CVF and Carrier Strike thread

SAFRAN have offered to help them out with the engine, but the Indians are in shock over the price tag. The problem is India are trying to do jet engine development on the cheap, and it isn't working out.
 
The big boys ( GE, PW, RR, CFM etc )put millions and millions into developing jet engines and they have the advantage that they can leverage on whats gone before. The Indians don't have that luxury. Everything they do must be developed in house or licensed.
 
 
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NPR Choice page

U.S. Navy To Name Aircraft Carrier After WWII Hero Doris Miller



he U.S. Navy says it will name an aircraft carrier after Doris "Dorie" Miller, the African American mess attendant who heroically leapt into combat during the bombing of Pearl Harbor. It marks the first time that an aircraft carrier has been named for an African American, and the first time a sailor has been so honored for actions taken as an enlisted man.

In 1941, Miller was a 22-year-old mess attendant on the USS West Virginia. At the time, black sailors were consigned to roles in the messman branch — work that entailed swabbing decks, cooking and shining officers' shoes.

He had awoken at 6 a.m. and was collecting laundry when the Japanese attack began and an alarm sounded on the ship, according to the Navy. Miller headed to the antiaircraft battery magazine, but it had already been destroyed by torpedo damage. He proceeded to the deck, where he was assigned to carry his wounded comrades, including the ship's captain. Miller was strong: a former high school football player in Waco, Texas, he was the ship's heavyweight boxing champion.

"Miller went topside, carried wounded on his shoulders, made several trips up and down, wading through waist-deep water, oil-slicked decks, struggling uphill on slick decks," Navy Rear Adm. John Fuller said in 2016.

The young sailor then took over a .50-caliber anti-aircraft machine gun and fired it until the ammunition ran out. No matter that he'd never been trained on the weapon.

"It wasn't hard," he remembered, according to a Navy history. "I just pulled the trigger and she worked fine. I had watched the others with these guns. I guess I fired her for about 15 minutes. I think I got one of those [Japanese] planes. They were diving pretty close to us."

The ship's communications officer, Lt. Cmdr. Doir C. Johnson, said that Miller was "blazing away as though he had fired one all his life," according to the Navy Times.

The West Virginia was heavily damaged in the attack. Japanese planes had dropped armored bombs and launched multiple torpedoes on the vessel. The ship slowly sank, and more than 100 of the men aboard the ship died that day.



For his bravery, Miller was presented with the Navy Cross in May 1942. He was the first black sailor to be awarded the medal, one of the Navy's highest honors.

"This marks the first time in this conflict that such high tribute has been made in the Pacific Fleet to a member of his race and I'm sure that the future will see others similarly honored for brave acts," Adm. Chester Nimitz, the commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet, said at the time.

Miller had won renown, and he was brought home in November 1942 for a two-month tour to promote war bonds. His image was used on a Navy recruiting poster.

He did not survive the war. Miller was aboard the USS Liscome Bay when it was struck by a Japanese torpedo in the Pacific in 1943. Nearly 650 of the more than 900 sailors on board died when the ship sank, and Miller's body was never recovered.

He was posthumously awarded a Purple Heart, among other honors.

Shortly after Miller's death, the Navy began a small officer-training program for black sailors. In March 1944, the Navy commissioned its first black officers, known as the Golden Thirteen.

By naming the aircraft carrier for Miller, says Acting Secretary of the Navy Thomas B. Modly, "we honor the contributions of all our enlisted ranks, past and present, men and women, of every race, religion and background. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. observed, 'Everybody can be great — because anybody can serve'. No one understands the importance and true meaning of service than those who have volunteered to put the needs of others above themselves."

"Doris Miller stood for everything that is good about our nation," said Modly, "and his story deserves to be remembered and repeated wherever our people continue the watch today."
 
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soleil

Old-Salt
Portsmouth News: "RN Suffers 'Embarrassing' Fault With HMS Queen Elizabeth That Delayed UK Sea Trials Of F-35"

"Royal Navy supercarrier HMS Queen Elizabeth suffered a mechanical fault which delayed her latest bout of tests with Britain’s new state-of-the-art stealth jet, The News has learned.

The 65,000-tonne aircraft carrier was meant to set sail from Portsmouth on Tuesday morning, with the Royal Navy confirming the departure the night before.

But navy top brass scrapped the £3.1bn behemoth’s movement two hours after it was announced on Twitter. The ship eventually departed on Friday morning.

Officials from Portsmouth Naval Base gave no explanation for the unexpected cancellation when quizzed by The News, insisting the Senior Service would not ‘discuss’ the ship’s programme ‘in detail’.

Now, sources on the naval base have claimed a mechanical fault with the warship’s huge generators was to blame.

The issue is the latest to plague the 280m-long aircraft carrier, which last year suffered from a fault in her electric drive just days before a major flood forced the ship to head back to Portsmouth for repairs.

Vice Admiral Bob Cooling, who was in charge of Britain’s last operational aircraft carrier HMS Illustrious, was shocked by the news.

He said: ‘This is embarrassing for the Royal Navy. It’s becoming a feature of 21st century warships, which are more unreliable than 20th century ones.

