Cyber Security: UK Int Panel warns against Huawei...

#61
From today's Times:

Huawei says Fedex meddled with mail
Didi Tang, Beijing
May 29 2019, 9:00am, The Times


Huawei claims that packages destined for its head office in China ended up in TennesseeVCG/GETTY IMAGES


Huawei has said that it is reviewing its relationship with Fedex after claiming that the delivery company rerouted two of its packages to the United States and tried to divert two others.

Two packages addressed to Huawei’s China office, sent from Tokyo on May 19 and May 20, ended up at the delivery company’s head office in Memphis, Tennessee, three days later.

Huawei said the company had also tried to reroute two other packages sent from Hanoi in Vietnam to Huawei’s offices in Hong Kong and Singapore. One has now been delivered to its correct destination with no indication of tampering, the company said.

“The recent experiences where important commercial documents sent via Fedex were either diverted to, or were requested to be diverted to, Fedex in the United States, undermines our confidence,” Joe Kelly, a spokesman for Huawei, told Reuters.

The company said the four packages contained urgent commercial documents. Huawei said that both Vietnam packages were sent by its shipping agent, a contractor. It added that the shipping agent had refused permission for Fedex to send the packages to America and ordered that they be returned.

Fedex apologised for the error on its Chinese social media account, saying it had “mishandled” the packages.
The rerouting comes amid escalating tensions between China and western countries over the use of Chinese technology. The US government has placed Huawei on its “entity list”, banning it from access to US technology and equipment and preventing US tech companies from doing business with it. Huawei says that it is not controlled by the Chinese government or its military.

Huawei formally took legal action against the American government today, asking a court in Texas to rule that the ban of Huawei’s products was unconstitutional.

Song Liuping, the technology company’s chief legal officer, said the ban set a “dangerous precedent” that would harm billions of consumers and affect “tens of thousands of American jobs”.

“Politicians in the US are using the strength of an entire nation to come after a private company,” he said. “This is not normal.”
Yawn... China is viewed as a hostile nation these days. They can expect nothing but the best from now on.
 
#62
From today's Times:

Huawei says Fedex meddled with mail
Didi Tang, Beijing
May 29 2019, 9:00am, The Times


Huawei claims that packages destined for its head office in China ended up in TennesseeVCG/GETTY IMAGES


Huawei has said that it is reviewing its relationship with Fedex after claiming that the delivery company rerouted two of its packages to the United States and tried to divert two others.

Two packages addressed to Huawei’s China office, sent from Tokyo on May 19 and May 20, ended up at the delivery company’s head office in Memphis, Tennessee, three days later.

Huawei said the company had also tried to reroute two other packages sent from Hanoi in Vietnam to Huawei’s offices in Hong Kong and Singapore. One has now been delivered to its correct destination with no indication of tampering, the company said.

“The recent experiences where important commercial documents sent via Fedex were either diverted to, or were requested to be diverted to, Fedex in the United States, undermines our confidence,” Joe Kelly, a spokesman for Huawei, told Reuters.

The company said the four packages contained urgent commercial documents. Huawei said that both Vietnam packages were sent by its shipping agent, a contractor. It added that the shipping agent had refused permission for Fedex to send the packages to America and ordered that they be returned.

Fedex apologised for the error on its Chinese social media account, saying it had “mishandled” the packages.
The rerouting comes amid escalating tensions between China and western countries over the use of Chinese technology. The US government has placed Huawei on its “entity list”, banning it from access to US technology and equipment and preventing US tech companies from doing business with it. Huawei says that it is not controlled by the Chinese government or its military.

Huawei formally took legal action against the American government today, asking a court in Texas to rule that the ban of Huawei’s products was unconstitutional.

Song Liuping, the technology company’s chief legal officer, said the ban set a “dangerous precedent” that would harm billions of consumers and affect “tens of thousands of American jobs”.

“Politicians in the US are using the strength of an entire nation to come after a private company,” he said. “This is not normal.”
This is the same method that the US uses to install back doors into kit from companies such as Cisco. They get the shipping companies to ship the targetted kit to the NSA who have nondescript warehouse operations dedicated to this and install the backdoors and then forward it on. Cisco had to resort to trying to ship through dead drop addresses for some customers to try to get around it.

Nobody has really followed up on whether the shipping companies are willingly involved in this, or whether the NSA has so thoroughly hacked their IT systems that they can take complete control of any parcel in their system.

As for why the US might want the documents mentioned in the above story, the US has apparently placed a high priority on Huawei's commercial relationships to try to find out who they are doing business with. This was evident in the case of Meng's arrest and extradition request, and it will likely be so now that Huawei will be looking for alternate suppliers outside US control.
 
