CVF and Carrier Strike thread

Navy's manpower problems are fixed.
"Adm Jones said the navy was getting to grips with its manpower ‘deficiencies’, with recent figures showing a promising increase in the number of people joining the service.


Speaking to The News, the senior sailor said: ‘Despite having to endure some deficiencies in our manning over the last couple of years – which caused us to designate a couple of our frigates and destroyers as harbour training ships and adaptive force ships, running with a smaller ship’s companies – we’re now through that."

Royal Navy’s top sailor vows warships won’t be laid up to help staff Britain's new aircraft carriers
 
Navy's manpower problems are fixed.
"Adm Jones said the navy was getting to grips with its manpower ‘deficiencies’, with recent figures showing a promising increase in the number of people joining the service.


Speaking to The News, the senior sailor said: ‘Despite having to endure some deficiencies in our manning over the last couple of years – which caused us to designate a couple of our frigates and destroyers as harbour training ships and adaptive force ships, running with a smaller ship’s companies – we’re now through that."

Royal Navy’s top sailor vows warships won’t be laid up to help staff Britain's new aircraft carriers
Personally, I'm very dubious of that claim and the devil will be in the detail.

There's a HUGE difference between liabilities, strength and even trained strength compared to having having sufficient personnel of the right caliber to operate. It'll be interesting to see how this plays out in the real world.

Regards,
MM
 
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Published by: Xavier Vavasseur, NAVALNEWS, 11 Mar 2019.

15 Destroyers & 1 Aircraft Carrier Under Construction at China’s Jiangnan Shipyard.

Recent aerial pictures of Jiangnan shipyard are doing the rounds on social media: They show no less than 15 destroyers and 1 aircraft carrier at various stage of construction.


The Jiangnan Changxing Shipbuilding and Heavy Industry Corporation (Jiangnan-Changxing) shipyard is located North East of Shanghai, on Changsing island. The shipyard is a member of China State Shipbuilding Corporation (CSSC).

The 15 destroyers are a mix of Type 052Ds and Type 055s, the two largest and most capable classes of surface combatants currently being built for the People’s Liberation Army Navy (PLAN or Chinese Navy).

23 Type 052 Destroyers are already operational with the PLAN or under construction. They are still under production by two shipyards: Jiangnan-Changxing shipyard and Dalian Shipbuilding Industry Company. The first vessel of the class, ‘Kunming’ (hull number 172), was commissioned in March 2014. The last one to be commissioned was “Hohhot” (hull number 161) in January this year.

The Type 052D Destroyer displaces 7,500 tons, has a length of 157 meters, a beam of 17 meters and a crew complement of 280 sailors.



At least eight Type 055 destroyers are under construction or fitting out. As for the Type 052D they are being built at the two shipyards: Jiangnan-Changxing and Dalian Shipbuilding Industry Company. First ship of the class, ‘Nanchang’ was launched in June 2017 in Shanghai and the second one was launched in April 2018 at the same shipyard.

The Type 055 Destroyer has a length of 180 meters, a beam of 20 meters and a draft of 6.6 meters for a full load displacement of 13,000t. These destroyers are the largest surface combatant currently being built in the world: They are larger than the US Navy’s Ticonderoga-class cruiser and the Flight III Arleigh Burke-class destroyer (9,800 tons) or the Royal Navy Type 45 (about 8,500 tons). Their official PLAN designation is “10,000-ton class destroyer” while the US Department of Defense have been calling them “cruisers” since 2017.

Last but not least, the area at the top right of the picture (where the large red cranes are located) reportedly shows the area where the PLAN’s third aircraft carrier (known as Type 003) is being constructed, with fairly large modules already in place.

15 Destroyers & 1 Aircraft Carrier Under Construction at China's Jiangnan Shipyard - Naval News

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Which will of course be classified so he doesn't actually expect to have to substantiate his claim to the public, or probably even MPs.
A lot of work is being done to change things to improve retention, for one thing. Additionally there will be increased use of Reservists as well. Shorter mobilisations may be on the cards, as opposed to six/nine/twelve month ones. Work has been ongoing allow SQEP personnel who want to stay in the service, but want a break from regular deployments, to transfer to the Reserves.