‘The whole point about an aircraft carrier is that they need to be able to sail at very short notice.

‘To not be able to get to sea because you have got a mechanical failure is very unusual.’

However, retired Commodore Adrian Whyntie, a senior weapons engineering specialist, downplayed the situation and insisted the latest fault was ‘nothing to worry about’.

‘This is absolutely normal,’ the veteran naval officer of Titchfield told The News. ‘With my experience bringing ships out of build, you want the faults to appear now.

‘A car manufacturer will do exhaustive tests on loads of prototype vehicles before they’re ever manufactured. You can’t do that with a warship like this.’

He added: ‘If I had been on board a new warship and nothing went wrong, I would be very, very worried.’

As revealed by The News, Queen Elizabeth ‘lost all propulsion’ for several hours in June, forcing her to anchor off Britannia Royal Naval College for 24 hours while repairs were carried out.

The ship spent an extended period at anchor near Plymouth where further investigations were carried out.

Labour’s shadow defence procurement minister, Stephen Morgan said ‘teething’ problems were to be expected.

But demanding action, the Portsmouth South MP said: ‘When it comes to our national security and the operational capability of our troops, there can be no room for failure.

‘It is imperative that a close eye is kept so that teething issues do not stray into operational failings.’

The ship is now set to spend several weeks at sea carrying out the first trials with the feared fighter jet in UK waters.

Speaking last week about why Queen Elizabeth’s delay, a navy spokeswoman said: ‘HMS Queen Elizabeth did not sail today. This will not affect her training programme. We do not discuss ship’s programmes in detail and all ship’s movements are subject to change.’

The News has approached the navy for further comment."

https://www.portsmouth.co.uk/news/defence/royal-navy-suffers-embarrassing-fault-hms-queen-elizabeth-delayed-uk-sea-trials-f-35-1377038
 
Portsmouth News: "RN Suffers 'Embarrassing' Fault With HMS Queen Elizabeth That Delayed UK Sea Trials Of F-35"

"Royal Navy supercarrier HMS Queen Elizabeth suffered a mechanical fault which delayed her latest bout of tests with Britain’s new state-of-the-art stealth jet, The News has learned.

The 65,000-tonne aircraft carrier was meant to set sail from Portsmouth on Tuesday morning, with the Royal Navy confirming the departure the night before.

But navy top brass scrapped the £3.1bn behemoth’s movement two hours after it was announced on Twitter. The ship eventually departed on Friday morning.

Officials from Portsmouth Naval Base gave no explanation for the unexpected cancellation when quizzed by The News, insisting the Senior Service would not ‘discuss’ the ship’s programme ‘in detail’.

Now, sources on the naval base have claimed a mechanical fault with the warship’s huge generators was to blame.

The issue is the latest to plague the 280m-long aircraft carrier, which last year suffered from a fault in her electric drive just days before a major flood forced the ship to head back to Portsmouth for repairs.

Vice Admiral Bob Cooling, who was in charge of Britain’s last operational aircraft carrier HMS Illustrious, was shocked by the news.

He said: ‘This is embarrassing for the Royal Navy. It’s becoming a feature of 21st century warships, which are more unreliable than 20th century ones.

‘The whole point about an aircraft carrier is that they need to be able to sail at very short notice.

‘To not be able to get to sea because you have got a mechanical failure is very unusual.’

However, retired Commodore Adrian Whyntie, a senior weapons engineering specialist, downplayed the situation and insisted the latest fault was ‘nothing to worry about’.

‘This is absolutely normal,’ the veteran naval officer of Titchfield told The News. ‘With my experience bringing ships out of build, you want the faults to appear now.

‘A car manufacturer will do exhaustive tests on loads of prototype vehicles before they’re ever manufactured. You can’t do that with a warship like this.’

He added: ‘If I had been on board a new warship and nothing went wrong, I would be very, very worried.’

As revealed by The News, Queen Elizabeth ‘lost all propulsion’ for several hours in June, forcing her to anchor off Britannia Royal Naval College for 24 hours while repairs were carried out.

The ship spent an extended period at anchor near Plymouth where further investigations were carried out.

Labour’s shadow defence procurement minister, Stephen Morgan said ‘teething’ problems were to be expected.

But demanding action, the Portsmouth South MP said: ‘When it comes to our national security and the operational capability of our troops, there can be no room for failure.

‘It is imperative that a close eye is kept so that teething issues do not stray into operational failings.’

The ship is now set to spend several weeks at sea carrying out the first trials with the feared fighter jet in UK waters.

Speaking last week about why Queen Elizabeth’s delay, a navy spokeswoman said: ‘HMS Queen Elizabeth did not sail today. This will not affect her training programme. We do not discuss ship’s programmes in detail and all ship’s movements are subject to change.’

The News has approached the navy for further comment."

Royal Navy suffers 'embarrassing' fault with HMS Queen Elizabeth that delayed UK sea trials of F-35
Isn't that normal? When commissioning a brand new complicated platform? Across the world? The list of initial hitches in any country runs long. Non-story, really.
 