#63
Press reports say that the Chinese government are "seriously considering" restricting the export of rare earth elements to the US.
www.cbc.ca/news/business/china-us-rare-earths-1.5154338?cmp=rss
... Global Times Editor-in-chief Hu Xijin wrote on Twitter:
"Based on what I know, China is seriously considering restricting rare earth exports to the U.S. China may also take other countermeasures in the future."
Beijing has not made any official comments on this, but a government official made comments that suggested they may adopt a policy which produces this effect even if it does not explicitly target the US.
A senior official from China's National Development and Reform Commission told the Xinhua news agency on Tuesday that Beijing will give domestic demand for rare earths priority, but will meet reasonable demand from other countries.
And president Xi visited a rare earth company last week, causing increasing speculation that China may be thinking about the issue.
President Xi Jinping visited a rare earth company in southern China last week, state media reported, lifting the shares of producers on speculation that this indicated Beijing was considering using the chemicals in the U.S. trade war.
If Beijing do decide to play this card, it will be an obvious counter to recent US moves to embargo the export of certain semiconductors to China, and to orchestrate the expulsion of Huawei from supposedly independent industry bodies. In other words, two can play at this game.

China was the source of 80% of US rare earth element imports, and the US had excluded Chinese rare earths from tariffs.
China accounted for 80 per cent of rare earth imports between 2014 and 2017 by the United States, which has excluded them from recent tariffs along with some other critical Chinese minerals.

Beijing, however, has raised tariffs on imports of U.S. rare earth metal ores from 10 per cent to 25 per cent from June 1, making it less economical to process the material in China.
The US does mine some rare earths, but apparently they get refined in China. The Chinese have put a 25% tariff on American rare earth ores starting in June.
 
#64
Press reports say that the Chinese government are "seriously considering" restricting the export of rare earth elements to the US.
www.cbc.ca/news/business/china-us-rare-earths-1.5154338?cmp=rss


Beijing has not made any official comments on this, but a government official made comments that suggested they may adopt a policy which produces this effect even if it does not explicitly target the US.


And president Xi visited a rare earth company last week, causing increasing speculation that China may be thinking about the issue.


If Beijing do decide to play this card, it will be an obvious counter to recent US moves to embargo the export of certain semiconductors to China, and to orchestrate the expulsion of Huawei from supposedly independent industry bodies. In other words, two can play at this game.

China was the source of 80% of US rare earth element imports, and the US had excluded Chinese rare earths from tariffs.


The US does mine some rare earths, but apparently they get refined in China. The Chinese have put a 25% tariff on American rare earth ores starting in June.
More investment required in rare earth recovery perhaps. This is already an important area.
(PDF) Review on hydrometallurgical recovery of rare earth metals

China can’t control the market in rare earth elements because they aren’t all that rare

You can’t handle the truth (about rare earth elements)
By James Vincent Apr 17, 2018, 12:03pm EDT

"And although China seems to wield great power over this critical global supply chain, the truth is that the country can’t just bring the West to its knees by limiting exports of rare earth elements. We know this pretty conclusively because it tried this in 2010, and it didn’t work out. In both cases, the overlooked factor is just how difficult it is to produce rare earth elements, compared to how easy it is to find them"

China can’t control the market in rare earth elements because they aren’t all that rare
 
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#65
Press reports say that the Chinese government are "seriously considering" restricting the export of rare earth elements to the US.
www.cbc.ca/news/business/china-us-rare-earths-1.5154338?cmp=rss


Beijing has not made any official comments on this, but a government official made comments that suggested they may adopt a policy which produces this effect even if it does not explicitly target the US.


And president Xi visited a rare earth company last week, causing increasing speculation that China may be thinking about the issue.


If Beijing do decide to play this card, it will be an obvious counter to recent US moves to embargo the export of certain semiconductors to China, and to orchestrate the expulsion of Huawei from supposedly independent industry bodies. In other words, two can play at this game.

China was the source of 80% of US rare earth element imports, and the US had excluded Chinese rare earths from tariffs.


The US does mine some rare earths, but apparently they get refined in China. The Chinese have put a 25% tariff on American rare earth ores starting in June.
But then China gets labeled as a currency manipulator. And the tit for tat cycle gets really ugly. But the rare earth card or dumping US debt will only kill them in the long run.
 
#66
More investment required in rare earth recovery perhaps. This is already an important area.
(PDF) Review on hydrometallurgical recovery of rare earth metals

China can’t control the market in rare earth elements because they aren’t all that rare

You can’t handle the truth (about rare earth elements)
By James Vincent Apr 17, 2018, 12:03pm EDT

"And although China seems to wield great power over this critical global supply chain, the truth is that the country can’t just bring the West to its knees by limiting exports of rare earth elements. We know this pretty conclusively because it tried this in 2010, and it didn’t work out. In both cases, the overlooked factor is just how difficult it is to produce rare earth elements, compared to how easy it is to find them"

China can’t control the market in rare earth elements because they aren’t all that rare
The news story didn't say anything about limiting exports of rare earths to the "West", just to the US. That's a very different scenario. They could even just target specific US companies.

