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CVF and Carrier Strike thread

Just wondering.

Airborne Electronic Attack (AEA) involves offensive and defensive suppression of an enemy’s electromagnetic spectrum, including radars and communications. It includes the ability to monitor hostile electromagnetic activity, and evaluate, disrupt, manipulate, or even disable the related systems that form part of an Integrated Air Defence System (IADS), which collects tracking data and disseminates it to “shooters,” such as surface-to-air missile sites, that tackle upcoming threats. The ability to confuse, suppress or disable enemy IADS means its engagement ability can be seriously degraded or parts of it wiped out.

At present this is the job of the EA-18G Growler, the USN’s most advanced airborne electronic attack (AEA) aircraft. Operating either from carriers or land-bases it was developed as a replacement for the US Navy EA-6B Prowler aircraft that retired in March 2019. Not sure what the UK equivalent is...or if we have one.

A derivative of the two-seat F/A-18 Hornet, its primary mission is electronic attack (EA) and suppression of enemy air defences (SEAD), at the start and ongoing early stages of hostilities. With 11 weapon stations for carrying electronic mission systems and weapons it can then revert to conventional strike missions when requirements for EA and SEAD sorties are reduced


One school of thought feels that the F-35B is fully capable of blocking signals itself and questions paring the two aircraft in tandem, since the Growler is not a stealth aircraft and its presence could alert enemies. Others feel that the F-35 needs support from an aircraft that can block signals across the electromagnetic threat spectrum and which can also block signals while moving away from targets, as the Growler can.

A question this raises with the present aircraft strike group on the QE. Is there a role for a specialised ‘Growler’ F-35’s, if there is one? Will this capability be provided/available for offensive ops from the QE? Is it envisaged that they will be able to do without?
 
Just wondering.

Airborne Electronic Attack (AEA) involves offensive and defensive suppression of an enemy’s electromagnetic spectrum, including radars and communications. It includes the ability to monitor hostile electromagnetic activity, and evaluate, disrupt, manipulate, or even disable the related systems that form part of an Integrated Air Defence System (IADS), which collects tracking data and disseminates it to “shooters,” such as surface-to-air missile sites, that tackle upcoming threats. The ability to confuse, suppress or disable enemy IADS means its engagement ability can be seriously degraded or parts of it wiped out.

At present this is the job of the EA-18G Growler, the USN’s most advanced airborne electronic attack (AEA) aircraft. Operating either from carriers or land-bases it was developed as a replacement for the US Navy EA-6B Prowler aircraft that retired in March 2019. Not sure what the UK equivalent is...or if we have one.

A derivative of the two-seat F/A-18 Hornet, its primary mission is electronic attack (EA) and suppression of enemy air defences (SEAD), at the start and ongoing early stages of hostilities. With 11 weapon stations for carrying electronic mission systems and weapons it can then revert to conventional strike missions when requirements for EA and SEAD sorties are reduced


One school of thought feels that the F-35B is fully capable of blocking signals itself and questions paring the two aircraft in tandem, since the Growler is not a stealth aircraft and its presence could alert enemies. Others feel that the F-35 needs support from an aircraft that can block signals across the electromagnetic threat spectrum and which can also block signals while moving away from targets, as the Growler can.

A question this raises with the present aircraft strike group on the QE. Is there a role for a specialised ‘Growler’ F-35’s, if there is one? Will this capability be provided/available for offensive ops from the QE? Is it envisaged that they will be able to do without?
The answer you are looking for is classified. One point to consider is that the USN has a mixed fleet of F18 and F35, so it would be sensible to have EW protection for non 5th gen aircraft.

While the RAF/RN Carrier strike is all 5th gen.
 
Just wondering.

Airborne Electronic Attack (AEA) involves offensive and defensive suppression of an enemy’s electromagnetic spectrum, including radars and communications. It includes the ability to monitor hostile electromagnetic activity, and evaluate, disrupt, manipulate, or even disable the related systems that form part of an Integrated Air Defence System (IADS), which collects tracking data and disseminates it to “shooters,” such as surface-to-air missile sites, that tackle upcoming threats. The ability to confuse, suppress or disable enemy IADS means its engagement ability can be seriously degraded or parts of it wiped out.

At present this is the job of the EA-18G Growler, the USN’s most advanced airborne electronic attack (AEA) aircraft. Operating either from carriers or land-bases it was developed as a replacement for the US Navy EA-6B Prowler aircraft that retired in March 2019. Not sure what the UK equivalent is...or if we have one.

