CVF and Carrier Strike thread

Come on both you and @alfred_the_great know, the Royal Airforce are the kings of fast ASW...
Maximum speeds

QE CV: 25 kts.
T23 FFG: 28 kts.
Astute SSN: 30 kts.

Yasen SSN: 35 kts.

Poseidon MRA1: 440 kts.

Regards,
MM
 
Yeah, speed is great for listening to slow, quiet, holes in the water. You just there quicker and spend more on expendables.
;)
Regards,
MM
 
If only someone had invented a type of aircraft that can hover or fly at low speed for long periods, be based close to the action, and lower some sort of sonar transducer into the water, maybe even lowering it to below 'the layer'....

Maybe we could have a ship where lots of these things could operate from?

Or maybe could have a very long range system exploiting the laws of Physics for long range detection?
 
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If only someone had invented a type of aircraft that can hover or fly at low speed for long periods, be based close to the action, and lower some sort of sonar transducer into the water, maybe even lowering it to below 'the layer'....

Maybe we could have a ship where lots of these things could operate from?

Or maybe could have a very long range system exploiting the laws of Physics for long range detection?
Look at the top speeds cited above. SSNs and even SSBNs can outpace surface ships (which are themselves predictable to an extent) including carriers, particularly in high sea states.

Now, while they’re making such high speed, the submarine will be making more noise than you would at a Sea Harrier Appreciation Society AGM. However, if you can’t get close enough to prosecute them with your ASW helicopters, that’s irrelevant. When far enough ahead of enemy CVs, FFGs etc, the speeding SSN/SSBN can slow down and adopt ‘hole in the water’ mode again. They won’t however, outpace an MPA, which can turn up unexpectedly anywhere to spoil a Russian boat skipper’s day.

There’s no state secrets there; once again, it’s merely the laws of physics as described in the excellent ‘The Silent Deep.’ Ships - even carriers - have their limitations just as an MPA’s impermanence is also a drawback.

ASW is a team sport.

Regards,
MM
 
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Look at the top speeds cited above. SSNs and even SSBNs can outpace surface ships (which are themselves predictable to an extent) including carriers, particularly in high sea states.

Now, while they’re making such high speed, the submarine will be making more noise than you would at a Sea Harrier Appreciation Society AGM. However, if you can’t get close enough to prosecute them with your ASW helicopters, that’s irrelevant. When far enough ahead of enemy CVs, FFGs etc, the speeding SSN/SSBN can slow down and adopt ‘hole in the water’ mode again. They won’t however, outpace an MPA, which can turn up unexpectedly anywhere to spoil a Russian boat skipper’s day.

There’s no state secrets there; once again, it’s merely the laws of physics as described in the excellent ‘The Silent Deep.’ Ships - even carriers - have their limitations just as an MPA’s impermanence is also a drawback.

ASW is a team sport.

Regards,
MM

My bold - love it!!!
 
ASW is a team sport - even targets T45 can come and play.

Never forget speed/height/reach people.

More interestingly, I wonder if one of the MASaCs Obs will be LHS trained?
 
...More interestingly, I wonder if one of the MASaCs Obs will be LHS trained?
Iirc from my couple of SKASaC jollies (I never did find the galley!), I think both Obs were so I would assume this would continue with MASaC if they follow the single pilot route.

Regards,
MM
 

That tweet seems to have gone as fast as it came. It was simply a picture looking into QE and noting that the 820 NAS Merlins are a familiar site. It also noted that "excellence is not an act, it is a habit". In addition to the normal C2DRIL values, it demands everyone to have attention to detail (FOD awareness, tool control, light discipline amongst other things) and the ability to learn from experience,
 
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