Isn't that normal? When commissioning a brand new complicated platform? Across the world? The list of initial hitches in any country runs long. Non-story, really.
Yes but we like to be overly critical of ourselves in this regard. Tsk, 3.1 Billion spent and it cant even leave on time, typical British engineering project, just like the trains


I was more disappointed by the absence of a deck full of shiny new f35's with that new car smell. I wish they would hurry up and get ours delivered.
 
Yes but we like to be overly critical of ourselves in this regard. Tsk, 3.1 Billion spent and it cant even leave on time, typical British engineering project, just like the trains


I was more disappointed by the absence of a deck full of shiny new f35's with that new car smell. I wish they would hurry up and get ours delivered.
Relax buddy - it's not deliveroo with a 30min or less delivery time...some things take a bit of time.
 
Yes but we like to be overly critical of ourselves in this regard. Tsk, 3.1 Billion spent and it cant even leave on time, typical British engineering project, just like the trains


I was more disappointed by the absence of a deck full of shiny new f35's with that new car smell. I wish they would hurry up and get ours delivered.
A lot already are, that's why it sailed on Friday, to do flying in the North Sea with the aircraft from RAF Marham.
 
Yes but we like to be overly critical of ourselves in this regard. Tsk, 3.1 Billion spent and it cant even leave on time, typical British engineering project, just like the trains


I was more disappointed by the absence of a deck full of shiny new f35's with that new car smell. I wish they would hurry up and get ours delivered.
Where are you getting your news from? Last year or the year before? F-35 will not be deployed permanently on board.
 
Yes but we like to be overly critical of ourselves in this regard. Tsk, 3.1 Billion spent and it cant even leave on time, typical British engineering project, just like the trains


I was more disappointed by the absence of a deck full of shiny new f35's with that new car smell. I wish they would hurry up and get ours delivered.
Ditto the rotary wing element. Pretty much an SOP for any country which operates carriers - the Air Wing (or equivalent) flies off before the vessel berths.

Sent from my SM-G973F using Tapatalk
 
Ditto the rotary wing element. Pretty much an SOP for any country which operates carriers - the Air Wing (or equivalent) flies off before the vessel berths.

Sent from my SM-G973F using Tapatalk
Except last time Elizabeth came home, with an F35 onboard and it flew off from the carrier in dock at Portsmouth which raised some eyebrows where I live as it flew over :)
 
Except last time Elizabeth came home, with an F35 onboard and it flew off from the carrier in dock at Portsmouth which raised some eyebrows where I live as it flew over :)
Because it had gone tits up stateside and was easier to bring back and repair in UK before launching for Marham. Didn't hurt PW-wise either, but not SOP.
 
Because it had gone tits up stateside and was easier to bring back and repair in UK before launching for Marham. Didn't hurt PW-wise either, but not SOP.
Canopy replacement :) No I know it's not standard, despite some people in this military themed forum (who should know better) thinking the carriers are fitted for and equipped with aircraft ;-)
 
Except last time Elizabeth came home, with an F35 onboard and it flew off from the carrier in dock at Portsmouth which raised some eyebrows where I live as it flew over :)
Caused a right bloody racket. I was down visiting Broad Oak that day and we heard it from there!!

Sent from my SM-G973F using Tapatalk
 

Yokel

LE
It? IT? SHE!

She now has both jets and ASW helicopters aboard.

Jets fly from British carrier in UK waters for the first time in ten years

British F-35B Lightning jets have flown from the decks of HMS Queen Elizabeth in UK waters, the first time fighter jets have operated from a British carrier in home waters in a decade.

HMS Queen Elizabeth is in the North Sea, conducting Carrier Qualification for Royal Navy and Royal Air Force pilots from the UK Lightning Force, based out of RAF Marham in Norfolk.

The jets are flying daily to and from the ship’s 4.5-acre deck, giving the pilots vital experience in operating from a floating airfield in both daylight and at night, some for the very first time. It also provides further training for the ship’s crew, who have previously conducted trials with UK and US Marine Corps Lightnings in the USA.


Not sure that 'floating airfield' should be used as a term...

Merlin crews earn their spurs on HMS Queen Elizabeth

During their time aboard HMS Queen Elizabeth, the fliers will complete deck landings/take offs and perfect similarly vital skills essential to operating a state-of-the-art helicopter at sea: ferrying supplies in giant sacks slung beneath the Merlin and refuelling while hovering.

They will take part in simulated attacks posed by surface and underwater threats and learn the art of working safely on a busy flight deck simultaneously with fast jets.

And trainee air engineers and technicians also have their own baptism of fire, learning how to look after a state-of-the-art aircraft in a hangar onboard a pitching, rolling ship.


I wish they would stop making out that the only reason we have ASW capabilities is to protect the carriers
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
It? IT? SHE!
Shit like this just has me shaking my head. It's straight out of the 'never satisfied'/'some people are permanently offended' book.

In terms of gender and empowerment, you're hardly likely to exceed an aircraft carrier. The militant types should be falling over themselves to have the ship referred to as a 'she'.
 

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