Cyber Security: UK Int Panel warns against Huawei...

Some interesting bits in the attached article, from a somewhat unusual source..

'Successive governments (Tony Blair, Gordon Brown, David Cameron, Theresa May) have favoured Huawei, even while the government’s communications security agency GCHQ has warned about security flaws in its products and its superficial responses.

'On Monday, Huawei’s grandly titled Global Cyber Security and Privacy Officer was telling the Science and Technology Select Committee in Parliament that Huawei obeys the laws of the countries in which it operates. By implication, then, Huawei obeys Chinese laws obliging such companies to co-operate in espionage. Although he refused to confirm these particular laws, he confirmed that Huawei’s chairwoman, Sun Yafang, previously worked for China’s spy agency.'


May’s hypocrisy on Huawei | The Conservative Woman
 
Some interesting bits in the attached article, from a somewhat unusual source..

'Successive governments (Tony Blair, Gordon Brown, David Cameron, Theresa May) have favoured Huawei, even while the government’s communications security agency GCHQ has warned about security flaws in its products and its superficial responses.

'On Monday, Huawei’s grandly titled Global Cyber Security and Privacy Officer was telling the Science and Technology Select Committee in Parliament that Huawei obeys the laws of the countries in which it operates. By implication, then, Huawei obeys Chinese laws obliging such companies to co-operate in espionage. Although he refused to confirm these particular laws, he confirmed that Huawei’s chairwoman, Sun Yafang, previously worked for China’s spy agency.'

May’s hypocrisy on Huawei | The Conservative Woman
Are you able to provide a verifiable reference to these extraordinary laws and reveal how they operate in this country, hmm?

Take your time, mate,

I'm busy looking up tumbleweed .gifs in anticipation of your reply.
 
Are you able to provide a verifiable reference to these extraordinary laws and reveal how they operate in this country, hmm?

Take your time, mate,

I'm busy looking up tumbleweed .gifs in anticipation of your reply.
I'd suggest you ask the author. His details were in the link.
 
The story states:
Huawei is looking into creating a mobile operating system based on Sailfish OS as its alternative to Android, a new report has claimed. The Sailfish OS fork is called Aurora OS and is Russian-made. Huawei is allegedly pursuing Aurora OS despite also developing its own in-house operating system – Hongmeng OS.
However, as noted in previous posts, there is widespread speculation that Hongmeng OS (also known as Arc OS) is itself a version of Sailfish rather than something completely new. If so, then Hongmeng and Aurora will actually be closely related rather than being two completely different things and Huawei would be pursuing just one alternative to Android rather than two.
 
UK chip company IQE saw their share price take a battering when they announced they would be affected by the American Huawei ban.
Welsh chip slinger IQE's shares drop by a third after blaming Huawei ban for falling revenues
Welsh chip and wafer maker IQE's shares fell by almost a third this morning when it warned that the impact of the United States' Huawei ban is likely to be worse than expected.

IQE stock has recovered slightly but was still down 29.76 per cent at the time of writing, following news that it expects revenues in the second half of the year to be in the range of £140m to £160m versus analysts' predictions of £175m.
They expect to see their wireless business drop by 20 to 25 percent. They also said the US ban is having "far-reaching and long-lasting impacts on global supply chains".
It expects its wireless business to drop by between 20 and 25 per cent, compared to previous warnings of a 10 per cent dip.

Dr Drew Nelson, IQE chief exec, said: "These are unprecedented times for the global semiconductor industry as geopolitical conditions affect interconnected global supply chains.

