Cyber Security: UK Int Panel warns against Huawei...

I guess all those security issues have been resolved then?*

*Possibly by a certain video being copied from Moscow to Beijing.
Your link is blocked at my location, but here's some alternate ones which I will comment on.
Trump Surprises G20 With Huawei Concession: U.S. Companies Can Sell To Huawei
Huawei can buy from US suppliers again — but things will never be the same – TechCrunch
Trump Bows to Xi Jinping's Huawei Demands at G20

The ban on US companies selling to Huawei is being lifted apparently within the next few days. When those American companies complained about how much money they stood to lose, all of a sudden Huawei wasn't such a big security problem after all.
“US companies can sell their equipment to Huawei. We’re talking about equipment where there’s no great national security problem with it,” the U.S. President said.
The other American "issues" with Huawei will be decided when trade talks are complete. This is believed to refer to US efforts to get other countries to ban Huawei telecommunications kit and the US extradition request for Meng Wanzhou (currently held in Canada awaiting an extradition hearing).
Trump, in his initial comments at the press conference in Osaka, said that Huawei matters would be decided at the end of the trade talks. Presumably this is a reference to efforts of his administration last month to prevent the company from selling telecommunications equipment to American network operators—Trump last month issued an executive order on the subject—and perhaps a reference to the Justice Department’s criminal prosecutions of Huawei and its chief financial officer, Meng Wanzhou. The U.S. has filed an extradition request for Meng, currently held in Vancouver.
However, things are unlikely to simply go back to where they were before all this started. Huawei will continue with their efforts to decouple themselves from American suppliers so that they can never be used as a pawn in a trade war again.
Despite the good news, any mutual trust has been broken and things are unlikely to be the same again.

America’s almost casual move to blacklist Huawei — the latest in a series of strategies in its ongoing trade battle with China — exemplifies just how dependent the company has become on the U.S. to simply function.

Huawei has taken steps to hedge its reliance on America, including the development of its own operating system to replace Android and its own backup chips, and you can expect that these projects will go into overdrive to ensure that Huawei doesn’t find itself in a similar position again in the future.

Of course, decoupling its supply chain from US partners is no easy task both in terms of software and components. It remains to be seen if Huawei could maintain its current business level — which included 59 million smartphones in the last quarter and total revenue of $107.4 billion in 2018 — with non-US components and software but this episode is a reminder that it must have a solid contingency policy in case it becomes a political chess piece again in the future.
Now of course this raises the question of where this leaves those people in other countries such as the UK who were baying to ban Huawei as a "national security threat". Are they going to continue with this line if the US decides that Huawei has served its purpose as a bargaining chip in trade talks and drops their objections? How are they going to explain themselves if they change their positions?

The UK and Canada both stalling on making any decisions about banning Huawei begin to make sense when viewed in the light of recent developments.


P.S. The US dropped their "national security threat" objections to the Canadian steel and aluminium industries a couple of weeks ago once Trump decided he needed Canada's help to deal with a domestic political problem. Anybody who is surprised by how quickly "national security threats" can re-evaluated once cash and polls are on the line hasn't been paying attention.
 
Anybody who is surprised by how quickly "national security threats" can re-evaluated once cash and polls are on the line hasn't been paying attention.
Or doesn't realise that the US definition of national security includes 'always getting our way in everything.'
 
So has my Huewai P10 been spying on me for the last 2 years and am I safe now I have a Samsung?

Never had an issue with it, great camera, software works flawlessly. Supposed to be giving it to Surly girl teen No.2, but in two minds as I can't think of anything this Note9 does better and the p10 has the better camera.
I might just give her the note.
Can't switch the camera noise off on the note.
Can't have the screen permanently on, so trying to watch stuff every ten minutes it sleeps as 10 minutes is the maximum.
 
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And speaking of blocking exports of essential high tech goods to damage another country's major industries in the name of "national security" while actually trying to extract unrelated concessions from them: Japan slaps restrictions on tech exports to South Korea

Japan has restricted exports of three materials which are essential to South Korea's key semiconductor industry in the name of "national security". Think of just how much of South Korea's exports consists of things with electronics in them, and of how much of global RAM, Flash, and CPU production resides in South Korea, and you begin to get an idea of how big of a deal this is.
Tokyo is set to introduce a system to examine and approve exports of three types of high-tech materials. It will also remove South Korea from a "white list" of countries that face minimum restrictions on transfers of technology with national security implications.

(...) Removal from the "white list" means all South Korea-bound exports of advanced technologies and electronic parts that have the potential for military use will require Japanese government approval.
Japanese suppliers control 90% of the global market in these materials.
Combined, Japanese suppliers control about 90% of the global resist and etching gas markets. The new screening process is expected to slow down exports, potentially hurting the South Korean electronics makers that buy the materials.
The South Korean government is not taking this very well, and the top levels of government in Seoul are talking about retaliation.
The South Korean government held a high-level emergency meeting on Monday to discuss Japan's move. That afternoon, South Korea's trade ministry said Seoul would take necessary measures, such as filing a complaint with the World Trade Organization.