SQEP is the key word.

Apart from the fact that work is ongoing, would you really expect all policy and details to be public? You might be surprised to learn that the authoritative publication on naval personnel management, BR3, is a public document.

Anyway - getting back to carriers and aircraft: 814 NAS chase subs in the Mediterranean | Royal Navy

Nine surface ships led the hunt for five boats – including one British attack submarine – as helicopters such as those from 814 dropped sonobuoys and ‘dipped’ their sonar in the Mediterranean to listen for the tell-tale noises made by their underwater foes.

The chance to ‘play’ with both nuclear and conventional diesel-powered submarines in waters six degrees warmer and nearly ten times deeper than around the squadron’s native Cornwall – all factors which affect the ability of sonar to find boats – made Dynamic Manta an extremely useful training exercise.

“We succeeded in tracking ‘hostile’ submarines and scored confirmed kills. There was also some friendly cooperation with a boat – not all submariners deserve a torpedo from a Merlin!” said Commander Sarah Birchett, 814’s Commanding Officer – known as ‘Tiger Boss’.

“Dynamic Manta was a great training opportunity – it allowed my Tigers to hone their anti-submarine skills against worthy adversaries.

“Junior aircrew found operating in unfamiliar surroundings with nine other nations was an exciting challenge. They thrived in such an environment and became better aviators – and better submarine hunters – as a result.”

When is the next Exercise Deep Blue? I hope HMS Queen Elizabeth is there with a full complement of Merlins for 24/7 task group ASW.

The squadron also had to shift 35 tonnes of equipment, spare parts and tools – including 210 litres of oil and hydraulic fuel to the Italian air base.

It took six containers loaded aboard four lorries to carry the support pack – and four days to make the 1,917-mile road/tunnel/ferry journey from Cornwall to Catania.

If only they had been able to operate from a ship....
 
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The Royal Navy had traditionally been not only Britain's shield and sword, but also a diplomatic tool.

Indian Navy pays visit to Portsmouth | Royal Navy

The Royal Navy and the Indian Navy have formed the Carrier Capability Partnership which aims to share best practice from the UK’s carrier programme.

As part of this Adm Lanba was given a tour of HMS Queen Elizabeth and an insight into how the Royal Navy worked with key industrial partners to develop the aircraft carrier and her sister ship HMS Prince of Wales.

The First Sea Lord Admiral Sir Philip Jones said: “I am sure we will be able to develop further synergies in our respective future carrier strike capabilities. The important thing is that by developing these capabilities in tandem, we build in a level of interoperability.


Some of you might also be interested in this late eighties US Navy publication regarding ASW: Navy ASW - The Silent War
 
The Royal Navy had traditionally been not only Britain's shield and sword, but also a diplomatic tool.

Indian Navy pays visit to Portsmouth | Royal Navy

The Royal Navy and the Indian Navy have formed the Carrier Capability Partnership which aims to share best practice from the UK’s carrier programme.

As part of this Adm Lanba was given a tour of HMS Queen Elizabeth and an insight into how the Royal Navy worked with key industrial partners to develop the aircraft carrier and her sister ship HMS Prince of Wales.

The First Sea Lord Admiral Sir Philip Jones said: “I am sure we will be able to develop further synergies in our respective future carrier strike capabilities. The important thing is that by developing these capabilities in tandem, we build in a level of interoperability.

Some of you might also be interested in this late eighties US Navy publication regarding ASW: Navy ASW - The Silent War
Did everyone go for a nice curry afterwards? ;)
 
Personally, I'm very dubious of that claim and the devil will be in the detail.

There's a HUGE difference between liabilities, strength and even trained strength compared to having having sufficient personnel of the right caliber to operate. It'll be interesting to see how this plays out in the real world.

Regards,
MM
Same with the police - numbers belie capability (although the more junior, the less they earn/cost).

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