"It is now clear that the impact of Huawei's addition to the US Bureau of Industry and Security's Entity List is having far-reaching and long-lasting impacts on global supply chains... We are also taking prudent expenditure actions in order to manage through this period of uncertainty."
In other news, Vodafone have told reporters that the UK government need to get on with making a decision on whether or not to ban Huawei equipment in UK 5G networks. The 5G base stations need to be deployed on top of 4G equipment, and both need to come from the same vendor. This means that banning Huawei 5G kit in the UK means tearing out and replacing existing stations, not just picking a new vendor.
Vodafone's CTO told The Reg yesterday that the UK government needs to get a wiggle on with approving or banning Huawei equipment in UK 5G networks. He said the current generation of 5G base stations need to be deployed on top of 4G kit and they both need to come from the same vendor. So a UK ban would require removing 4G stations, not just finding a new 5G vendor. The review was meant to be released in spring this year.
This sounds like a rather expensive decision and I have to wonder if UK phone companies expect the government to finanically compensate them for what would amount to government expropriation of part of their assets.
 
My office has a 4G mast on the roof. Next weekend, it will be upgraded to 5G (office closed, cranes on site &c). So the decision must have been taken.
 
About half VF's radio network is vendor H, the rest is Ericsson. The official line about "OK in the access network, 50% total spend" is chosen quite carefully to leave the carriers free to make their own decisions.
 
My office has a 4G mast on the roof. Next weekend, it will be upgraded to 5G (office closed, cranes on site &c). So the decision must have been taken.
There's already Huawei 5G cell stations up and running in the UK. This is why companies are particularly concerned. It isn't just a matter of what they buy in future, but also about how much existing kit they may be required to rip out and replace at much expense.

And it's not just 5G kit that is affected, Huawei is used very extensively in the existing 4G system and much of the 5G change is just upgrades to that equipment. That could mean that much of the existing cell network across the UK may have to be ripped out. That could amount to some very serious money.
 
About half VF's radio network is vendor H, the rest is Ericsson. The official line about "OK in the access network, 50% total spend" is chosen quite carefully to leave the carriers free to make their own decisions.
From what I've read about the situation in the UK the network operators don't buy all their kit from a single vendor. They tend to buy some bits from one vendor and other bits from another vendor, depending upon who has the best kit for each function. The result is that each cell station will have a mix of kit from different vendors. Huawei's technology is considered to be the best and most advanced in specific areas (particularly antenna kit), and this is the kit the operators want to buy from them. Nobody makes the best of everything when it comes to 5G although apparently Huawei comes closest to that.

Huawei are doing complete turn-key systems in some third world countries who don't have the ability to engineer their own systems, but not in the UK where the existing operators are more used to designing cell network systems.
 
UK operator Three say that 5G roll-out for them is "imminent". They will be using Huawei kit, as Huawei are the most advanced in that field and the other vendors are well behind.
www.theregister.co.uk/2019/06/27/huawei_has_best_kit_for_5g_says_three/
Speaking to The Register, Phil Sheppard said the commercial roll-out of 5G is "imminent".

He said: "In order [for us] to launch 5G this year, they are the most advanced company. They have the technology available now - and most of the other vendors are behind."
Three uses Nokia kit in the "core" network and Huawei in the radio access network.
Three - a subsidiary of Hong Kong giant CK Hutchison Holdings - uses Nokia in its core network and Huawei within its radio access network – as per the guidance of the UK's National Cyber Security Centre.
They talked to the NCSC and got their advice on what to do and selected the kit on that basis.
"We did go through quite a comprehensive process evaluating them. We talked to NCSC and got advice of what was good and what wasn't and they were selected on that basis."
Like Vodaphone, Three said that banning all Huawei kit means not just stopping 5G, but it also means ripping out much of the existing 4G network.
Echoing the concerns of Vodafone's CTO Scott Petty, he said Three would also need to replace a large proportion of its 4G infrastructure to deploy 5G, if the government's delayed Telecoms Supply Chain Review states Huawei can no longer be used in its infrastructure.
Three said that by the end of the year they will have 5G in 25 towns across the UK.
By the end of the year Three has said its 5G network will be available in 25 towns across the UK — including London, Cardiff, Glasgow, Birmingham, Manchester, and Liverpool.
 
3UK has a single solid 100MHz block in the 3.5GHz band so watch 'em go, at least where they bother to build it.
 

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