In late May, Foreign Minister Kang Kyung-wha had hinted at possible retaliation if Japan imposed sanctions, telling the South Korean legislature that the government "will not sit back."
The real root of the issue seems to be a ruling by the South Korean Supreme Court that certain Japanese companies are liable for their use of South Korean slave labour during WWII, and the court is therefore selling off assets belonging to those companies to pay for compensation.
In an incident that has soured relations between the two countries, South Korea's Supreme Court has ordered Japanese industrial groups to compensate South Koreans forced to work for them during World War II. The plaintiffs are in the process of selling assets seized from the Japanese companies as part of the compensation. The sales, if they go ahead, would be damaging to the Japanese businesses.
The South Korean government are refusing to interfere with the court judgement despite protests from Japan.
Despite Tokyo's protests, the South Korean government has said it respects the independence of the judiciary.
Well now that our trusted ally and partner Japan has declared that South Korean companies are "threats to national security", surely we should all be rushing to ban everything made by Samsung, LG, and a host of other South Korean companies, shouldn't we? I mean God forbid that we would want to look hypocritical on this by ignoring it!
 
I mean God forbid that we would want to look hypocritical on this by ignoring it!
Given the number of hats that were launched on three hairs when the PRC cut off rare earth exports to Japan as a political bargaining tool, our principles would surely see us criticising Japan for this measure.

Cue deafening silence in 3..., 2..., 1...
 
Not only do Huawei supply a lot of wireless kit they also have a big presence in broadband street cabinets in the UK which looks to be getting bigger.

Openreach (the broadband network infrastructure outfit) are looking for Night Migration Engineers to remove problematic ECI cabinets and replace them with Huawei.

"According to TBB, Openreach has about 25,000 ECI cabinets and 64,000 Huawei. "

"All your base are belong to us!"

Openreach UK Could Replace ECI FTTC Broadband Cabinets with Huawei - ISPreview UK
 
No 'technical' reason: that's alright then. Don't worry about the security issues, but I guess that was outside the committee's TORs.

'The House of Commons Science and Technology Committee have concluded that Huawei should not be barred from UK 5G and conventional telecoms networks.

'In a letter last week to the Security of State for Digital, Jeremy Wright MP [PDF], the Committee chair Norman Lamb MP claimed: "We have found no evidence from our work to suggest that the complete exclusion of Huawei from the UK's telecommunications networks would, from a technical point of view, constitute a proportionate response to the potential security threat posed by foreign suppliers." The letter was written following an inquiry by the Committee that took evidence from, among other organisations, UK mobile network operators. "Regardless of the actual security risk posed by equipment from Huawei or any other vendor, telecommunications networks are designed such that they are secure even if their individual components are not," the letter added.'

No technical reason for Huawei 5G ban, claims House of Commons Science and Technology Committee | Computing
 
In other weird and unrelated news. We already have 5G here in the middle of BFN... Totally in shock, but damn the Xbox connection is the shit now!
 
No 'technical' reason: that's alright then. Don't worry about the security issues, but I guess that was outside the committee's TORs.

'The House of Commons Science and Technology Committee have concluded that Huawei should not be barred from UK 5G and conventional telecoms networks.

'In a letter last week to the Security of State for Digital, Jeremy Wright MP [PDF], the Committee chair Norman Lamb MP claimed: "We have found no evidence from our work to suggest that the complete exclusion of Huawei from the UK's telecommunications networks would, from a technical point of view, constitute a proportionate response to the potential security threat posed by foreign suppliers." The letter was written following an inquiry by the Committee that took evidence from, among other organisations, UK mobile network operators. "Regardless of the actual security risk posed by equipment from Huawei or any other vendor, telecommunications networks are designed such that they are secure even if their individual components are not," the letter added.'

No technical reason for Huawei 5G ban, claims House of Commons Science and Technology Committee | Computing
There were no technical issues as in there was no objective evidence that the kit would be a security risk. The report notes that the government may decide to ban Huawei kit for political or diplomatic reasons, but there is nothing about the kit itself which would justify banning it.

The report also recommends looking into putting other vendors such as Erisson and Nokia under the same sort of scrutiny that Huawei has been receiving.

Representatives from Vodafone and O2 told us that they would support the establishment of similar arrangements for vendors other than Huawei, for example Nokia and Erisson. ... The Government should consult the National Cyber Security Centre on the merit of establishing equivalent cyber security evaluation centres for 5G equipment vendors other than Huawei.
Canada requires that all suppliers go through an independent security evaluation and has so far not found any reason to ban Huawei kit either.
 
Somewhat relevant to this thread is that Canada is reportedly watching how Britain is handing the security question and could follow suite.
www.cbc.ca/news/politics/canada-china-huawei-5g-1.5212349?cmp=rss
Canada is watching what Britain does very closely, said the third source, indicating Ottawa could take a similar decision.
No decision on this is expected before the upcoming election, partially because the revue is apparently still under way, and partially because of unrelated diplomatic considerations (e.g. the government not wanting to aggravate the Meng arrest and subsequent fall out).
 

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