A derivative of the two-seat F/A-18 Hornet, its primary mission is electronic attack (EA) and suppression of enemy air defences (SEAD), at the start and ongoing early stages of hostilities. With 11 weapon stations for carrying electronic mission systems and weapons it can then revert to conventional strike missions when requirements for EA and SEAD sorties are reduced


One school of thought feels that the F-35B is fully capable of blocking signals itself and questions paring the two aircraft in tandem, since the Growler is not a stealth aircraft and its presence could alert enemies. Others feel that the F-35 needs support from an aircraft that can block signals across the electromagnetic threat spectrum and which can also block signals while moving away from targets, as the Growler can.

A question this raises with the present aircraft strike group on the QE. Is there a role for a specialised ‘Growler’ F-35’s, if there is one? Will this capability be provided/available for offensive ops from the QE? Is it envisaged that they will be able to do without?
Are you asking the RN to show you their growler?
 
The answer you are looking for is classified. One point to consider is that the USN has a mixed fleet of F18 and F35, so it would be sensible to have EW protection for non 5th gen aircraft.

While the RAF/RN Carrier strike is all 5th gen.
@Resasi This probably goes some way to answering the question:

“F-35s have EW suites that can detect emissions from radars and other threats, classify and geolocate them, and then distribute threat data to other aircraft. They can also perform active EW tasks such as standoff jamming of airborne and surface threats. Their active electronically scanned array (AESA) radars can also conduct electronic attacks,” he explained.

 

Yokel

LE
Why not worry about the basics first?


Her first NATO (and national) mission - one of many. Peace through strength.



The value of a larger ship and a larger deck is obvious from this picture.


Look at the way it lands so smoothly compared with Sea Harrier and Harrier GR7/9. In Sea Harrier Over The Falklands, Sharkey Ward said he hoped that the successor to the Sea Harrier would be easier to land. Well - here it is, with fifth generation avionics and LO. Both air defence (controlled by a shipborne Freddy) and attack have been part of this exercise.


In future the number of F-35B (are we officially calling it the Lightning?) will increase, operated by the joint RN/RAF force (recent window licking over this has been seen - from Peter 'Ignore The Science' Hitchens, and with be supported by Crowsnest. The air to air capability will hopefully be enhanced by Meteor. With The US looking to build light fleet carriers based on the America class LHD, so maybe it will be getting some sort of anti ship weapon integrated?


However, it is not all about the jets. The Pingers contribute to task group ASW capabilities and work with the frigates and their helicopters, and the Junglies do their stuff. The Junglies can relieve the Pingers of much SAR/VERTREP/HDS tasking. Co-ordinated ASW was part of this exercise.
 
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The QE cross decking with the USMC F-35’s is a real twofer. The USMC has probably got the most operational F-35 experience both ashore and from her 'Lightning carriers’ which they bring to the QE deck. They will get intensive ops with an ally over a decent period of time.

The US/USN/USMC will also get a good long look at the reduced manning ops of QE and what might be gained from ‘slimmed down’ carriers as opposed to their very costly super carriers...or even the USMC’s America class carriers, in a real time scenario.


At present the maintenance periods required to catch up on the US Navy’s extended carrier ops that have been ongoing for the last few years, will probably be creating a shortage ahead. Certainly of their stated aims of carrier availability in the near future, and, available budgets may not support building more super carriers.

the future is our model....

’....
Under Defense Secretary Mark Esper's "Battleforce 2045" plan unveiled earlier this month, the Navy's fleet would expand from nearly 300 ships now to 500 -- both manned and unmanned -- with a major shift in the strategic use of aircraft carriers.

The plan calls for a possible reduction in the number of "supercarriers" of the Ford and Nimitz classes to eight -- down from today's 11 -- and more reliance on a new class of smaller amphibious warships equipped with drones.

Gilday also has a new term for amphibs.

"Light carriers might more aptly be named the 'aviation combatant of the future,'" he said. "The time range here is 2045 so, whether or not an aviation platform of the future looks like the Gerald R. Ford or the Nimitz class -- that's questionable."

 
@Resasi This probably goes some way to answering the question:
Thanks, yes, confirmation of capabilities i thought it probably did have, ie offensive avionic countermeasures in addition to other capabilities.

One thing to evade and slip past, but offensive jamming and active strike, is to announce one’s presence.

But then seriously useful as a stealthy jammer which is part of a 5th gen strike group, or even a 5th and 4.5/4th follow up group.

The upcoming build-up of 5th Gen in the S China Sea area must be a serious headache for the CCP’s ambitions in that area.
 
The CCP, is probably seriously concerned about the proliferation of 5th gen Naval aviation assets in the S China Sea area, and conscious of the shortcomings of it own Naval Air sitting ducks, the J-15’s. It may be building carriers but without effective aircraft they are pretty toothless.

It now seems to be focussing on an answer to the F-35B's with is own knock off version, the FC-31.


