CVF and Carrier Strike thread

On a changing note, and going back to a point someone made earlier, does anyone know the story of HMS Ark Royal having a Swordfish on her deck in 1986?



Did it land on? Did it take off again? Would a similar thing be possible today post Heddon Cave? Given the importance of the rare Swordfish I kid of think it best not.

If you really wanted to design an aircraft for STOL unaided launch/recovery - would the technologies developed for F-35B help?
From what I’ve read, the last Swordfish to take off from a carrier was on Victorious in the 60s. Didn’t land on, however. It was loaded by crane.
 
When was the last Swordfish landing?

I recall that just before SDSR 10, I bought my Father a copy of Pheonix Squadron. I have not seen it since, but there was something about USN aircraft cross decking, and the C-1 Trader was able to take of unassisted...

Or have I got that completely wrong?
 
On a carrier/aircraft related theme, I have recently started a discussion about the proposed P1154 aircraft. It seems I was wrong to see it (the RN version) as a Sea Harrier on steroids, and possibly capable of operating from a CVS sized ship.

P1154
 
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On a changing note, and going back to a point someone made earlier, does anyone know the story of HMS Ark Royal having a Swordfish on her deck in 1986?



Did it land on? Did it take off again? Would a similar thing be possible today post Heddon Cave? Given the importance of the rare Swordfish I kid of think it best not.

If you really wanted to design an aircraft for STOL unaided launch/recovery - would the technologies developed for F-35B help?
Equal STOVL capability to the SHAR but with increased payload? :-D
 
First fixed wing pilots join HMS Queen Elizabeth

Also joining the ship is Commander James Blackmore who takes up the role of Commander Air, more affectionately known as ‘Wings’. Joining HMS Queen Elizabeth directly from Command of the Fixed Wing Force at RNAS Culdrose, and having the privilege of piloting the last ever Sea Harrier to launch from HMS Ark Royal, he will oversee the integration of the Joint Strike Fighter and its supporting elements.

“This is something we have all waited for about 20 years to see, it’s very exciting and a real privilege to be a part of”, he said. “The main challenge for us is getting focused on bringing a jet to sea again, and that’s not a simple prospect. There are only a handful of nations in the world who operate aircraft carriers and aircraft at sea.

“In simple terms, when an aircraft leaves the deck, it leaves its runway and the runway isn’t where it left it when it comes back. The runway pitches, rolls, heaves, moves, gets covered in waves – all those things are at play when you bring an aircraft onto the deck. That will be a unique thing for many of our people, and we need to train to understand and work with the challenges involved in conducting our air operations safely”.
 
I missed this bit:

The data gathered during the trials will enable the ship to declare Initial Operating Capability (IOC) as a Landing Platform Helicopter (LPH) later this year, a role held most recently by HMS Ocean.

Royal Marines from 42 Commando have also been on board during this trials period, undergoing Assault training – whereby they are processed through the ship and launched by helicopter to conduct operations ashore.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
That should reveal whether the routes between decks are OK for a fully loaded Bootie. A bit late now if they are not.




 
I missed this bit:

The data gathered during the trials will enable the ship to declare Initial Operating Capability (IOC) as a Landing Platform Helicopter (LPH) later this year, a role held most recently by HMS Ocean.

Royal Marines from 42 Commando have also been on board during this trials period, undergoing Assault training – whereby they are processed through the ship and launched by helicopter to conduct operations ashore.

A wee bit more (tho' not much more) on this...

42 Commando launch 'assault' from aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth
 
First fixed wing pilots join HMS Queen Elizabeth

Also joining the ship is Commander James Blackmore who takes up the role of Commander Air, more affectionately known as ‘Wings’. Joining HMS Queen Elizabeth directly from Command of the Fixed Wing Force at RNAS Culdrose, and having the privilege of piloting the last ever Sea Harrier to launch from HMS Ark Royal, he will oversee the integration of the Joint Strike Fighter and its supporting elements.

“This is something we have all waited for about 20 years to see, it’s very exciting and a real privilege to be a part of”, he said. “The main challenge for us is getting focused on bringing a jet to sea again, and that’s not a simple prospect. There are only a handful of nations in the world who operate aircraft carriers and aircraft at sea.