Yes there are rare earths to be found elsewhere in the world that the US could import, but they are more expensive. That would make US manufacturing less competitive, which sort of blows a hole in MAGA, at least so far as US electronics manufacturing would go. I can for example see the Mexicans laughing their arses off over the idea of the Americans facing higher manufacturing costs compared to Mexico after they have just finished ramming export quotas down the throat of Mexico as part of a supposed "free trade" deal.

So far the Chinese haven't said they are going to do anything of this sort. However, the message should be getting home to the US that the Chinese can do tit-for-tat to retaliate against US trying to hobble a whole list of Chinese companies (it has gone well beyond Huawei by this point) who have been very successful in various industry niches.

The thing to remember is that the US started this trade war, and they are waging it against everyone else, including Europe (and the UK), Japan, Canada, and Mexico. If the US find themselves on the short of the stick on this one, then they're on their own. And the reason they're on their own is because they declared (trade) war on the entire world.
 
#69
5G launched by EE in the UK today.The BBC outside broadcast van used Huawei antennae to demonstrate it ;-)

Chinese bogeyman gets Huawei with featuring in EE's 5G network launch thanks to bumbling BBC
It was also the first television broadcast over 5G. I'm not sure if they mean the first in the UK, or the first in the world.
Today marked the launch of Britain's first 5G network – and also, as the BBC joyously informed us, the first telly broadcast made over 5G.
And when someone noticed the Huawei logo on some of the kit, the BBC deleted the photo from their web site, but not before other people saved a copy.
Weirdly, the Beeb seemed to suffer a fit of embarrassment about its highlighting of the Chinese company's wares and shortly afterwards deleted its pictures – but not until sharp-eyed Reg commentard m0rt had alerted us to their existence. And without further ado, here's the proof.
 
#70
China have drawn up their own list of "unreliable entities" in apparent response to the American blacklist. If foreign companies, organisations, or individuals stop supplying Chinese companies for non-commercial reasons (e.g. due to the American blacklist), then their name will go on a list for action later.
www.cbc.ca/news/business/reports-that-huawei-cancelling-u-s-meetings-sending-home-american-employees-1.5157620?cmp=rss
China's commerce ministry announced Friday that it will establish its own list of foreign enterprises, organizations and individuals it deems to be "unreliable entities" — a possible response to the U.S. blacklist.

Entities are "unreliable" if they "fail to comply with market rules, break from the spirit of contracts and block or stop supplying Chinese enterprise for non-commercial reasons, seriously damaging the legitimate rights and interests of Chinese enterprises," ministry spokesman Gao Feng said at a news briefing.

Gao said the specific measures to be taken against the entities will be announced at a later date.
They can apparently play the "national security" card too.
The purpose of the list is to oppose unilateralism and trade protectionism, as well as safeguard China's national security, he said.
Huawei have apparently has cancelled meetings with Americans and sent home the numerous Americans working at their headquarters in China.
The Financial Times reported Friday that tech giant Huawei has ordered its employees to cancel technical meetings with American contacts and has sent home numerous U.S. employees working at its Chinese headquarters.
 
#71
China have drawn up their own list of "unreliable entities" in apparent response to the American blacklist. If foreign companies, organisations, or individuals stop supplying Chinese companies for non-commercial reasons (e.g. due to the American blacklist), then their name will go on a list for action later.
www.cbc.ca/news/business/reports-that-huawei-cancelling-u-s-meetings-sending-home-american-employees-1.5157620?cmp=rss


They can apparently play the "national security" card too.


Huawei have apparently has cancelled meetings with Americans and sent home the numerous Americans working at their headquarters in China.

Outrageous! Surely they're not refusing to bow the knee to the Donald?
 
#72
And in a related story, the China Computer Federation (CCF) has said they are suspending cooperation with the US IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers) Computer Society You go that way, we'll go Huawei: China Computer Federation kicks back at IEEE in tit-for-tat spat
The China Computer Federation (CCF) declared that it is suspending communications with the US-based Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers' Computer Society (IEEE CS), according to Reuters.
This is apparently in response to the IEEE prohibiting employees of Huawei from participating in certain IEEE activities. The IEEE apparently did so due to instructions from the US government.

The CCF said that while the IEEE was once considered to be an open and international academic organization, this action by the IEEE violates the principle of non-politicization.
In a post on China's WeChat platform, the CCF said the IEEE CS "was once considered an open international academic organization" before describing the Huawei ban as something which "seriously violates the open, equal and non-politicized nature of being an international academic organization".
 
