CVs

Discussion in 'Royal Signals' started by Airborne_Foggy, Mar 11, 2006.

Welcome to the Army Rumour Service, ARRSE

The UK's largest and busiest UNofficial military website.

The heart of the site is the forum area, including:

  1. Hello,

    I am having serious probs with my CV, is there there anyone out there who can give advice or point me in the right direction to producing a good quality CV. I am due to leave after 22 yrs service and ain't getting a great deal of help from the resettlement side. I am an IS Engineer and will be attempting to get civilian Quals from my resettlement. My biggest problem with the CV is putting 22 years of Army/Sigs experience into civi lingo.

    Regards

    Airborne_Foggy
     
  2. There are couple of ways to do it. Contact a couple of agencies who know how to deal with departing squaddies (resettlement office should be able to point in the direction of the right agencies , aerotek are well used to ex sigs) and ask them for advice, they are more than willing to help especially if it means they can get you on the books and get commission from finding you a job.

    The other way is to get in touch with mates who have already left and get theirs so you can compare. Im not sure what IS ops do as I left just as they were starting to introduced.
     
  3. CGS

    CGS War Hero Moderator

    Perhaps calling this thread CV's is an example of an area you may wish to brush up on when writing your CV?
     
  4. Airborne siggy - pm me we have a couple of jobs going at our place that you might be interested in
     
  5. The CV should be designed to get you the interview and the interview is what gets you the job. Look at what systems we are using and compare to what you are using and put the common bits in. The rest probably isn't relevant. Tailor the CV to each application, don't just send the same one to each (this is one of the downsides of using agencies).

    Personally, I ignore qualifications when looking at CVs - It's too easy to get MSXX or Cisco whatever and still be a muppet. I'm looking for evidence that they can do the job. The applicant won't know why our systems are designed how they are but that's OK. Might be a good idea to povide evidence that you could work it out.

    You have an advantage over us civs because I look for non techie stuff; reliability, puctuality, going the extra mile, do the job without me having to watch all the time. And be nice to our customers. Generally, ex forces are good at this and you will often get an interview because of it.

    Oh, and take note of CGS's comment too ;)

    Good luck,

    C
     
  6. Gents,

    This is the type of "Help" i have been up against, but thank you for all your comments and i have taken on board what has been said.

    Airborne_Foggy
     
  7. Definately agree with this. Every one ive spoken to since getting out has loved ex forces for these reasons. And the quals bit is especially true, CCNA etc are great courses but everyone is jumping on the bandwagon and employers know this. However it does prove your willingness and ability to learn.
     
  8. Sorry if I'm misinterpreting your comment, but it seems to me like you're saying that you do not welcome constructive criticism regarding basic grammar and punctuation? I'm probably way off the mark, but if that is the case then I'd be very surprised. I've always been a bit anally-retentive when it comes to spelling etc, but I reckon if I was an employer and I had two candidates who were very similar but one's CV showed a lack of attention to detail (including full stops, commas and apostrophes in the wrong place) then I'd have to assume that he or she wasn't putting in enough effort. Prior planning and preparation prevents piss poor performance and all that!

    CS
     
  9. There have been some excellent work books published by the army for the sgts exams. These work books cover punctuation, letter writing, english useage and one other that I can't remember. Your education office should have access to them and they are an invaluable tool to anybody who wishes to refresh or improve their literacy skills.

    There is also a superb book called "Eats, Shoots And Leaves" which cover correct punctuation.

    If anybody feels they would really benefit from some further teaching there is a local Learn Direct Centre in everytown in the country nearly, they will help you pass the equivalent to your GCSE - now called your Literacy Level 2 (same can be done for Numeracy). These are the people who advertise as the Gremlin busters on national TV etc. It's all confidential and free, you would be amazed at the people you meet, so please don't think it's full of "mongs" "retards" etc. Most of the learners are adults who need to improve a skill in order to improve at work or older people who went to work at 12 and now want to learn how to read a book to the grandkids.

    But can it please be noted that when people are already feeling a sensitive and they are coming from the same service as yourself that maybe they should be helped and supported rather than criticised in an unhelpful manner?

    Hope this is of some help :wink:
     
  10. By the way I am aware of my errors with capitilization etc in the post as I typed it quickly.

    I would be interested to see what ******** feels the need to comment on it now...............................
     
  11. There have been some excellent work books published by the army for the sgts exams. These work books cover punctuation, letter writing, english useage and one other that I can't remember. Your education office should have access to them and they are an invaluable tool to anybody who wishes to refresh or improve their literacy skills.

    There is also a superb book called "Eats, Shoots And Leaves" which cover correct punctuation.

    If anybody feels they would really benefit from some further teaching there is a local Learn Direct Centre in everytown in the country nearly, they will help you pass the equivalent to your GCSE - now called your Literacy Level 2 (same can be done for Numeracy). These are the people who advertise as the Gremlin busters on national TV etc. It's all confidential and free, you would be amazed at the people you meet, so please don't think it's full of "mongs" "retards" etc. Most of the learners are adults who need to improve a skill in order to improve at work or older people who went to work at 12 and now want to learn how to read a book to the grandkids.

    But can it please be noted that when people are already feeling a sensitive and they are coming from the same service as yourself that maybe they should be helped and supported rather than criticised in an unhelpful manner?

    Hope this is of some help :wink:
     
  12. Maybe the grammar error could also be put down to rushing and I think we should leave the apostrophe error alone and concentrate our efforts on helping the lad?
     
  13. I could be totally wrong (I may have had a few) but isn't IS Eng an new trade therefore making 22yrs of service as one impossible. Please correct if I am wrong.

    Also, something I do know for definate, you get (boring) resettlement training which shows you how to form a C.V. adn how to translate anything you did in the army into civvy terms. I got out through it after under 3 years so you will definately have to do it after 22.
     
  14. So the lad is a liar and is not very good with the pesky apostrophe!!! Where is the direction and help with your criticism? FGS men at least have the courtesy to address the question and not have the 'I could be wrong BUT' approach!

    Remember there has never been a monument or statue erected for a critic!
     
  15. Hello jest,

    Yes i am leaving the Army after 22 yrs service and i have been an IS Engineer since late 2000, it is a new trade within the Signals but previous to that i was an Systems Operator and Radio Telegraphist however my current trade is IS Engineer and this is the most current trade i have and wish to pursue in my civilian career.

    In case you are wondering the resettlement 3 day course did not tell me how to interpret my military background on my CV to civilian terminology but they did suggest that my military background must be put into civilian terminology.......great so how do I do that then? Luckily i have a good network of friends that have left the corps and a wonderful wife who has always worked in the civil sector.

    I did come here for further advice and assistance in the matter of CV writing yet get critised about "CV's" sheeeesh wish i was good at "england". All i can say is i was wrong for coming here for advice and disappointed with fellow Sigs who felt it was more important to make open ended criticism rather than helping constructively.

    By the way thank you to all those that provided intelligent and sensible answers to my question and putting punctuation aside, i thank you all.

    Airborne_Foggy

    'Airborne all the way, Maroon Machine'