“In simple terms, when an aircraft leaves the deck, it leaves its runway and the runway isn’t where it left it when it comes back. The runway pitches, rolls, heaves, moves, gets covered in waves – all those things are at play when you bring an aircraft onto the deck. That will be a unique thing for many of our people, and we need to train to understand and work with the challenges involved in conducting our air operations safely”.
Is that the same article which shows the four pilots? Is one of them USN?
 
Joining HMS Queen Elizabeth directly from Command of the Fixed Wing Force at RNAS Culdrose,
The RN have fixed wing aircraft? Buccaneer? No. F4? No. Gannet? No. Sea Har? No. ??
 
Joining HMS Queen Elizabeth directly from Command of the Fixed Wing Force at RNAS Culdrose,
The RN have fixed wing aircraft? Buccaneer? No. F4? No. Gannet? No. Sea Har? No. ??
Hawk.

And the guys in the FA18 scheme.

And the RN QFIs at valley.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
13DE3514-EB5A-409D-A3D1-4E390DCF55AD.jpeg
 
A couple of trainers and somebody else's planes. Hhhmmm.
No, like your former Service, the RN has an extensive exchange programme with pilots flying the following USN and USMC fixed wing types:

FA-18C/D
FA-18E/F
AV-8B
T-45C

Meanwhile, the joint nature of F-35B means that the RAF has a similar arrangement on the following:

FA-18C/D
FA-18E/F
EA-18G
Av-8B
F-35B

Indeed, there are more UK pilots flying Super Hornets in the US than the RAAF have (and they are FA-18F and EA-18G operators!).

Both services also have a number of rotary exchanges with the USN, USMC and USCG. Many of those posts are specifically designed to expedite the regeneration of Carrier Strike and F-35B capabilities in the round.

Regards,
MM
 
No, like your former Service, the RN has an extensive exchange programme with pilots flying the following USN and USMC fixed wing types:

FA-18C/D
FA-18E/F
AV-8B
T-45C

Meanwhile, the joint nature of F-35B means that the RAF has a similar arrangement on the following:

FA-18C/D
FA-18E/F
EA-18G
Av-8B
F-35B

Indeed, there are more UK pilots flying Super Hornets in the US than the RAAF have (and they are FA-18F and EA-18G operators!).

Both services also have a number of rotary exchanges with the USN, USMC and USCG. Many of those posts are specifically designed to expedite the regeneration of Carrier Strike and F-35B capabilities in the round.

Regards,
MM
@Magic_Mushroom is the Gent 2nd from left in the photo, USN? (Article about 4 fixed wing pilots coming aboard QEC).
 
Is that the same article which shows the four pilots? Is one of them USN?
According to the text; Commander Mike Mullen USN. Any relation to the Admiral of that name?
 
No, like your former Service, the RN has an extensive exchange programme with pilots flying the following USN and USMC fixed wing types:

FA-18C/D
FA-18E/F
AV-8B
T-45C

Meanwhile, the joint nature of F-35B means that the RAF has a similar arrangement on the following:

FA-18C/D
FA-18E/F
EA-18G
Av-8B
F-35B

Indeed, there are more UK pilots flying Super Hornets in the US than the RAAF have (and they are FA-18F and EA-18G operators!).

Both services also have a number of rotary exchanges with the USN, USMC and USCG. Many of those posts are specifically designed to expedite the regeneration of Carrier Strike and F-35B capabilities in the round.

Regards,
MM
Plus the gent on exchange with the USMC flying CH53’s is a very good mate.
 
Plus the gent on exchange with the USMC flying CH53’s is a very good mate.
He was until you blew his PERSEC!

Double first as HMS Queen Elizabeth and RFA Tidespring meet up at sea

RASing is fundamental to carrier operations - every US nuclear powered ones do it regularly, something they have in common with every other warship (standfast submarines).

Meanwhile - 847 NAS are building relationships:

Wildcats join French task group for unique Pacific mission
 

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