencer. This book is one of a number produced by fencing experts in the medieval and renaissance periods on fencing and fencing techniques.

"Fencing" in this period and up until the end of the 19th century referred to practising for the purposes of fighting with actual swords in combat, whether on the battlefield or in duels. This was a martial art and so a very different thing from modern day Olympic style sport fencing which has become a game of scoring points using "swords" which no longer have any resemblance to actual swords.

In the past few decades a number of people have become disillusioned with what modern sport fencing has become and are reviving the original forms of this martial art based on copies of the original manuscripts. They are getting access to the original manuscripts, scanning them, translating them, and publishing them for people to study and learn from. This is the main market this book would appear to be addressing.

Historical fencing would include grappling (wrestling) and fighting with daggers, as both could come into play during the course of a fight. Since this was deadly serious combat then yes, kicking someone in the crotch was indeed considered to be a valid technique in the right circumstances.

I won't criticize the reviewer too much for not knowing about the context of what is a very niche interest, but I would suggest that he fixes the issue with the images not displaying.
 
Copying the images to ARRSE could well be a copyright infringement, so no. Also fairly sure @Grownup_Rafbrat is of the female persuasion.

Edited for spelling.
I will defer to @Grownup_Rafbrat on the question of copyright, but as I understand the law a few samples of text or images which are included in a serious review are considered to be permitted under copyright law. What is not permitted is wholesale copying with no additional creative effort added to it.

As for the second part of your post, the reviewer was rebbonk , not Grownup_Rafbrat. Grownup_Rafbrat is the manager here and delegates most of the reviews to her underlings. As for rebbonk, I apologize if I have assumed his/her/its gender.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

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I have two criticisms about the review. The first and most immediately obvious one to me (although perhaps not to him) is that the reviewer linked to images on navy-net.co.uk. These images will not display in my browser (Firefox) in the page, but they do if I open them in a separate tab.

I suspect this is either do to something in the configuration of navy-net to discourage linking from other sites (some sites do this to limit bandwidth costs) or is the result of a security problem detected by my browser. Copying the images to ARRSE should correct this.

The other problem is that the Amazon web page linked to has a review which the reading of perhaps could have relieved some of the confusion of the ARRSE reviewer had he paid it more attention.

Durer was both an artist and a fencer. This book is one of a number produced by fencing experts in the medieval and renaissance periods on fencing and fencing techniques.

"Fencing" in this period and up until the end of the 19th century referred to practising for the purposes of fighting with actual swords in combat, whether on the battlefield or in duels. This was a martial art and so a very different thing from modern day Olympic style sport fencing which has become a game of scoring points using "swords" which no longer have any resemblance to actual swords.

In the past few decades a number of people have become disillusioned with what modern sport fencing has become and are reviving the original forms of this martial art based on copies of the original manuscripts. They are getting access to the original manuscripts, scanning them, translating them, and publishing them for people to study and learn from. This is the main market this book would appear to be addressing.

Historical fencing would include grappling (wrestling) and fighting with daggers, as both could come into play during the course of a fight. Since this was deadly serious combat then yes, kicking someone in the crotch was indeed considered to be a valid technique in the right circumstances.

I won't criticize the reviewer too much for not knowing about the context of what is a very niche interest, but I would suggest that he fixes the issue with the images not displaying.
My dear, the reviewer put the review on Navynet. I though it would be of interest here and copied it, but the pictures didn't copy. They are on the navynet version if you care to look. I also add the Amazon link.

The Book Reviewers read the books and speak of their own experience. I often send books to people with no knowledge of a subject, and they give it their best shot. They are volunteers, who review books in their spare time.

I don't expect them to be called dumb because their experience isn't your experience.

You could have shared your knowledge in a positive way, adding to the pool of knowledge we all have.

Just putting a dumb against it helps no-one.
 
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My dear, the reviewer put the review on Navynet. I though it would be of interest here and copied it, but the pictures didn't copy. They are on the navynet version if you care to look. I also add the Amazon link.

The Book Reviewers read the books and speak of their own experience. I often send books to people with no knowledge of a subject, and they give it their best shot. They are volunteers, who review books in their spare time.

I don't expect them to be called dumb because their experience isn't your experience.

You could have shared your knowledge in a positive way, adding to the pool of knowledge we all have.

Just putting a dumb against it helps no-one.
I didn't give a "dumb" to the review and don't think it deserved one either. As I said in my previous post, "I won't criticize the reviewer too much for not knowing about the context of what is a very niche interest".

If anything I think that giving a review a "dumb" or any other negative rating is very unhelpful and anyone who has any criticisms of a review should try to write a constructive post on where they think the review was wrong and how the review could have been improved.

I wasn't aware that the review had been copied by you (as opposed to by the author of the review), nor that you were the one who added the Amazon link, so I apologize for making unwarranted assumptions in that regards.

I thought the reviewer did a fairly good job of relating what the production quality of the book was like, and someone who is in the target market will know whether it is meant for them.

Most of my post was related to relating what I knew about the subject and I hope that it would help other people understand what the book is about and who it is aimed at.
 

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