While true that form follows function, in China’s case it is espionage and cyber theft. Fortunately they and the Russians still lag in engine technology.
 
Published by: Tom Cotterill, The NEWS, portsmouth.co.uk, Saturday 17 October 2020.

Royal Navy: F-35 stealth jets from HMS Queen Elizabeth fire laser-guided bombs at small island in historic first.

THIS is the moment a laser-guided bomb fired from an F-35B detonated as pilots blasted a small island on a live attack run.


The explosive display of deadly power took place on Garvie Island, a small rocky outcrop off Cape Wrate at the north-west tip of Scotland, during an exercise with HMS Queen Elizabeth.

Two 500lb paveway bombs, dropped by US Marine Corps pilots operating from the Portsmouth-based aircraft carrier, smashed into the island, which has a similar dimension to a capital warship.

And directing the huge explosives for the first time were aviators from 847 Naval Air Squadron operating in a Wildcat helicopter.

Lieutenant Dom Savage acted as the airborne forward air controller, directing the stealth jets of Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 211 to the target.

Working hand-in-hand with the Wildcat crew was a specialist commando unit, 148 (Meiktila) Battery Royal Artillery, who ‘paint’ the target – pointing a laser beam at it for the bomb to aim at.

‘The opportunity to drop live ordnance from F-35Bs hasn’t happened before, so to be a part of the first live control is a privilege,’ said Lt Savage.

The bombing run was not the only piece of explosive training the fliers of 847 Squadron were involved in during the exercise in Scotland.

Four 847 Wildcat Pilots were qualified as ‘air observation posts’ working with 29 Commando Royal Artillery L118 Light Guns to bring 77 105mm high-explosive rounds crashing down on the Cape, assisted by the Wildcat’s enhanced targeting suite.

The training in Scotland – part of the latest Joint Warrior exercise hosted by the UK’s armed forces.

The drills saw HMS Queen Elizabeth leading a carrier strike group in the region as they carried out manoeuvres and naval gun fire exercises.

The team from 847 is the only helicopter squadron in the UK military’s inventory capable of acting as spotters for ground-based and naval gunfire and calling in air strikes.

They will accompany the £3.2bn aircraft carrier when she deploys early next year on her maiden operational mission, alongside F-35 jets from the RAF and US Marine Corps.

1603056863230.png

[photo: Another 500lb laser-guided bomb exploding as it hits small island off the Scottish coast. Photo: Royal Navy].

 
Published by: Tom Cotterill, The NEWS, portsmouth.co.uk, Saturday 17 October 2020.

Royal Navy: F-35 stealth jets from HMS Queen Elizabeth fire laser-guided bombs at small island in historic first.

THIS is the moment a laser-guided bomb fired from an F-35B detonated as pilots blasted a small island on a live attack run.

The explosive display of deadly power took place on Garvie Island, a small rocky outcrop off Cape Wrate at the north-west tip of Scotland, during an exercise with HMS Queen Elizabeth.

Two 500lb paveway bombs, dropped by US Marine Corps pilots operating from the Portsmouth-based aircraft carrier, smashed into the island, which has a similar dimension to a capital warship.

And directing the huge explosives for the first time were aviators from 847 Naval Air Squadron operating in a Wildcat helicopter.

Lieutenant Dom Savage acted as the airborne forward air controller, directing the stealth jets of Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 211 to the target.

Working hand-in-hand with the Wildcat crew was a specialist commando unit, 148 (Meiktila) Battery Royal Artillery, who ‘paint’ the target – pointing a laser beam at it for the bomb to aim at.

‘The opportunity to drop live ordnance from F-35Bs hasn’t happened before, so to be a part of the first live control is a privilege,’ said Lt Savage.

The bombing run was not the only piece of explosive training the fliers of 847 Squadron were involved in during the exercise in Scotland.

Four 847 Wildcat Pilots were qualified as ‘air observation posts’ working with 29 Commando Royal Artillery L118 Light Guns to bring 77 105mm high-explosive rounds crashing down on the Cape, assisted by the Wildcat’s enhanced targeting suite.

The training in Scotland – part of the latest Joint Warrior exercise hosted by the UK’s armed forces.

The drills saw HMS Queen Elizabeth leading a carrier strike group in the region as they carried out manoeuvres and naval gun fire exercises.

The team from 847 is the only helicopter squadron in the UK military’s inventory capable of acting as spotters for ground-based and naval gunfire and calling in air strikes.

They will accompany the £3.2bn aircraft carrier when she deploys early next year on her maiden operational mission, alongside F-35 jets from the RAF and US Marine Corps.

View attachment 513265
[photo: Another 500lb laser-guided bomb exploding as it hits small island off the Scottish coast. Photo: Royal Navy].

