CVF and Carrier Strike thread

Wait till the hallowed Saint Sharkey sees the RAF name on the side of the F35. There'll be tears, tantrums and teddies thrown all over Grenada..........
The RN website says it was an ex SHAR driver who did the first SRVL landing:

F-35 pilot makes history with revolutionary method of landing jets on HMS Queen Elizabeth | Royal Navy

British test pilot Peter Wilson made history when he conducted the first ever shipborne rolling vertical landing (SRVL) this weekend – a method which looks like a conventional aircraft landing but requires even more intense skill and precision.

Previously the jets have conducted only vertical landings, hovering by the side of the ship before moving sideways over the deck and gently lowering down.

A rolling landing however requires the jet to make a more conventional landing approach, approaching the ship from behind at speed, before using thrust from its nozzle and lift created by air over the wings to touch down and gently come to a stop.

Lt Cdr Wilson was a member of the RNR Air Branch as well as a BAES Test Pilot. He still might be but he might have missed the twelve week TAO deadline.....

More seriously a huge amount of British Engineering, Mathematics, and Software capability made SRVL possible. One hundred years after the launch of the first real aircraft carrier (with flush deck), HMS Argus, we are still innovating.
 
The RN website says it was an ex SHAR driver who did the first SRVL landing:

F-35 pilot makes history with revolutionary method of landing jets on HMS Queen Elizabeth | Royal Navy

British test pilot Peter Wilson made history when he conducted the first ever shipborne rolling vertical landing (SRVL) this weekend – a method which looks like a conventional aircraft landing but requires even more intense skill and precision.

Previously the jets have conducted only vertical landings, hovering by the side of the ship before moving sideways over the deck and gently lowering down.

A rolling landing however requires the jet to make a more conventional landing approach, approaching the ship from behind at speed, before using thrust from its nozzle and lift created by air over the wings to touch down and gently come to a stop.

Lt Cdr Wilson was a member of the RNR Air Branch as well as a BAES Test Pilot. He still might be but he might have missed the twelve week TAO deadline.....

More seriously a huge amount of British Engineering, Mathematics, and Software capability made SRVL possible. One hundred years after the launch of the first real aircraft carrier (with flush deck), HMS Argus, we are still innovating.
Pete Wilson started out in life as an RAF creamie QFI at Church Fenton or Linton on Ouse in the late 80s / early 90s. That's why he wears RAF wings................
 
Pete Wilson started out in life as an RAF creamie QFI at Church Fenton or Linton on Ouse in the late 80s / early 90s. That's why he wears RAF wings................
He must have been attached to the RN at some point (or transferred) to be RNR Air Branch. Not that it matters. It was a dig at the twelve week rule some of us have to deal with.

Just delighted that Brit innovation leads the way in carrier ops, as it has so many times in the past.
The trouble is we seem very reticent to celebrate our technical achievements.
 
He must have been attached to the RN at some point (or transferred) to be RNR Air Branch. Not that it matters. It was a dig at the twelve week rule some of us have to deal with.
Pete Wilson started out in life as an RAF creamie QFI at Church Fenton or Linton on Ouse in the late 80s / early 90s. That's why he wears RAF wings................
IIRC, he transferred to the RN in the early 90s, did a few years on the SHAR and then headed to BAES.
 
Do the SRVL trials mean she (Queen Elizabeth) has the Bedford Array lighting fitted? Not intending a pun- but we have really hit the deck running with lots of flying in the last few weeks.

Trials continue: First test bombs dropped from HMS Queen Elizabeth’s F-35 Lightning fighter jets | Royal Navy

The first bombs have been dropped from F-35 Lightning fighter jets conducting trials on board Britain’s newest aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth.

The inert GBU-12 Paveway II laser guided precision bombs were dropped off the east coast of the USA, marking another significant milestone in the carrier’s trials.

Adding the 500lb bombs to the jets for take-off has enabled the trials teams to see how the jets behave when carrying various weights, gathering crucial test data.

It is the first time the American-made bombs have ever been embarked in a UK ship. They are made up of a head, containing the bomb’s computer, the tail and a concrete warhead. As they are test bombs, they carry no explosives.


Aviation Ordnanceman Petty Officer 2nd Class Robert Little, of the US Navy, was part of the team overseeing the Royal Navy air engineers on board. He added: “The team has run really well with the work we have done with them, they have come up to speed pretty fast.”

They are being built onboard by Royal Navy air engineers, supervised by specialist US Navy ordnance ratings from the US aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower, further demonstrating the close co-operation between the two key allied nations.

Commander Neil Mathieson, the head of the air engineering department on board HMS Queen Elizabeth, said: “This marks a significant milestone for us. It makes me excited about operational trials next year with the UK’s F-35 Lightning squadrons when we will see live Paveways being dropped. These trials are an important pathway to that point.”
 
Britain's biggest warship HMS Queen Elizabeth arrives in New York | Royal Navy

The visit brings to an end Captain Kyd’s stint as the first Commanding Officer of HMS Queen Elizabeth. He hands over to Captain Nick Cooke-Priest who will take the future flagship through her second spell of Lightning trials.

Readers of a certain age may remember the 1995 Chris Terill documentary HMS Brilliant about the frigate of the same name. Amongst the people we met was the Lynx Observer - S/Lt Cooke-Priest.

Those trials resume with far more achieved in the first three weeks than anticipated: 98 take-offs using the ski ramp, the first ‘rolling’ landing, bringing the F-35 to a stop on the flight deck instead of the aircraft dropping down vertically, night flying and even some rough weather trials to begin pushing the conditions in which the carrier can operate her air power safely.

Capt Jerry Kyd added: “It has been a superb effort by everyone across the Integrated Test Force and HMS Queen Elizabeth so far – I could not be more pleased with the team spirit and dynamism shown by all.