#75
The co-founder of Arm, the British company whose CPU designs are in virtually every mobile phone and tablet, and which control large proportions of embedded kit including telecommunications gear said on Tuesday that the dispute has had an "absolutely enormous" effect on Arm. Arm is one of the pillars and great success stories of the UK high tech industry.
Huawei row will damage British tech giant ARM, says founder Hermann Hauser | This is Money
The row over Chinese firm Huawei will be 'incredibly damaging' for Arm, the founder of the British technology giant has claimed.

Cambridge-based computer chip designer Arm has been forced to suspend business with Huawei after President Trump placed the Chinese company on a US 'banned entity' list amid security concerns.
Hauser said that most of Arm's technology was created in Europe, but some of it came from the US. At the time they hadn't thought of the potential consequences, but now because of this they are subject to US instructions.
He said that included Arm. 'Most of Arm's intellectual property was created in Europe, but some of it, without thinking, we created in the US. Many Arm products have American intellectual property in them - Arm had to follow the instructions of the American president,' the 70-year-old added.
He said that while the current dispute is damaging to Huawei in the short term, in the long term this will be incredibly damaging to Arm and to American industry.
'It really is quite damaging for Huawei in the short term, and longterm it's going to be incredibly damaging for Arm and Google and the American industry,' he said.
Every single supplier in the world will start looking at how to reduce the threat of their production being shut down by the US. Hauser has been talking to companies in Europe who at this time are going through their products and designing out American intellectual property.
''Every single supplier in the world will start thinking of how to reduce the threat of their production being terminated by an American president. All the discussions I have with companies in Europe at the moment are about them going through their intellectual property portfolio and designing American intellectual property out, which is terribly sad and destructive.'
Hauser said that the current situation was "'not an acceptable position to be in for a non-American company".
Hauser, who is now co-founder and venture partner of technology start-up investor Amadeus Capital, said it was 'not an acceptable position to be in for a non-American company'.
He also said that if the US can stop a Chinese company, they can stop any other company in the world. Because of this companies around the world are now thinking that this is not a position they want to be in and are being very careful about buying American products.
Hauser added: 'If America can stop a Chinese company, of course they can stop any other company in the world. By exercising this incredible power they have over other companies, all the companies in the world are now thinking: "Do I want to be in a position where the American president can shut me down?" When I talk to people in the industry, they are being very careful about not buying American products.'
As a business manager, entrepreneur, technology pioneer, venture capitalist, and company director, Hermann Hauser (KBE, Phd in Physics at Cambridge, Fellow of the Royal Society, and many other achievements) is someone whose opinion is worth listening to. He is in a position to know what businesses around the world are thinking and doing, so what he has to say should be taken very seriously.
 
#76
Hermann Hauser - one of the gods of tech - Acorn, BBC Micro, RISC OS. He basically gave a generation of British kids the keys to the computing kingdom.
 
#77
Well, it made me laugh, particularly as it’s 30 years ago:
059ACA5B-E87B-4F4C-8A72-7638592B1685.jpeg
 
#78
The co-founder of Arm, the British company whose CPU designs are in virtually every mobile phone and tablet, and which control large proportions of embedded kit including telecommunications gear said on Tuesday that the dispute has had an "absolutely enormous" effect on Arm. Arm is one of the pillars and great success stories of the UK high tech industry.
Huawei row will damage British tech giant ARM, says founder Hermann Hauser | This is Money


Hauser said that most of Arm's technology was created in Europe, but some of it came from the US. At the time they hadn't thought of the potential consequences, but now because of this they are subject to US instructions.


He said that while the current dispute is damaging to Huawei in the short term, in the long term this will be incredibly damaging to Arm and to American industry.


Every single supplier in the world will start looking at how to reduce the threat of their production being shut down by the US. Hauser has been talking to companies in Europe who at this time are going through their products and designing out American intellectual property.


Hauser said that the current situation was "'not an acceptable position to be in for a non-American company".


He also said that if the US can stop a Chinese company, they can stop any other company in the world. Because of this companies around the world are now thinking that this is not a position they want to be in and are being very careful about buying American products.


As a business manager, entrepreneur, technology pioneer, venture capitalist, and company director, Hermann Hauser (KBE, Phd in Physics at Cambridge, Fellow of the Royal Society, and many other achievements) is someone whose opinion is worth listening to. He is in a position to know what businesses around the world are thinking and doing, so what he has to say should be taken very seriously.
Not just ARM. There is embedded FPGA technology in Huawei gear, that was developed by a US company that I used to work for. Their CEO is an absolute cnut, so I hope the export ban is absolutely crucifying him. All the staff there could walk into other jobs with the likes of Intel and Qualcomm, but if you've put all your eggs in one basket as the CEO, well... hahahahaha :)

I don't much like the cnut :)
 
#80

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