CVF and Carrier Strike thread

I'm sure the lads on board will not be complaining about a night up the road in Singapore., if of course covid allows!
Singers has not been a positive run ashore for Jack recently.
 
I'm sure the lads on board will not be complaining about a night up the road in Singapore., if of course covid allows!
Will there be any "old hands" on board, to show the youngsters the night spots, appropriate areas . . . on the assumption, that these are still relevant ?!

Or will it be a case of confused, wasteful, random, exploration ?! ;) .
 
Since the Merlin helicopter has come up several times on this thread I thought the following story would be of interest.
RCAF’s CH-149 Cormorant Completes 100K Flight Hours, 20 Years After First Delivery

Canada has an SAR version it calls the CH-149 Cormorant. On the 11th of October the RCAF celebrated the 20th anniversary of it's service in Canada, with more than 100,000 flight hours so far. The article describes its service with Canada as "exemplary".

The fleet is getting a mid life upgrade to extend its service life out to 2042 and beyond.

The article includes the following map showing the approximate ferry route the helicopters took to get to Canada for initial delivery.

163430747761698d95cecbc.jpg
 
Singapore has changed out of any possible recognition to the old time navy. But it is still a pleasant, if pricey, run ashore.

There are still plenty of sailors bars in Singapore if you know where to look. Circular Road (one back from Boat Quay) comes alive in the evening and Orchard Towers (The Four Floors of Whores) has some interesting places. Lots of food and drink to be had along the river side if you don't want to go whoring. Clarke Quay is lively until the early hours Certainly not a cheap run ashore and not anything like it used to be but can still be a fun night.
 

Yokel

LE
The voices in my head made me click on this thread - I was trying to stay away.

@terminal - do you mind if I post that link in another thread? I can think of at least one poster who will not like that. The Merlin is key to the RN, including carrier operations.

@Not a Boffin and @jrwlynch - I seem to recall you telling the man with multiple user names that despite his insistence otherwise, the requirements for what became the QEC included air defence sorties for the defence of the task group/amphibious forces/logistic vessels. Would I be right in assuming that it would have also included launching ASW sorties for a similar task group defence role?
 
The voices in my head made me click on this thread - I was trying to stay away.

@terminal - do you mind if I post that link in another thread? I can think of at least one poster who will not like that. The Merlin is key to the RN, including carrier operations.

@Not a Boffin and @jrwlynch - I seem to recall you telling the man with multiple user names that despite his insistence otherwise, the requirements for what became the QEC included air defence sorties for the defence of the task group/amphibious forces/logistic vessels. Would I be right in assuming that it would have also included launching ASW sorties for a similar task group defence role?
You can post the link to the story wherever you want.
 
The voices in my head made me click on this thread - I was trying to stay away.

@terminal - do you mind if I post that link in another thread? I can think of at least one poster who will not like that. The Merlin is key to the RN, including carrier operations.

@Not a Boffin and @jrwlynch - I seem to recall you telling the man with multiple user names that despite his insistence otherwise, the requirements for what became the QEC included air defence sorties for the defence of the task group/amphibious forces/logistic vessels. Would I be right in assuming that it would have also included launching ASW sorties for a similar task group defence role?
I think man of a thousand user names is on ROPs again. It's been nice not having his pages of bullshit followed by people calling hist posts bullshit.
 
You can post the link to the story wherever you want.
It will save the rest of us, having to go looking for the link elsewhere !! ;) .
 

Yokel

LE
You can post the link to the story wherever you want.

I know - but politeness costs nothing.

A guy called Richard Beedall used to run a website called Navy Matters which was a reliable source of information on RN projects. I know he once had the Key User Requirements for the Type 45 destroyer listed, but cannot remember anything similar in his extensive section on CVF. Sortie rate was a KUR, but is the oft quoted 110 sorties per day just fixed wing sorties or dies it include ASW or other rotary wing ones?

If so, then that is another reason to be grateful for the extra range and endurance of Merlin compared to other ASW types. It amused me (well not amused really) to see him (TwatEx) arguing with @alfred_the_great over ASW operations and how to run things.