“That has delivered a volume of quality data which has put us well ahead of where we expected to be at this stage. I am very grateful to all the Integrated Test Force folk who have been focused, professional and willing to go the extra mile.”

The fact that we have been able to pick up fixed wing carrier operations after the post SDSR 10 gap, without accident, says a lot about the Navy's resilience and the efforts of people to work around problems.
 
Last edited:
They could have at least left some F35s on board for the cameras!

Sent from my SM-G920F using Tapatalk
 
Last edited:
Looks like the junglies may have some compilation coming there way as a FMS has been requested on 16 “wide body” Chinnoks. AKA MH47.

United Kingdom – H-47 Chinook (Extended Range) Helicopters and Accessories | The Official Home of the Defense Security Cooperation Agency
I wouldn’t say it’s competition for the Junglies.

These are presumably replacements for some of our older cabs, some of which are now pushing 40 years of age. Meanwhile, there’s been a long-standing desire by ‘them’ to have some MH-47s. That would provide a useful AAR-capable long-rangeinsertion capability similar to USSOCOM.

Therefore, a small buy of MH-47 is sensible if someone can find the dosh. However, there’s then the small question of how we’d refuel them!

Regards,
MM
 
I wouldn’t say it’s competition for the Junglies.

These are presumably replacements for some of our older cabs, some of which are now pushing 40 years of age. Meanwhile, there’s been a long-standing desire by ‘them’ to have some MH-47s. That would provide a useful AAR-capable long-rangeinsertion capability similar to USSOCOM.

Therefore, a small buy of MH-47 is sensible if someone can find the dosh. However, there’s then the small question of how we’d refuel them!

Regards,
MM
Have we not been here before, on that particular subject ?!

I seem to remember a purchase we already made to satisfy "a long-standing desire by ‘them’ to have some MH-47s", that involved expensive modoficaations (comms/glass cockpits?), meaning they were incompatible with the rest of the fleet, and after many years parked-up in a hanger, they had to be subjected to (even more expensive) retro-modifications, so that they could be integrated into the rest of the UK fleet?!
 
Have we not been here before, on that particular subject ?!

I seem to remember a purchase we already made to satisfy "a long-standing desire by ‘them’ to have some MH-47s", that involved expensive modoficaations (comms/glass cockpits?), meaning they were incompatible with the rest of the fleet, and after many years parked-up in a hanger, they had to be subjected to (even more expensive) retro-modifications, so that they could be integrated into the rest of the UK fleet?!
No.

That particular saga arose when the RAF sought to buy some MH-47Es, an established type already in service with the US Army.

Instead, the budgeteers said, those are too expensive; you’re gold plating a solution. If we buy some modified Chinooks with extra fuel capacity and new avionics, it will cost less and you’ll be able to do everything the MH-47E does apart from AAR.

Those bespoke cabs were duly delivered but could not meet airworthiness requirements as Boeing has insufficient evidence to sssure the unique software. Over a decade later, we eventually managed to get them in service at far greater cost than had we bought MH-47Es off the shelf.

This time, we seem to be looking to buy MH-47Gs, an established type already in service with the US Army. Hopefully, the lessons have been learned.

Regards,
MM
 
No.

That particular saga arose when the RAF sought to buy some MH-47Es, an established type already in service with the US Army.

Instead, the budgeteers said, those are too expensive; you’re gold plating a solution. If we buy some modified Chinooks with extra fuel capacity and new avionics, it will cost less and you’ll be able to do everything the MH-47E does apart from AAR.

Those bespoke cabs were duly delivered but could not meet airworthiness requirements as Boeing has insufficient evidence to sssure the unique software. Over a decade later, we eventually managed to get them in service at far greater cost than had we bought MH-47Es off the shelf.

This time, we seem to be looking to buy MH-47Gs, an established type already in service with the US Army. Hopefully, the lessons have been learned.

Regards,
MM
That's the "Badgers" . . . .

"The RAF Chinook Mk 6. The Mk6 (or HC6) features a digital glass cockpit and a Digital Advanced Flight Control System (DAFCS). A turret under the nose holds a Selex ES Titan 385ES FLIR/EO pod which enhances the pilot's ability to fly in low light conditions. A Selex ES Helicopter Integrated Defensive Aids System protects against anti-aircraft missiles.


Image by Andrew Linnett / Crown Copyright 2014 used under open government licence

One of the interesting bits of info in the article relates to the differences between the Chinooks operated by each unit. A U.S. pilot remarked:

"I'm blown away by how light their aircraft are. We are used to flying a heavier aircraft and their tactics are revolved around flying a lighter aircraft. They come in a lot faster than we do.

The advantage on board the U.S. Chinook MH-47G aircraft is primarily technology, where as the Mark 6 is in its weight. The mindset of both aviation units is identical, providing support to the forces on the ground."

The difference in performance and handling is not surprising. Both variants use the same model of engines: 2x T55-GA-714A engines, but while both aircraft are based around the CH-47F airframe, the MH-47G sports a set of 'fat' fuel tanks fitted along each side of the fuselage. These greatly extend its range but also result in a heavier and slower aircraft".

British Vs American Special Operations Chinooks
 
I wouldn’t say it’s competition for the Junglies.

These are presumably replacements for some of our older cabs, some of which are now pushing 40 years of age. Meanwhile, there’s been a long-standing desire by ‘them’ to have some MH-47s. That would provide a useful AAR-capable long-rangeinsertion capability similar to USSOCOM.

Therefore, a small buy of MH-47 is sensible if someone can find the dosh. However, there’s then the small question of how we’d refuel them!

Regards,
MM
@meerkatz magic free MV22’s.

I personally think it’s an excellent idea to have MH47(a-z) in the locker.
 

Latest Threads

Top