Great story, but did the island show any hostile intent and with that accuracy wouldn't they have been better aiming at the Scottish Assembly when Queen Nicola and the SNP were in session? Just a suggestion.
 
According to an unofficial but generally well informed souce, the French navy's new generation carrier (PANG) will be nuclear powered.

The decision was taken by the French Pdt IOT secure the national nuclear R&D and know-how.

 

aardvark64

War Hero
Isn't that what 'working up' and sea trials are for anyway, finding snags and problems to fix before the tub goes off on a jolly?
 
In many ways, "meh". Leaks and small floods are a fact of life at sea.
"The latest leak is thought to have been caused by faulty pipework rather than a hull breach.

A source said it caused a “free flood” in a large compartment used to house electrical circuit boards and control panels.

"The engineering on the big pipes is questionable," a source said".
 
"A source" - aka we made it up.....

ETA : The statement on pipework engineering, not the fact it got a bit wet.
 
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Published by: Tom Dunlop, UK Defence Journal, on 23 October 2020.

US, Royal Navy sign agreement on ‘Integrated Warfighting’.

U.S Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Mike Gilday conducted a bilateral Strategic Dialogue via video teleconference with the First Sea Lord this week.

The leaders discussed the two navies’ alliance and areas for continued collaboration and cooperation around the globe.

Additionally, the two leaders signed a Statement of Intent for ‘Future Integrated Warfighting’ that will set a “cooperative vision for inter-changeability between the two navies, synchronize pioneering capabilities, strengthen operating concepts, and focus our collective efforts to Deliver Combined Seapower, together”.

“We have a long tradition of sailing together from the Atlantic to the Indo-Pacific. No doubt, our storied past has strengthened our friendship today, and will do so far into the future,” said Gilday.

“After months of hard work on both sides of the Atlantic, we are pleased to sign this Statement of Intent that will set a cooperative vision for interchangeability. By organizing our cooperation together on Carrier Strike, Underwater Superiority, Navy-Marine integration as well as future warfighting efforts like unmanned and AI, we will remain on the leading edge of Great Power Competition.”

Radakin echoed similar sentiments.

“In an increasingly contested world, alliances and partnerships such as that between the U.K. and the U.S. are vital,” said Radakin.

“We have already proven how closely we can work together, from developing our carrier strike capability to jointly demonstrating freedom of navigation around the world. Now, as we move towards every greater interchangeability, I am excited by the opportunities to strengthen and deepen our partnership today and in the years to come.”

The U.S. Navy and Royal Navy regularly operate together around the world. Most recently, the USS The Sullivans took part in the Royal Navy’s Carrier Strike Group exercise and Joint Warrior 20-2.

The two navies also conducted training in the Barents Sea in early September.

1603540229967.png



Also posted on the more general "All Inter-web video and links" thread
 
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Published by: Tom Dunlop, UK Defence Journal, on 23 October 2020.

US, Royal Navy sign agreement on ‘Integrated Warfighting’.

U.S Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Mike Gilday conducted a bilateral Strategic Dialogue via video teleconference with the First Sea Lord this week.

The leaders discussed the two navies’ alliance and areas for continued collaboration and cooperation around the globe.

Additionally, the two leaders signed a Statement of Intent for ‘Future Integrated Warfighting’ that will set a “cooperative vision for inter-changeability between the two navies, synchronize pioneering capabilities, strengthen operating concepts, and focus our collective efforts to Deliver Combined Seapower, together”.

“We have a long tradition of sailing together from the Atlantic to the Indo-Pacific. No doubt, our storied past has strengthened our friendship today, and will do so far into the future,” said Gilday.

“After months of hard work on both sides of the Atlantic, we are pleased to sign this Statement of Intent that will set a cooperative vision for interchangeability. By organizing our cooperation together on Carrier Strike, Underwater Superiority, Navy-Marine integration as well as future warfighting efforts like unmanned and AI, we will remain on the leading edge of Great Power Competition.”

Radakin echoed similar sentiments.

“In an increasingly contested world, alliances and partnerships such as that between the U.K. and the U.S. are vital,” said Radakin.

“We have already proven how closely we can work together, from developing our carrier strike capability to jointly demonstrating freedom of navigation around the world. Now, as we move towards every greater interchangeability, I am excited by the opportunities to strengthen and deepen our partnership today and in the years to come.”

The U.S. Navy and Royal Navy regularly operate together around the world. Most recently, the USS The Sullivans took part in the Royal Navy’s Carrier Strike Group exercise and Joint Warrior 20-2.

The two navies also conducted training in the Barents Sea in early September.

View attachment 514650


Also posted on the more general "All Inter-web video and links" thread
The USN gets all warm an fuzzy when a T45 escorts the CVF.
 

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