If Air Defence sorties were specified as part of the requirement, then it follows that ASW ones were too. @Not a Boffin and @jrwlynch are likely to know if ASW sorties were part of the KUR.

I get the feeling that the people who wrote the KURs were far more intelligent than they are credited with.

Edited to add: At least Twitter updates and things like this RN website article refer to "constantly supporting and protecting the carrier and the strike group". It is a shame that those who are not in the habit of thinking do not realise that this could include amphibious forces or logistic vessels being escorted by the CSG.

I look forward to exercises and operations in with the CSG is alongside things like amphibious assets, such as NAYO activities from 2022 onwards.
 
Last edited:

Yokel

LE
People read 'Carrier Strike' and think it means (ground) attack only! I have looked up the KURs for CVF/QEC, and there is no specific mention of ASW - or indeed Air Defence. However, this paper from a few years ago has an interesting definition of Carrier Enabled Power Projection...

Queen Elizabeth Class Carriers - Air Maritime Integration - Captain Nick Walker RN - August 2016

An integrated and sustainable joint capability, interoperable with NATO, that enables the projection of UK Carrier Strike and Littoral Manoeuvre power as well as delivering humanitarian assistance and defence diplomacy, enabling joint effect across the maritime, land and air environments at a time and place of political choosing.

Presumably this includes both Air Defence and ASW? The document also states that part of the C2 capability is to support ASW and that the magazine is designed for ASW weapons well as those for the jets.

Also - from page 14-3 of the US Naval Flight Surgeon's Manal - Third edition - 1991.

Six of the 15 currently commissioned carriers are CVN’s. All 15 support antisubmarine warfare (ASW) operations with at least one ASW helicopter squadron and a fixed wing ASW squadron aboard, as well as serving the more traditional roles of fleet air defense and attack missions (bombing). Most carrier air wings (CVW’s) are configured with nine squadrons and a detachment of photo reconnaissance aircraft. Carriers defend themselves with their speed (in excess of 28 knots), with missile batteries of surface-to-surface and surface-to-air missiles (point defense), and with the extended umbrella of carrier air wing fighters performing barrier or force combat air patrols (BARCAP and FORECAP) at some distance from the ship.

Configured as an attack ASW carrier, the various missions of the aircraft carrier become more apparent. Conceptually, the carrier encompasses both tactical and strategic defensive and offensive capabilities. Offensively, it can wage conventional or nuclear war or deter such warfare by its presence. It attracts military attention wherever it goes, thus diverting potential military offensive resources that could be employed elsewhere. It serves as an integrating vehicle for surface warships in company, aircraft deployed overhead, and attack submarines working below. Combining the advantages of each of the air, surface, and subsurface capabilities, threats can be neutralized quickly to both tactical and strategic advantage. This three-dimensional coverage for fleet offense and defense, coupled with modern electronic hardware and software technology, provides an unparalleled tactical and strategic capability.


Think how much communications and computer technology has advanced since 1991, and how low frequency active sonar has changed the frigate/ASW helicopter relationship.
 

Yokel

LE
Now what was I saying about 'Carrier Strike' or 'Attack Carrier' not meaning that every sortie is offensive, and about air defence and ASW being on the agenda (and flying programme)?

30 live interceptions of armed Russian jets during carrier group aircraft operations in the Mediterranean

On 12th June two F-35 Jets flying from HMS Queen Elizabeth took off to conduct missions against Daesh in Syria and Iraq. This was the first strike mission from a Royal Navy vessel since the operations in Libya during 2011. In a two-week period, there were 30 live intercepts of armed Russian fighter and bomber aircraft. Sukhois and Migs came within visual range of aircraft flying from the ship. Moorhouse added that two jets were held at readiness on deck during this period, ready to respond to any Russian air incursions or overlights. The critical importance for the fleet to have its own organic air cover available for all kinds of naval operations is often overlooked as the main focus is on the strike element of carrier capability.

In the underwater domain, the Commodore noted that the carrier-based Merlin Mk2 ASW helicopters worked with his frigates (and probably with supporting SSN, HMS Ambush) to “locate and fix the Russian submarines deployed to welcome us”.
 
Last edited:

Latest Threads

Top